Mercedes de la Torre

University of A Coruña, La Corogne, Galicia, Spain

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Publications (23)24.17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We introduce the training on uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy in sheep. This animal model is helpful to learn the different view, the importance of lung exposure and the key points of the instrumentation. In this article we present three videos with the left upper lobectomy, the left lower lobectomy and the right upper lobectomy in the sheep.
    Journal of thoracic disease. 10/2014; 6(Suppl 6):S656-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Since the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomic lobectomy for lung cancer was described two decades ago, many units have successfully adopted this technique. VATS lobectomy is a safe and effective approach for the treatment not only of early stage lung cancer but also for more advanced disease. It represents a technical challenge. As the surgeon's experience grows, more complex or advanced cases are approached using the VATS approach. However, as VATS lobectomy has been applied to more advanced cases, the rate of conversion to open thoracotomy has increased, particularly early in the surgeon's learning curve, mostly due to the occurrence of complications. The best strategy for facing complications of VATS lobectomy is to prevent them from happening. Avoiding complications is subject to an appropriate preoperative workup and patient selection. Planning for a VATS resection as safely as possible involves the consideration of the patient´s characteristics and the anticipated technical aspects of the case. Awareness of the possibility of intraoperative complications of VATS lobectomy is mandatory to avoid them, and the development of management strategies is necessary to limit morbidity if they occur.
    Journal of thoracic disease. 10/2014; 6(Suppl 6):S669-73.
  • Journal of thoracic disease. 10/2014; 6(Suppl 6):S599-603.
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    ABSTRACT: Lymphadenectomy is an important part of lung cancer surgery. At the moment, video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) is the most common approach to remove these tumors, when it is technically possible. With our current experience in VATS in major resections we have obtained a radical videothoracoscopic mediastinal lymphadenectomy, and single-port provides us with the best anatomic instrumentation and a direct view.
    Journal of thoracic disease. 10/2014; 6(Suppl 6):S665-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Thanks to the recent improvements in thoracoscopy, a great deal of complex lung resections can be performed without performing thoracotomies. During the last years, experience gained through video-assisted thoracoscopic techniques, enhancement of the surgical instruments and improvement of high definition cameras have been the greatest advances. The huge number of surgical videos posting on specialized websites, live surgery events and experimental courses has contributed to the rapid learning of minimally invasive surgery during the last years. Nowadays, complex resections, such as post chemo-radiotherapy resections, lobectomies with chest wall resection, bronchial and vascular sleeves are being performed by thoracoscopic approach in experienced centers. Additionally, surgery has evolved regarding the thoracoscopic surgical approach, allowing us to perform these difficult procedures by means of a small single incision, with excellent postoperative results.
    Journal of thoracic disease. 10/2014; 6(Suppl 6):S674-81.
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    ABSTRACT: The surgical approach to lung resections is evolving constantly. Since the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomic lobectomy for lung cancer was described two decades ago, many units have successfully adopted this technique. The VATS lobectomy can be defined as the individual dissection of veins, arteries and bronchus, with a mediastinal lymphadenectomy, using a videothoracoscopic approach visualized on screen and involving 2 to 4 incisions or ports, with no rib spreading. However, the surgery can be performed by only one incision with similar outcomes. Since 2010, when the uniportal approach was introduced for major pulmonary resections, the technique has been spreading worldwide. This technique provides a direct view of the target tissue. The parallel instrumentation achieved during the single-port approach mimics the maneuvers performed during open surgery. It represents a less invasive approach than the multiport technique, and minimizes the compression of the intercostal nerve. As the surgeon's experience with the uniportal VATS lobectomy grows, more complex cases can be performed by using this approach, thus expanding the indications for single-incision thoracoscopic lobectomy.
    Journal of thoracic disease. 10/2014; 6(Suppl 6):S660-4.
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    ABSTRACT: General anaesthesia with single-lung ventilation was always considered a condition for thoracoscopic major pulmonary resections. However, nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy has been reported recently by using conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), epidural anaesthesia and vagus blockade. Here, we present a technique that reduces the surgical access trauma even more: single-incision VATS approach with no need for epidural or vagus blockade in a nonintubated patient.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 07/2014; · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung cancer requiring double bronchial and vascular reconstruction of the pulmonary artery is a challenging procedure usually performed by thoracotomy. However, recent development of video-assisted thoracoscopic techniques allows experienced and skilled surgeons to perform these cases through a minimally invasive approach. Most of these complex thoracoscopic resections are performed by using 3 to 4 incisions. We present the first report of a right side combined vascular reconstruction and bronchoplasty performed through a single-incision video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) technique.
    Journal of thoracic disease. 06/2014; 6(6):861-3.
