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Publications (10)10.75 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to compare the results of thoracoscopic surgery for congenital lung diseases between infants younger than 6 months and those older than 6 months at the time of surgery in terms of operation duration, surgical complications, chest tube duration, and hospital stay. The charts of 30 thoracoscopic resections for congenital lung diseases were retrospectively reviewed. This study compared 17 children younger than 6 months (mean, 3.94 months; range, 0.37-5.7 months; group 1) with 13 children older than 6 months (mean, 12.05 months; range, 6.2-24.63 months; group 2) at the time of surgery. The median follow-up period was 9 months (range, 1-41 months). Lobectomy was performed in 27 cases, bilobectomy in 1 case, and nonanatomic excision in 2 cases. The mean operating time for group 1 (176±54 min) was similar to that for group 2 (160±46 min). The difference is not significant. The mean duration of chest tube drainage was similar in the two groups (4.4 days; range, 1-9 days for group 1 vs. 4.1 days; range, 3-8 days for group 2). The complications included 1 major and 10 minor complications, with no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Three surgical procedures in each group were converted. The hospital stay was not statistically different between the two groups (8 days; range, 3-20 days for group 1 vs. 6 days; range, 4-10 days for group 2). The study findings showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of operation time, complication rate, conversion rate, or hospital stay. Lobectomy can be safely and successfully performed by thoracoscopy even for children younger than 6 months.
    Surgical Endoscopy 02/2011; 25(2):593-6. · 3.43 Impact Factor
  • Archives De Pediatrie - ARCHIVES PEDIATRIE. 01/2010; 17(6):44-44.
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary infections, and particularly cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, are a major cause of morbidity after lung transplantation. We report here our results in 49 pediatric lung transplantations. Between may 1988 and 1997, we have done 49 lung transplantations in 42 children (en bloc double lung transplantation (DLT):10, HLTx:7, sequential bilateral sequential-lung transplantation (BSLT):31, single-lung transplantation (SLT): 1). In seven, it was a retransplantation. Among these, 34 were cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, all with multiresistant organisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Achromobacter xylososydans, Staphylococcus aureus). All patients were treated with multiantibiotic prophylaxy adapted to the preoperative cultures. Donor-recipient CMV matching was possible in only 31 cases. CMV prophylaxy and immunosuppression protocols have evolved with time, with a current protocol of IV Gancyclovir prophylaxy for 3 months and triple drug immunosuppression without post-operative rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (RATG) induction. There was no perioperative mortality in the primary transplantations and three early deaths in the whole group (6.1%). Only five patients had no pulmonary infection. The patients presented 3.2 infection episodes per year, 75% localized on the lungs, 41% during the first 3 months. Among the 13 deaths in the 1st year, 10 were directly related to infection, 60% due to CMV. After the 1st year, in all patients dying of pulmonary dysfunction or obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), bacterial infections were associated. There was no serious fungal infection. Actuarial survival at 3 months, 1, 3, 5 years were 85, 65.7, 47.5 and 28.5%, respectively. There was a significant difference in 3 year survival between patients receiving CMV negative organs (40%) and CMV positive organs (17%). In our experience, as in other's, pulmonary infection risk is important in lung transplantation. Bacterial infections were mainly an aggravating factor of secondary pulmonary dysfunction or OB, and were not the primary cause of death. CMV infections have been very severe and lead us, despite the scarcity of donors, to avoid positive donors in negative recipients, this leads to disastrous mid-term results in our experience, despite prophylaxis.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 05/1999; 15(4):490-4; discussion 495. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Pulmonary infections, and particularly cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, are a major cause of morbidity after lung transplantation. We report here our results in 49 pediatric lung transplantations. Methods: Between may 1988 and 1997, we have done 49 lung transplantations in 42 children (en bloc double lung transplantation (DLT):10, HLTx:7, sequential bilateral sequential-lung transplantation (BSLT):31, single-lung transplantation (SLT): 1). In seven, it was a retransplantation. Among these, 34 were cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, all with multiresistant organisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Achromobacter xylososydans, Staphyloccus aureus). All patients were treated with multiantibiotic prophylaxy adapted to the preoperative cultures. Donor-recipient CMV matching was possible in only 31 cases. CMV prophylaxy and immunosuppression protocols have evolved with time, with a current protocol of IV Gancyclovir prophylaxy for 3 months and triple drug immunosuppression without post-operative rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (RATG) induction. There was no perioperative mortality in the primary transplantations and three early deaths in the whole group (6.1%). Results: Only five patients had no pulmonary infection. The patients presented 3.2 infection episodes per year, 75% localized on the lungs, 41% during the first 3 months. Among the 13 deaths in the 1st year, 10 were directly related to infection, 60% due to CMV. After the 1st year, in all patients dying of pulmonary dysfunction or obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), bacterial infections were associated. There was no serious fungal infection. Actuarial survival at 3 months, 1, 3, 5 years were 85, 65.7, 47.5 and 28.5%, respectively. There was a significant difference in 3 year survival between patients receiving CMV negative organs (40%) and CMV positive organs (17%). Conclusion: In our experience, as in other's, pulmonary infection risk is important in lung transplantation. Bacterial infections were mainly an aggravating factor of secondary pulmonary dysfunction or OB, and were not the primary cause of death. CMV infections have been very severe and lead us, despite the scarcity of donors, to avoid positive donors in negative recipients, this leads to disastrous mid-term results in our experience, despite prophylaxis.
