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Publications (6)77.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Genomic amplifications and deletions, the consequence of somatic variation, are a hallmark of human cancer. Such variation has also been observed between "normal" individuals, as well as in individuals with congenital disorders. Thus, copy number measurement is likely to be an important tool for the analysis of genetic variation, genetic disease, and cancer. We developed representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis, a high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization methodology, with this aim in mind, and reported its use in the study of humans. Here we report the development of a representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis microarray for the genomic analysis of the mouse, an important model system for many genetic diseases and cancer. This microarray was designed based on the sequence assembly MM3, and contains approximately 84,000 probes randomly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We demonstrate the use of this array to identify copy number changes in mouse cancers, as well to determine copy number variation between inbred strains of mice. Because restriction endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA is an integral component of our method, differences due to polymorphisms at the restriction enzyme cleavage sites are also observed between strains, and these can be useful to follow the inheritance of loci between crosses of different strains.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2006; 103(30):11234-9. · 9.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The heterogeneity and instability of human tumors hamper straightforward identification of cancer-causing mutations through genomic approaches alone. Herein we describe a mouse model of liver cancer initiated from progenitor cells harboring defined cancer-predisposing lesions. Genome-wide analyses of tumors in this mouse model and in human hepatocellular carcinomas revealed a recurrent amplification at mouse chromosome 9qA1, the syntenic region of human chromosome 11q22. Gene-expression analyses delineated cIAP1, a known inhibitor of apoptosis, and Yap, a transcription factor, as candidate oncogenes in the amplicon. In the genetic context of their amplification, both cIAP1 and Yap accelerated tumorigenesis and were required to sustain rapid growth of amplicon-containing tumors. Furthermore, cIAP1 and Yap cooperated to promote tumorigenesis. Our results establish a tractable model of liver cancer, identify two oncogenes that cooperate by virtue of their coamplification in the same genomic locus, and suggest an efficient strategy for the annotation of human cancer genes.
    Cell 07/2006; 125(7):1253-67. · 31.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used extensively to identify the genetic requirements for proper nervous system development and function. Key to this process is the direction of vesicles to the growing axons and dendrites, which is required for growth-cone extension and synapse formation in the developing neurons. The contribution and mechanism of membrane traffic in neuronal development are not fully understood, however. We show that the C. elegans gene unc-69 is required for axon outgrowth, guidance, fasciculation and normal presynaptic organization. We identify UNC-69 as an evolutionarily conserved 108-amino-acid protein with a short coiled-coil domain. UNC-69 interacts physically with UNC-76, mutations in which produce similar defects to loss of unc-69 function. In addition, a weak reduction-of-function allele, unc-69(ju69), preferentially causes mislocalization of the synaptic vesicle marker synaptobrevin. UNC-69 and UNC-76 colocalize as puncta in neuronal processes and cooperate to regulate axon extension and synapse formation. The chicken UNC-69 homolog is highly expressed in the developing central nervous system, and its inactivation by RNA interference leads to axon guidance defects. We have identified a novel protein complex, composed of UNC-69 and UNC-76, which promotes axonal growth and normal presynaptic organization in C. elegans. As both proteins are conserved through evolution, we suggest that the mammalian homologs of UNC-69 and UNC-76 (SCOCO and FEZ, respectively) may function similarly.
    Journal of Biology 02/2006; 5(4):9.
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    Jack T Zilfou, Mona S Spector, Scott W Lowe
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    ABSTRACT: In response to DNA damage, the tumor suppressor p53 elicits a complex cellular response. In this issue of Cell, Wu et al. (2005) show that the transcription factor SLUG is induced by p53 and protects hematopoietic progenitor cells from apoptosis triggered by DNA damage. SLUG exerts this protective role by repressing Puma, a proapoptotic target of p53. PUMA is also a key coordinator of apoptosis mediated by both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions of p53 (Chi-puk et al., 2005).
    Cell 12/2005; 123(4):545-8. · 31.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatocellular carcinoma is a chemoresistant cancer and a leading cause of cancer mortality; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the aggressive nature of this disease are poorly understood. In this study, we developed a new liver cancer mouse model that is based on the ex vivo genetic manipulation of embryonic liver progenitor cells (hepatoblasts). After retroviral gene transfer of oncogenes or short hairpin RNAs targeting tumor suppressor genes, genetically altered liver progenitor cells are seeded into the liver of otherwise normal recipient mice. We show that histopathology of the engineered liver carcinomas reveals features of the human disease. Furthermore, representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA) of murine liver tumors initiated by two defined genetic hits revealed spontaneously acquired genetic alterations that are characteristic for human hepatocellular carcinoma. This model provides a powerful platform for applications like cancer gene discovery or high-throughput preclinical drug testing.
    Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 02/2005; 70:251-61.
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    ABSTRACT: Programmed cell death occurs in every multicellular organism and in diverse cell types yet the genetic controls that define which cells will live and which will die remain poorly understood. During development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the coordinated activity of four gene products, EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4 and CED-3, results in the death of essentially all cells fated to die. To identify novel upstream components of the cell death pathway, we performed a genetic screen for mutations that abolish the death of the hermaphrodite-specific neurons (HSNs), a homologous pair of cells required for egg-laying in the hermaphrodite. We identified and cloned the genes, eor-1 and eor-2, which are required to specify the fate of cell death in male HSNs. In addition to defects in HSN death, mutation of either gene leads to defects in coordinated movement, neuronal migration, male tail development, and viability; all consistent with abnormal neuronal differentiation. eor-1 encodes a putative transcription factor related to the human oncogene PLZF. eor-2 encodes a novel but conserved protein. We propose that eor-1 and eor-2 function together throughout the nervous system to promote terminal differentiation of neurons and function specifically in male HSNs to promote apoptotic death of the HSNs.
    Developmental Biology 11/2004; 274(1):125-38. · 3.87 Impact Factor