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy for advanced lung cancer is a feasible and safe surgery in experienced centers. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of uniportal VATS approach in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and compare the perioperative outcomes and survival with those in early-stage tumors operated through the uniportal approach.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 06/2014; 6(6):641-8. · 1.11 Impact Factor
  • Article: Reply.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 08/2013; 96(2):745. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) was introduced nearly 2 decades ago and has experienced an exponential increase for lung cancer treatment. A pneumonectomy can be performed by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and the lung usually fits through the incision as usually used for VATS lobectomy. The most common approach for pneumonectomy is undertaken with 3 or 4 incisions, including a utility incision of about 3-6 cm. However, this resection is amenable by using only a single utility-incision. This chapter describes the technique for pneumonectomies by single-incision thoracoscopic approach with no rib spreading.
    Journal of thoracic disease. 08/2013; 5(Suppl 3):S246-52.
  • Journal of thoracic disease. 08/2013; 5(Suppl 3):S226-33.
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past two decades, video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has revolutionized the way thoracic surgeons diagnose and treat lung diseases. The major advance in VATS procedures is related to the major pulmonary resections. The best VATS technique for lobectomy has not been well defined yet. Most of the authors describe the VATS approach to lobectomy via 3 to 4 incisions but the surgery can be performed by only one incision with similar outcomes. This single incision is the same as we normally use for VATS lobectomies performed by double or triple port technique with no rib spreading. As our experience with VATS lobectomy has grown, we have gradually improved the technique for a less invasive approach. Consequently the greater the experience we gained, the more complex the cases we performed were, hence expanding the indications for single-incision thoracoscopic lobectomy.
    Journal of thoracic disease. 08/2013; 5(Suppl 3):S234-45.
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    ABSTRACT: The Spanish Lung Transplant Registry (SLTR) began its activities in 2006 with the participation of all the lung transplantation (LT) groups with active programs in Spain. This report presents for the first time an overall description and results of the patients who received lung transplants in Spain from 2006 to 2010. LT activity has grown progressively, and in this time period 951 adults and 31 children underwent lung transplantation. The mean age of the recipients was 48.2, while the mean age among the lung donors was 41.7. In adult LT, the most frequent cause for lung transplantation was emphysema/COPD, followed by idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, both representing more than 60% the total number of indications. The probability for survival after adult LT to one and three years was 72% and 60%, respectively, although in patients who survived until the third month post-transplantation, these survival rates reached 89.7% and 75.2%. The factors that most clearly influenced patient survival were the age of the recipient and the diagnosis that indicated the transplantation. Among the pediatric transplantations, cystic fibrosis was the main cause for transplantation (68%), with a one-year survival of 80% and a three-year survival of 70%. In adult as well as pediatric transplantations, the most frequent cause of death was infection.These data confirm the consolidated situation of LT in Spain as a therapeutic option for advanced chronic respiratory disease, both in children as well as in adults.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología. 02/2013; 49(2):70–78.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A video-assisted thoracoscopic approach to lobectomy varies among surgeons. Typically, 3 to 4 incisions are made. Our approach has evolved from a 3-port to a 2-port approach to a single 4- to 5-cm incision with no rib spreading. We report results with single-incision video-assisted thoracic major pulmonary resections during our first 2 years of experience. METHODS: In June 2010, we began performing video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomies through a uniportal approach (no rib spreading). By July 12, 2012, 102 patients had undergone this single-incision approach. RESULTS: Of 102 attempted major resections, 97 were successfully completed with a single incision (operations in 3 patients were converted to open surgery and 2 patients needed 1 additional incision). Five uniportal pneumonectomies were not included in the study. We have analyzed early outcomes of successful uniportal lobectomies (92 patients studied). Right upper lobectomy was the most frequent resection (28 cases). Mean surgical time was 154.1 ± 46 minutes (range, 60-310 minutes), mean number of lymph nodes was 14.5 ± 7 (range, 5-38 nodes), and mean number of explored nodal stations was 4.6 ± 1.2 (range, 3-8 stations). The mean tumor size was 2.8 ± 1.5 cm (0-6.5 cm). The median duration of time a chest tube was in place was 2 days and the median length of hospital stay was 3 days. There were complications in 14 patients; no postoperative 30-day mortality was reported. CONCLUSIONS: Single-incision video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomic resection is a feasible and safe procedure with good perioperative results, especially when performed by surgeons experienced with the double-port technique and anterior thoracotomy.