    European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery - EUR J CARDIO-THORAC SURG. 01/1999; 15(4):490-495.
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    ABSTRACT: The classical orthotopic heart transplant modifies size and geometry of the atria, may affect mitral and tricuspid function, and ventricular filling. A technical modification with subtotal excision of the recipient's heart, with anastomosis of a cuff of left atrium and of venae cavae has been used and compared with 2 consecutive series of transplantations : 70 classical (group I) 1986-1991, and 50 modified (group II) 1992-1994. The patients were similar for age, pretransplant characteristics, postoperative treatment. The aortic cross-clamping in the recipient (duration of cardiac excision and graft implantation) has been longer in group II (87 +/- 19 mm vs 65 +/- 15: p < 0.001). No surgical complication due to the technique was observed. Mortality was similar in the 2 groups (14% group I, 18% group II; NS). Five patients of group I has a systemic embolism (1 month to 5 years after transplant), none in group II. Two comparable groups of 30 patients were studied at least 6 months after transplantation with: surface EKG, Holter, transthoracic and esophageal echodoppler. A larger number of EKG anomalies, a significant increase in the size of atria, a significantly larger number of mitral and tricuspid insufficiencies, an increase in the variability of E/A ratio (left ventricular filling parameter) were noted after classical transplantation. Spontaneous contrast echo and thrombus in the left atrium were also noted after classical transplant. We conclude that these technical modifications result in a geometry and anatomy closer to normal. Less anomalies of the cardiac function were found. Due to the absence of left atrial thrombus and of systemic embolism we think that there is a definite advantage in this technically rather simple approach.
    Archives des maladies du coeur et des vaisseaux 01/1997; 90(1):27-34. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined our experience with bilateral single-lung transplantation in pediatric patients. Between 1988 and 1995, we have performed 32 double-lung transplantations in children. The first 10 were performed en bloc, the following 22 by bilateral single-lung transplantation. Indications for bilateral single-lung transplantation were cystic fibrosis in 16 patients, primitive obliterative bronchiolitis in 1, pulmonary artery hypertension in 1, and retransplantation in 4. Patients' ages ranged from 7 to 16 years (mean, 12 years). Four patients underwent a parenchymal reduction (lobectomy or bilobectomy). Bilateral single-lung transplantation was performed with a "clam-shell" incision, normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and a beating heart. There was one postoperative death (heart failure in a retransplantation patient). Bleeding was moderate, and 4 patients had a bloodless procedure. Bronchial healing was satisfactory, with 3 patients receiving temporary left main bronchus stenting. There were two hospital deaths (recurrent cytomegalovirus infection in a retransplantation patient and multiorgan failure at 2 months) and seven late deaths, caused by infection (mostly cytomegalovirus), obliterative bronchiolitis, or both. Actuarial survival was 75% at 1 year, 56% at 2 years, and 36% at 3 years. We conclude that bilateral single-lung transplantation appears to be an acceptable technique, even in small children. Bronchial healing is satisfactory, and no revascularization procedure appears necessary. Midterm and long-term results are comparable with those of heart-lung transplants, and in view of the current problems with organ donation, we think it is an adequate strategy in pediatric lung parenchymal disease.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 01/1996; 60(6 Suppl):S578-81. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BackgroundThis study examined our experience with bilateral single-lung transplantation in pediatric patients.MethodsBetween 1988 and 1995, we have performed 32 double-lung transplantations in children. The first 10 were performed en bloc, the following 22 by bilateral single-lung transplantation. Indications for bilateral single-lung transplantation were cystic fibrosis in 16 patients, primitive obliterative bronchiolitis in 1, pulmonary artery hypertension in 1, and retransplantation in 4. Patients' ages ranged from 7 to 16 years (mean, 12 years). Four patients underwent a parenchymal reduction (lobectomy or bilobectomy). Bilateral single-lung transplantation was performed with a “clam-shell” incision, normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and a beating heart.ResultsThere was one postoperative death (heart failure in a retransplantation patient). Bleeding was moderate, and 4 patients had a bloodless procedure. Bronchial healing was satisfactory, with 3 patients receiving temporary left main bronchus stenting. There were two hospital deaths (recurrent cytomegalovirus infection in a retransplantation patient and multiorgan failure at 2 months) and seven late deaths, caused by infection (mostly cytomegalovirus), obliterative bronchiolitis, or both. Actuarial survival was 75% at 1 year, 56% at 2 years, and 36% at 3 years.ConclusionsWe conclude that bilateral single-lung transplantation appears to be an acceptable technique, even in small children. Bronchial healing is satisfactory, and no revascularization procedure appears necessary. Midterm and long-term results are comparable with those of heart-lung transplants, and in view of the current problems with organ donation, we think it is an adequate strategy in pediatric lung parenchymal disease.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 01/1995;
