N Nagano

Kobari General Hospital, Tiba, Chiba, Japan

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Publications (24)26.87 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) prior to noncardiac major surgery has effectively decreases short-and long-term mortality related to coronary ischemia. Coronary artery bypass on the beating heart is conducted to avoid the risk of cardiopulmonary bypass and it has contribute to shorten recovery time.Methods: Subjects were 19 patients with malignant neoplasm for whom a retrospective chart review was made between Jan. 1, 1992 and July 31, 1998. In the early phase of this study, between Jan. 1, 1992, and Dec. 31, 1997, CABG was performed using cardiopulmonary bypass, and late phase, between Jan. 1, 1998, and July 1, 1998, CABG was done on the beating heart without cardiopulmonary bypass.Results: Conventional CABG was performed in 12 patients with neoplasms (10 male and 2 female, age 64.7 ± 6.1 years), and CABG on the beating heart was performed in 7 patients (6 male and 1 female, age 68.0 ± 7.5 years). Fewer number of bypass grafts were made in the beating-heart CABG group (1.3 ± 0.5 in beating-heart CABG versus 3.9 ± 1.1 in conventional CABG). No cardiac events occurred in either group during the surgery for malignant tumors. The operative interval between CABG and cancer surgery was significantly shorter in the beating-heart CABG group (21.8 ± 17.9 days in beating-heart CABG versus 53.5 ± 42.9 days in conventional CABG, p < 0.05).Conclusion: Patients with severe coronary artery disease and malignant neoplasms should undergo coronary artery revascularization before the neoplasm is treated. CABG on the beating-heart was safe and effective procedure in those with malignant neoplasms. Key wordscoronary artery bypass grafting–malignant neoplasm–minimally invasive cardiac surgery
    The Japanese Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 04/2012; 48(2):96-100.
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    ABSTRACT: A 76-year-old woman had a chest pain and high fever, and was admitted to the intensive care unit diagnosed as acute pericarditis. Enhanced CT-scan showed a 47-mm aneurysm in the aortic arch which seemed to be impending rupture and the part of the aorta looked like a pseudoaneurysm. Emergent total aortic arch replacement with a rifampicin-bonded Dacron graft was performed. Pericardial effusion was purulent and the aorta was infected with pus discharge in the aortic wall. There were some ulcerations on the surface of the luminal wall of the aorta. One of them was penetrating into the pericardial space causing a pseudoaneurysm. Both pericardial effusion and excised aortic wall were sent to culture study and resulted in positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. The infection of the aorta, with erosion into the pericardial space, seemed to be the cause of purulent pericarditis. Antibiotic therapy was commenced immediately after surgery and continued for four weeks. Though she had neurological deficit after surgery, her infection was well controlled and there was no recurrence of infection 11 months after surgery.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 12/2009; 10(3):459-61. · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a 46-year-old man with a sudden onset of severe back pain following leg pain. An emergent computed tomography showed acute type B aortic dissection. The true lumen was almost completely occluded because of compression of a massive thrombus in the false lumen. The patient developed paraplegia by the time he was taken into the operation room. After induction of anesthesia, partial cardiopulmonary bypass was initiated, and then the chest was opened via left thoracotomy. The entry was found in the distal aortic arch and was successfully repaired. The descending aorta was replaced with a Dacron graft and antegrade re-perfusion was established in the descending aorta three hours after the onset of paraplegia. The patient recovered uneventfully without any neurological deficit. Paraplegia caused by acute type B aortic dissection is a rare complication. Usually it is treated medically. However, if the true lumen is occluded due to a massive thrombus in the false lumen, multiple malperfusion of the distal organs may occur. In such a case, surgical intervention should be considered to resume antegrade perfusion in the descending aorta as soon as possible.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 03/2009; 35(3):547-9. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has come into widespread use with the availability adequate coronary stabilization devices. We studied the efficacy of second-generation coronary stabilization devices (suction device) comparing to the first-generation device (compression device). We prospectively analyzed consecutive patients who underwent isolated off-pump CABG via a midline sternotomy at Shin-Tokyo Hospital Group between July 1, 1996, and August 31, 2000, comparing perioperative, and follow-up data in the group using a suction device (group S) to that in the group using a compression device (group C). Preoperative risk factors were identical between the two groups, with the exception of a higher incidence of three vessel disease in group S. Complete revascularization increased from 47.3% in group C to 88.1% in group S, and the number of distal anastomoses from 2.1 +/- 0.6 in group C to 2.9 +/- 0.9 in group S. Revascularization of the circumflex artery was achieved in 21.7% of group S patients, which was significantly higher than that in group C (2.2%). Postoperative recovery, mortality, and morbidity did not differ significantly between groups. Calculated event-free rates at 2 years was 88.7% in group C and 92.0% in group S (p = NS). Anastomosis to the posterior wall of the heart using the suction device is safe. An increased number of distal anastomoses may reduce the occurrence of cardiac events related to incomplete revascularization.
    The Japanese Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 05/2003; 51(4):130-7.
  • Nihon Kyukyu Igakukai Zasshi 01/2002; 13(3):151-160.
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with renal dysfunction carry a risk of coronary atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with decreased renal function (serum creatinine > or =2.0 mg/dl). We retrospectively analyzed consecutive patients who had undergone isolated CABG at Shin-Tokyo Hospital between May 1, 1991 and April 31, 2000. Preoperative, perioperative, and follow-up data of the non-dialysis-dependent patients with preoperative serum creatinine equal to or more than 2.0mg/dl (group R, n=59) were collected, and compared with those of the control patients (serum creatinine < 2.0, group C, n=1666). Group R was further divided into the off-pump and on-pump CABG group and their perioperative results were compared. Group R included 51 males and eight females with a mean age of 66.4. The mean number of anastomoses was not significantly different between groups; however, clump time and pump time were longer in group R. Postoperative recovery was longer in group R than in group C, which is associated with a more frequent occurrence of major complications (28.8% in group R and 10.7% in group C, P<0.0001) and mortalities (6.8% in group R and 0.5% in group C, P<0.0005). The patients who underwent off-pump CABG experienced relatively faster recovery than those who underwent on-pump CABG, despite decreased renal function. At the mean follow-up of 2.4 years, the actuarial 3-year survival rate of groups R and C were 75.3 and 96.9%, respectively (P<0.0001), excluding hospital mortality. The actuarial 3-year cardiac event-free rate was 76.7% in group R and 87.3% in group C (P<0.05). Patients with decreased renal function carry significant operative risks and require prolonged hospital care. Even after adequate surgical revascularization was completed, the long-term cardiac event-free and survival rates in the patients with renal dysfunction were inferior to the patients with normal renal function.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 09/2001; 20(3):565-72. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To avoid remote cardiac events associated with graft occlusions, arterial conduits are being increasingly utilized in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The development of antispasmic agents has enabled the use of the radial artery as a graft conduit in CABG. Between December 1995 and December 1998, 920 consecutive isolated CABG operations were performed at Shin-Tokyo Hospital. The radial artery was used for graft conduits in 475 of these patients, and their data were analyzed in this study. The patients were followed to determine midterm graft patency, cardiac events, and survival. All data are given as mean +/- standard deviation. The end points were patient death or occurrence of cardiac events. The radial artery was used in 475 patients (366 males and 109 females, with a mean age of 64.5+/-8.5 years). The left internal mammary artery was used in 94.9% of patients, the right internal mammary artery in 17.5%, the gastroepiploic artery in 50.9%, the inferior epigastric artery in 0.2%, and the saphenous vein in 39.2%. The in-hospital morbidity and mortality rates of the studied group were 12.8% and 0.6%, respectively. A major complication related to radial artery harvesting, compartment syndrome of the arm due to postoperative bleeding, was observed in 1 patient. No postoperative myocardial infarction attributable to radial artery bypass was observed. During the late follow-up period of 3.5+/-0.9 years, cardiac events were observed in 63 patients, giving actuarial 2- and 3-year event-free rates of 92.8% and 89.6%, respectively. A total of 24 late deaths were noted, including seven cardiac deaths, giving actuarial 2- and 3-year survival rates of 98.1% and 97.2%, respectively. Postoperative angiography was performed in selected patients. The cumulative graft patency rate of the radial artery was 93.0% during the mean angiographical follow-up period of 1.5+/-1.1 years. No adverse effects were noted after CABG using a radial artery graft in this short- and midterm follow-up period.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 08/2001; 72(1):120-5. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) used to be performed under cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). During the last decade, efforts were made to minimize CPB-related complications. The technique of off-pump CABG (OPCAB) has been established during the last 5 years. Elimination of CPB and OPCAB has successfully reduced a number of perioperative complications and has provided early patient recovery. A compression type of coronary stabilizer was used early phase of OPCAB. Off-pump revascularization using the compression device was limited to the anterior wall of the heart. Bypass to the posterior wall under a beating heart was not popular until the suction type of stabilizer had become available. A suction device assisted by the Lima's pericardial suture allowed us to perform bypass grafting any aspects of the heart. Recently, we are skeltonizing the arterial grafts using the Harmonic scalpel. Applying skeltonizing technique to the radial artery or internal thoracic artery, we can successfully perform sequential grafting in selected cases. The number of distal anastomoses has been gradually increased as the device and technique were advanced (2.1 distal anastomoses with a compression device, 2.9 with a suction device, and 3.2 with the skeltonization technique). The frequency of the complete revascularization also increased. On the other hand, the complications associated with the procedure were comparable among these three off-pump methods, but were significantly fewer than on-pump CABG. Currently performed OPCAB can provide almost same number of distal anastomoses as on-pump CABG, with less frequency of postoperative mortality and morbidity, and with early patient recovery. These favorable results were attributed to the progress of the device and technique.
    Kyobu geka. The Japanese journal of thoracic surgery 05/2001; 54(4):262-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with end-stage renal disease carry a risk of coronary atherosclerosis. This study was performed to evaluate the perioperative and remote data of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in hemodialysis dependent patients. We retrospectively analyzed the results of isolated CABG performed at Shin-Tokyo Hospital between June 1, 1993 and May 31, 2000. Preoperative, perioperative, and follow-up data of the patients on hemodialysis (Group HD, n = 37) were collected and compared with those of control patients (Group C, n = 1,639). Group HD consisted of 26 males and 11 females with a mean age of 59.9 +/- 8.1 years, and the mean number of bypasses was 2.5 +/- 1.1. Group HD had a longer postoperative intubation time, ICU stay, and hospital stay than Group C. The postoperative major complication rate in Group HD (18.9%) was not significantly different from that in Group C (11.3%). However, the inhospital mortality rate in Group HD (5.4%) was higher than Group C (0.6%). At the mean follow-up of 2.4 years, the actuarial 3-year survival of Groups HD and C were 90.6% and 97.6%, respectively (p < 0.001), excluding hospital mortality. The actuarial 3-year cardiac event-free rates were 84.3% in Group HD and 88.8% in Group C, showing no difference. Patients on chronic hemodialysis carry a significant risk of prolonged inhospital care and hospital death. Once successful surgical revascularization was completed, their long-term cardiac events could be controlled as effectively. The increased distant death rates was probably associated with the nature of renal disease.
    Artificial Organs 04/2001; 25(4):239-47. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A mastectomy for breast cancer may alter the selection of grafts or the postoperative outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). To clarify these points, a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent CABG after a mastectomy was undertaken. A total of 19 mastectomy patients (13 left, 6 right, and 1 bilateral mastectomy) were identified prior to CABG, and their perioperative data as well as late outcomes were examined. The studied group consisted of all females with a mean age of 68.8 +/- 6.2 years. The internal mammary artery (IMA) was used in 14 (73.7%) patients; however, there were no patients in whom bilateral IMAs were harvested. Among these 14 patients, an ipsilateral IMA was harvested in 6 and a contralateral IMA in 8. Alternative grafts were selected in 6 patients. A contralateral IMA or other graft conduits were utilized instead of an ipsilateral IMA. There were no in-hospital deaths or sternal wound complications. With a mean follow-up of 2.6 years, 3 patients died (1 cardiac death and 2 noncardiac deaths) and 1 patient developed angina due to de-novo coronary artery stenosis. In patients who have undergone a previous mastectomy, CABG using a single IMA is considered to be safe. If the IMA has good pulsation and if IMA harvesting is not difficult, even after a mastectomy, it can be used as a graft conduit without increasing the risk of sternal wound complications.
    Surgery Today 02/2001; 31(2):113-6. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on the beating heart has become popular procedure in cardiac surgery and its initial results appeared favorable. We report our early and mid-term results of off-pump CABG performed at Shin-Tokyo Hospital. Medical records of patients undergoing off-pump or conventional on-pump CABG from September 1, 1996, to August 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients underwent off-pump CABG were further classified into 2 groups; MIDCAB (Off-pump CABG for single vessel revascularization via a small skin incision) and OPCAB (off-pump CABG mainly approached via midline sternotomy) group. Their preoperative, perioperative, and follow-up data were collected and analyzed. Among a total of 995 cases of CABG, 194 cases were off-pump CABG (male/female 142/52, mean age 66.9). The mean number of distal anastomoses in off-pump CABG was 1.9 +/- 0.9 (1.0 +/- 0.0 in MIDCAB and 2.3 +/- 0.7 in OPCAB), which was significantly fewer than in on-pump CABG (3.6 +/- 1.1), with p < 0.0001. Intubation time (5.3 +/- 5.7 hours in off-pump CABG vs 13.1 +/- 24.2 hours in on-pump CABG), ICU stay (1.7 +/- 1.1 vs 3.2 +/- 3.0 days), and postoperative hospital stay (14.0 +/- 7.9 vs 18.1 +/- 12.1 days) in off-pump CABG were significantly shorter than in on-pump CABG (p < 0.0001). In the off-pump CABG group, there were no in-hospital deaths and 14 major complications, fewer than in on-pump CABG (8 hospital deaths and 114 major complications). Postoperative angiography before hospital discharge was conducted in 80 patients (41.2%) and showed 2 occlusions, giving a graft patency rate of 98.6% in the off-pump group. During follow-up (0.9 +/- 0.6 year) period, there were 5 non-cardiac deaths and 20 cardiac events in the off-pump group. The actuarial survival rate at 36 months was 94.6% for off-pump CABG, showing no significant difference from the rate for conventional CABG patients (95.2% at 36 month, p = NS) The event-free rate was 84.0% at 36 months in off-pump CABG patients; however, which was less favorable than on-pump CABG patients (88.0% at 36 months, p < 0.05). Both in-hospital and mid-term results for off-pump CABG patients were acceptable. Isolated CABG can thus be safely performed without cardiopulmonary bypass. Advances in coronary stabilization have contributed to these improved results. The observed long-term cardiac events may be related to incomplete revascularization.
    The Japanese Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 02/2001; 49(1):67-78.
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    ABSTRACT: We analyzed the risk factors of morbidity and mortality associated with urgent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for impending myocardial infarcton. Among 1,428 consecutive patients who underwent isolated on-pump CABG between 1992 and 1998, a total of 126 were urgent cases. Their inhospital and long-term data were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method or logistic model. The mean number of grafts performed during urgent CABG was 3.2, and arterial reconstruction was performed in 117 (93.9%) cases. Major postoperative complicatons occurred in 64 cases (50.8%), and there were 9 inhospital deaths (7.1%). Significant predictor of inhospital death, identified by multivariate analysis, was a history of cerebral vascular accident. During a mean follow-up period of 3.1 years, there was a total of 7 remote deaths giving an actuarial 5-year survival rate of 93.5% (excluding inhospital deaths). Remote cardiac events occurred in 23 patients, giving an actuarial 5-year event-free rate of 74.8%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that risk factors influencing cardiac events were poor left ventricular function, preoperative renal dysfunction, postoperative use of intra-aortic balloon pumping, and postoperative induction of dialysis, while those influencing survival were previous myocardial infarction. Comparing elective CABG performed in the same period, the inhospital mortality of urgent cases was 33.8 times higher. Among hospital-survivors, patients after urgent CABG demonstrated fair long-term survival and future development of cardiac events. All efforts to achieve complete revascularization and frequent use of the internal mammary artery may contribute to improving the long-term results; however, careful management is necessary for patients with poor cardiac function.
    International Journal of Angiology 01/2001; 10(2):117-126.
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    ABSTRACT: The indication for off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have been expanded as development of the off-pump device has progressed. We present a case of four-vessel revascularization with total arterial graft under a beating heart. All conduits were in situ or composite, and bypass was performed with aorta non-touch technique. Off-pump bypass using in situ quadruple arterial conduits may contribute to a reduction of incidence of perioperative strokes and reduction of the postoperative cardiac events.
    Annals of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery: official journal of the Association of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons of Asia 01/2001; 6(6):405-7. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular malformations are frequently observed in Turner's syndrome. Bicuspid aortic valve and coarctation of the aorta are commonly associated with Turner's syndrome whereas aortic dissection is rare but its rupture results in death. We experienced a case of ruptured dissecting aneurysm (Stanford type A) in a 30-year-old female with Turner's syndrome. Emergent total arch replacement was performed successfully. A literature review revealed 32 cases of aortic dissection in patients with Turner's syndrome, including 15 cases of rupture. However, survival after rupture was reported only two cases. To our knowledge, this report descries the third known case of successful surgical management of ruptured aortic dissection in Turner's syndrome.
    Annals of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery: official journal of the Association of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons of Asia 09/2000; 6(4):275-80. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in elderly patients has been increasing. We retrospectively analyzed the results of CABG performed at Shin-Tokyo Hospital between January 1, 1991, and December 31, 1998. Preoperative, perioperative, and follow-up data of patients > or = 75 years old (group E, n = 190) were collected, and compared with those of patients < 75 years old (group Y, n = 1,380). Female gender, emergent CABG, preoperative balloon pumping use, cardiogenic shock, hypertension, and preoperative cerebral vascular accident were significantly more frequent in group E (p < 0.05). CABG was completed without any significant differences, except for less frequent use of the bilateral internal mammary artery (p < 0.01), more frequent use of the saphenous vein (p < 0.005), and a greater incidence of blood transfusion in group E (p < 0.0001). The postoperative course required longer intubation, ICU stay, and postoperative hospital stay in group E (p < 0.001), and was more frequently associated with major complication (p < 0.0001) and in-hospital death (p < 0.05). During the mean follow-up of 2.7 years (maximum 6.9 years), the actuarial 5-year survival of groups E and Y were 84.3% and 92.5% (p < 0.01), respectively, excluding in-hospital mortality. The actuarial 5-year cardiac event-free rates were 79.9% in group E and 79.7% in group Y, showing no significant difference. CABG in the elderly carries certain surgical risks. However, the long-term cardiac event-free rate after CABG in the elderly was almost the same as that of younger patients. Inferior long-term survival in the elderly was most likely due to the biological nature of aging.
    Chest 06/2000; 117(5):1262-70. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on a beating-heart has gained the attention of cardiac surgeons and shown favorable initial results. However, only a few follow-up results have been reported. We report herein our one-year experiences of off-pump CABG performed at Shin-Tokyo Hospital. Retrospective chart review was performed for patients who underwent off-pump CABG and conventional isolated CABG between 01/01/98 and 12/31/98. Preoperative, perioperative, and follow-up data were collected. Among 315 cases of isolated CABG, 94 cases were off-pump CABG (male/female 69/25, mean age 67.7). Mean number of distal anastomoses performed by off-pump CABG was 1.7 +/- 0.7 (42 cases of single-vessel revascularization and 52 cases of more than double- vessel revascularization). In off-pump CABG, there were no hospital deaths and 6 major complications including 2 incidences of perioperative myocardial infarction. Postoperative angiography before hospital discharge was performed in 56 patients (59.6%, 98 anastomosis) and revealed 5 occlusions, giving a graft patency rate of 94.9%. During the follow-up (11.4 +/- 4.1 months), there was 1 late non-cardiac death and 11 cardiac events. The event-free rate at 18 months was 94.0% in off-pump CABG, showing no significant difference from the event-free rate after conventional CABG (94.0% at 18 months, p = 0.135). Follow-up angiography was performed in 21 patients (33 anastomoses) at a mean interval of 3.6 months and showed 4 graft occlusions, giving a patency rate of 92.7%. Both hospital and early results of off-pump CABG were acceptable. Off-pump CABG can be safely performed in selected patients.
    Annals of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery: official journal of the Association of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons of Asia 05/2000; 6(2):110-8. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can be treated with thrombolysis or coronary catheter intervention; surgical treatment--coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)--is reserved for the patients in whom other procedures have failed. We performed CABG in 47 patients during the evolving phase of AMI, and analyzed their short-term and long-term results. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were analyzed in patients who underwent emergency CABGs for AMI between January 1, 1992, and July 31, 1998. CABGs performed more than 7 days after AMI were excluded from this study. The subjects were 47 patients (33 males and 14 females) with AMI who were treated by emergency CABG. Intraaortic balloon pumping was used in 44 cases and percutaneous circulatory pulmonary support was used in 3 cases. The mean interval between the onset of AMI and surgery was 27.4 +/- 27.9 hours. The mean number of bypass grafts was 3.0 +/- 1.1, and at least 1 arterial conduit was used in 45 cases (95.7%). Aortic clamp time, pump time, and operative time were 64.7 +/- 31.7, 117.3 +/- 55.2, and 313.2 +/- 84.8 minutes, respectively. IABP or percutaneous cardiopulmonary support were removed in the intensive care unit (ICU) 30.0 +/- 28.9 hours after CABG. The patients were extubated 41.4 +/- 40.5 hours after surgery, remained in ICU for 4.7 +/- 2.7 days, and were discharged from the hospital after 27.0 +/- 22.5 days. Three patients died from multiorgan failure related to postoperative sepsis, and 8 cases of major complications were observed. The actuarial 5-year survival rate of the patients treated with CABG was 83.0%. Surgical treatment in the unstable patients after AMI can be performed with acceptable risk. Arterial revascularization may contribute to improvement in long-term results.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 03/2000; 69(2):425-8. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) prior to noncardiac major surgery has effectively decreases short- and long-term mortality related to coronary ischemia. Coronary artery bypass on the beating heart is conducted to avoid the risk of cardiopulmonary bypass and it has contribute to shorten recovery time. Subjects were 19 patients with malignant neoplasm for whom a retrospective chart review was made between Jan. 1, 1992 and July 31, 1998. In the early phase of this study, between Jan. 1, 1992, and Dec. 31, 1997, CABG was performed using cardiopulmonary bypass, and late phase, between Jan. 1, 1998, and July 1, 1998, CABG was done on the beating heart without cardiopulmonary bypass. Conventional CABG was performed in 12 patients with neoplasms (10 male and 2 female, age 64.7 +/- 6.1 years), and CABG on the beating heart was performed in 7 patients (6 male and 1 female, age 68.0 +/- 7.5 years). Fewer number of bypass grafts were made in the beating-heart CABG group (1.3 +/- 0.5 in beating-heart CABG versus 3.9 +/- 1.1 in conventional CABG). No cardiac events occurred in either group during the surgery for malignant tumors. The operative interval between CABG and cancer surgery was significantly shorter in the beating-heart CABG group (21.8 +/- 17.9 days in beating-heart CABG versus 53.5 +/- 42.9 days in conventional CABG, p < 0.05). Patients with severe coronary artery disease and malignant neoplasms should undergo coronary artery revascularization before the neoplasm is treated. CABG on the beating-heart was safe and effective procedure in those with malignant neoplasms.
    The Japanese Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 02/2000; 48(2):96-100.
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    ABSTRACT: We experienced a rare case of delayed cardiac tamponade after minimally invasive coronary artery bypass (MIDCAB). Pericardial effusion was successfully drained under ultrasonic guidance.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 11/1999; 16(4):487-8. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on a beating heart has been successfully performed for high risk patients, and is known to be less invasive than conventional CABG using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We expanded the indication of beating-heart CABG in patients requiring emergency coronary revascularization. A retrospective chart review was performed for patients who had undergone emergency CABG on a beating heart (EM-BH group), elective CABG on a beating heart (Elective-BH group) and emergency CABG under CPB (EM-CPB group), between January 1, 1997 and June 30, 1998. Four cases (1 male and 3 females with a mean age of 67.8 +/- 5.4) in the EM-BH group, 67 cases (48 males and 19 females with mean age of 67.3 +/- 7.8) in the Elective-BH group, and 41 cases (29 males and 12 females with mean age of 63.3 +/- 10.4) in the EM-CPB group were analyzed. The number of the grafts was 1.75 +/- 0.50 in EM-BH group, 1.37 +/- 0.55 in the Elective-BH group, and 2.95 +/- 1.07 in the EM-CPB group. The intubation period, ICU stay, and the postoperative hospital stay were significantly shorter in the EM-BH group (6.0 hours intubation, 1.5 days ICU stay, and 11.5 days postoperative hospital stay) and Elective-BH group (6.8 +/- 11.0 hours intubation, 1.6 +/- 1.5 days ICU stay, and 12.7 +/- 5.2 days postoperative hospital stay) than in the EM-CPB group (20.1 +/- 22.5 hours intubation, 3.6 +/- 2.4 days ICU stay, and 21.8 +/- 14.9 days postoperative hospital stay). The postoperative recovery period for EM-BH patients was almost the same as that for elective cases of beating-heart CABG, and was significantly shorter than that of conventional emergency CABG under CPB. Selected patients with coronary ischemia can be safely treated by beating-heart surgery.
    Annals of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery: official journal of the Association of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons of Asia 11/1999; 5(5):304-9. · 0.47 Impact Factor