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 12/2012; · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Spanish Lung Transplant Registry (SLTR) began its activities in 2006 with the participation of all the lung transplantation (LT) groups with active programs in Spain. This report presents for the first time an overall description and results of the patients who received lung transplants in Spain from 2006 to 2010. LT activity has grown progressively, and in this time period 951 adults and 31 children underwent lung transplantation. The mean age of the recipients was 48.2, while the mean age among the lung donors was 41.7. In adult LT, the most frequent cause for lung transplantation was emphysema/COPD, followed by idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, both representing more than 60% the total number of indications. The probability for survival after adult LT to one and three years was 72% and 60%, respectively, although in patients who survived until the third month post-transplantation, these survival rates reached 89.7% and 75.2%. The factors that most clearly influenced patient survival were the age of the recipient and the diagnosis that indicated the transplantation. Among the pediatric transplantations, cystic fibrosis was the main cause for transplantation (68%), with a one-year survival of 80% and a three-year survival of 70%. In adult as well as pediatric transplantations, the most frequent cause of death was infection. These data confirm the consolidated situation of LT in Spain as a therapeutic option for advanced chronic respiratory disease, both in children as well as in adults.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología 08/2012; · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The most common approach for Video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy is undertaken with three or four incisions, including a utility incision of about 3-5 cm. However, major pulmonary resections are amenable by using only a single utility incision. This video shows the technical procedure of a right pneumonectomy by single-incision approach with no rib spreading. A 52-year-old woman was proposed for single-incision VATS resection of a 5-cm right lower lobe adenocarcinoma. A 4-cm incision was made in the fifth intercostal space. We placed a 30-degree, high-definition, 10-mm thoracoscope in the posterior anterior part of the incision. Digital palpation confirmed that the tumor involved the fissure and the posterior portion of the upper lobe, which indicated the need for right pneumonectomy. We inserted the instruments through the anterior part of the utility incision to start the detachment of the right upper lobe by using a harmonic scalpel. The first step was dissecting the inferior pulmonary vein. The hilar structures were exposed by using harmonic scalpel and a long dissector (Fig. 1A). The upper and middle-lobe pulmonary veins were dissected and transected, allowing visualization of truncus anterior, which was then stapled. The inferior pulmonary vein and the intermediate truncus artery were divided, allowing optimal exposure to the main bronchus, which was stapled. The lung was removed in a protective bag by adding 1 cm to the incision, and a systematic lymph node dissection was performed. A single chest tube was placed in the posterior part of the utility incision. Total surgery time was 210 min. The chest tube was removed on postoperative day 2 (Fig. 1B), and the patient was discharged home on day 4 with no complications. Single-port VATS pneumonectomy for selected cases is a feasible procedure, especially when performed from a center with previous experience in double-port VATS approach. Recent advances in surgical and video-assisted techniques have allowed minimally invasive pneumonectomy to be undertaken safely. VATS pneumonectomy is not a new procedure and in fact was initially reported 15 years ago and was felt to result in less postoperative pain and a faster return to normal activities [1]. Despite this, there have been only a few case reports or series published of VATS pneumonectomies [2, 3].
    Surgical Endoscopy 01/2012; 26(7):2078-9. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past two decades, video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has revolutionized the way thoracic surgeons diagnose and treat lung diseases. The major advance in VATS procedures is related to the major pulmonary resections. The optimal VATS technique for lobectomy in lung cancer has not been well defined yet. Most of the authors describe the VATS approach to lobectomy via three to four incisions, but the surgery can be performed by only one incision with similar outcomes. This single incision is the same as we normally use for VATS lobectomies performed by double- or triple-port technique, with no rib spreading. As our experience with VATS lobectomy has grown, we have gradually improved the technique for a less-invasive approach. Consequently, the greater the experience we gained, the more complex the cases we performed were, thus expanding the indications for single-incision thoracoscopic lobectomy.
    Multimedia Manual of Cardiothoracic Surgery 01/2012; 2012:mms007.
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    ABSTRACT: Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) anatomic lobectomy for lung cancer was initially described in 1993. Since then, many thoracic surgery departments have progressively adopted this technique, although the approach description may vary greatly among them. Most of surgeons use three incisions but the lobectomy can be performed by only one port, especially when it is performed by surgeons experienced in double-port technique. Lower lobes are the easiest cases to perform. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a single-port upper lobectomy with no rib spreading.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 08/2011; 13(5):539-41. · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present guidelines have been prepared with the consensus of at least one representative of each of the hospitals with lung transplantation programs in Spain. In addition, prior to their publication, these guidelines have been reviewed by a group of prominent reviewers who are recognized for their professional experience in the field of lung transplantation. Within the following pages, the reader will find the selection criteria for lung transplantation candidates, when and how to remit a patient to a transplantation center and, lastly, when to add the patient to the waiting list. A level of evidence has been identified for the most relevant questions. Our intention is for this document to be a practical guide for pulmonologists who do not directly participate in lung transplantations but who should consider this treatment for their patients. Finally, these guidelines also propose an information form in order to compile in an organized manner the patient data of the potential candidate for lung transplantation, which are relevant in order to be able to make the best decisions possible.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología 06/2011; 47(6):303-9. · 2.17 Impact Factor