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    ABSTRACT: Since December 1985, we have performed 38 transplantations: cardiac (CT) n: 31, cardiopulmonary (CPT) n: 1, or bipulmonary (BPT) n: 6. There were 31 male and 7 female patients, aged 7 to 62, mean 46. In the cardiac group, the cardiomyopathy was primitive in 13, ischemic in 16, valvular in 2. Five patients had undergone one or more previous operations. Three patients had a biventricular assist device (1,6 and 7 days before transplant) for acute cardiac failure. The indication of CPT or BPT was pulmonary artery hypertension (1), silicosis (1), cystic fibrosis (4). There were 4 post-operative deaths in the CT group (12.9%); failure of graft, low cardiac output, pulmonary artery hypertension by multiple pulmonary thrombosis, and 2 deaths in the CPT and BPT groups (28%). The mean post-operative hospital stay was one month. All patients with CT were treated by an initial maintenance bitherapy protocol (cyclosporine, steroids) and observed by myocardial biopsies and echocardiograms. In 40 per cent of the patients, Azathioprine was subsequently added. The patients had 2.1 rejection episode/patient/year, either spontaneously reversed of treated medically. There were two late deaths (2 and 7 months) by refractory rejection. 78 per cent of the patients were alive one year after transplant. All survivors have recovered a normal life, some of them with full-time work.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    Archives des maladies du coeur et des vaisseaux 03/1990; 83(2):209-15. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a series of 22 children with complete atrioventricular canal (CAVC) operated upon before the age of one year. The youngest patient was 1 month old and weighed 3 kg. The patients' mean age was 7 months and their mean weight was 5.4 kg. 15 patients had trisomy 21, and in one patient the CAVC was associated with tetralogy of Fallot. The remaining 21 patients had congestive heart failure resistant to medical treatment, with clinical evidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAHT). At the time of surgery, 2 patients had been under artificial respiration for one month. All patients were explored by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. The mean pulmonary pressure/aortic pressure ratio was 0.92; the mean pulmonary flow rate/systemic flow rate ratio (Qp/Qs) was 2.9/1 and the mean pulmonary resistance/systemic resistance ratio (Rp/Rs) was 0.22. All children were operated upon under deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest (mean 54 min); the patient with tetralogy of Fallot had an additional period of extracorporeal circulation. Fourteen patients had Rastelli's type A CAVC and 8 had type C CAVC. All were operated upon by the classical Rastelli technique, using a single autologous pericardial patch; in none of the patients was the septal "slit" or "commissure" entirely closed. Three patients died within 48 hours of the operation: the first one died of sudden low cardiac output 18 hours after surgery, the second one of persistent PAHT and the third one of malignant hyperthermia. The patient under artificial respiration before surgery could not be disconnected and died on the 30th post-operative day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    Archives des maladies du coeur et des vaisseaux 06/1989; 82(5):719-22. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Pulmonary infections, and particularly cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, are a major cause of morbidity after lung transplantation. We report here our results in 49 pediatric lung transplantations. Methods: Between may 1988 and 1997, we have done 49 lung transplantations in 42 children (en bloc double lung transplantation (DLT):10, HLTx:7, sequential bilateral sequential-lung transplantation (BSLT):31, single-lung transplantation (SLT): 1). In seven, it was a retransplantation. Among these, 34 were cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, all with multiresistant organisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Achromobacter xylososydans, Staphyloccus aureus). All patients were treated with multiantibiotic prophylaxy adapted to the preoperative cultures. Donor-recipient CMV matching was possible in only 31 cases. CMV prophylaxy and immunosuppression protocols have evolved with time, with a current protocol of IV Gancyclovir prophylaxy for 3 months and triple drug immunosuppression without post-operative rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (RATG) induction. There was no perioperative mortality in the primary transplantations and three early deaths in the whole group (6.1%). Results: Only five patients had no pulmonary infection. The patients presented 3.2 infection episodes per year, 75% localized on the lungs, 41% during the first 3 months. Among the 13 deaths in the 1st year, 10 were directly related to infection, 60% due to CMV. After the 1st year, in all patients dying of pulmonary dysfunction or obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), bacterial infections were associated. There was no serious fungal infection. Actuarial survival at 3 months, 1, 3, 5 years were 85, 65.7, 47.5 and 28.5%, respectively. There was a significant difference in 3 year survival between patients receiving CMV negative organs (40%) and CMV positive organs (17%). Conclusion: In our experience, as in other's, pulmonary infection risk is important in lung transplantation. Bacterial infections were mainly an aggravating factor of secondary pulmonary dysfunction or OB, and were not the primary cause of death. CMV infections have been very severe and lead us, despite the scarcity of donors, to avoid positive donors in negative recipients, this leads to disastrous mid-term results in our experience, despite prophylaxis.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery.