Miguel Andújar

Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular - Materno Infantil de Canarias, Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain

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Publications (3)35.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Contribution over time of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in human cancers has been poorly documented. Such data is fundamental to measure current HPV vaccines impact in the years to come. We estimated the HPV type-specific distribution in a large international series of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) over 70 years prior to vaccination. Paraffin embedded ICC cases diagnosed between 1940 and 2007 were retrieved from eleven countries in Central-South America, Asia and Europe. Included countries reported to have low-medium cervical cancer screening uptake. Information on age at and year of diagnosis was collected from medical records. After histological confirmation, HPV DNA detection was performed by SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 (version1). Logistic regression models were used for estimating the adjusted relative contributions (RC) of HPV16 and of HPV18 over time. Among 4,771 HPV DNA positive ICC cases, HPV16 and HPV18 were the two most common HPVs in all the decades with no statistically significant variations of their adjusted-RC from 1940–59 to 2000–07 (HPV16—from 61.5 to 62.1%, and HPV18—from 6.9 to 7.2%). As well, the RC of other HPV types did not varied over time. In the stratified analysis by histology, HPV16 adjusted-RC significantly increased across decades in adenocarcinomas. Regarding age, cases associated to either HPV16, 18 or 45 were younger than those with other HPV types in all the evaluated decades. The observed stability on the HPV type distribution predicts a high and stable impact of HPV vaccination in reducing the cervical cancer burden in future vaccinated generations.
    International Journal of Cancer 12/2013; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is critical to guide the introduction and to assess the impact of HPV prophylactic vaccines. This study aims to provide specific information for Spain. 1043 histological confirmed ICC cases diagnosed from 1940 to 2007 from six Spanish regions were assembled. HPV DNA detection was performed by SPF(10) broad-spectrum PCR followed by deoxyribonucleic acid enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by reverse hybridization line probe assay (LiPA(25)) (version 1). Of 1043 ICC cases, 904 were HPV DNA positive (adjusted prevalence: 89.1%). The eight most common types, in decreasing order, were HPV 16, 18, 33, 31, 45, 35, 52 and 56, accounting for more than 90% of cases. HPV 16 and 18 contributed to 72.4% of all HPV positive ICC cases. In cervical adenocarcinomas, this contribution increased up to 94%. HPV 16 and 18 relative contributions showed a stable pattern over the 60 year study period. HPV 45, 18 and 16-positive ICC cases presented at younger ages than cases with other HPV types (adjusted mean age: 43.8, 45.2, 52.6 and 57.7 years, respectively). HPV 16 and 18 accounted together for a 72.4% of positive cases, with no statistically significant changes in their relative contributions over the last decades. In 94% of cervical adenocarcinomas we identified at least one of the two HPV types included in the current vaccines (HPV 16/18). Results suggest a major impact of HPV vaccines on reduction of ICC burden in Spain in the HPV vaccinated cohorts.
    Gynecologic Oncology 11/2011; 124(3):512-7. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Knowledge about the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in invasive cervical cancer is crucial to guide the introduction of prophylactic vaccines. We aimed to provide novel and comprehensive data about the worldwide genotype distribution in patients with invasive cervical cancer. Paraffin-embedded samples of histologically confirmed cases of invasive cervical cancer were collected from 38 countries in Europe, North America, central South America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania. Inclusion criteria were a pathological confirmation of a primary invasive cervical cancer of epithelial origin in the tissue sample selected for analysis of HPV DNA, and information about the year of diagnosis. HPV detection was done by use of PCR with SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping with a reverse hybridisation line probe assay. Sequence analysis was done to characterise HPV-positive samples with unknown HPV types. Data analyses included algorithms of multiple infections to estimate type-specific relative contributions. 22,661 paraffin-embedded samples were obtained from 14,249 women. 10,575 cases of invasive cervical cancer were included in the study, and 8977 (85%) of these were positive for HPV DNA. The most common HPV types were 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, and 58 with a combined worldwide relative contribution of 8196 of 8977 (91%, 95% CI 90-92). HPV types 16 and 18 were detected in 6357 of 8977 of cases (71%, 70-72) of invasive cervical cancer. HPV types 16, 18, and 45 were detected in 443 of 470 cases (94%, 92-96) of cervical adenocarcinomas. Unknown HPV types that were identified with sequence analysis were 26, 30, 61, 67, 69, 82, and 91 in 103 (1%) of 8977 cases of invasive cervical cancer. Women with invasive cervical cancers related to HPV types 16, 18, or 45 presented at a younger mean age than did those with other HPV types (50·0 years [49·6-50·4], 48·2 years [47·3-49·2], 46·8 years [46·6-48·1], and 55·5 years [54·9-56·1], respectively). To our knowledge, this study is the largest assessment of HPV genotypes to date. HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, and 58 should be given priority when the cross-protective effects of current vaccines are assessed, and for formulation of recommendations for the use of second-generation polyvalent HPV vaccines. Our results also suggest that type-specific high-risk HPV-DNA-based screening tests and protocols should focus on HPV types 16, 18, and 45.
    The Lancet Oncology 10/2010; 11(11):1048-56. · 25.12 Impact Factor