Manas Ranjan Ray

Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, Kolkata, Bengal, India

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Publications (52)88.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: The impact of chronic exposure to smoke from biomass burning on respiratory health has been examined. Six-hundred and eighty-one non-smoking women (median age 35 years) from eastern India who cook exclusively with biomass (wood, dung and crop residues) and 438 age-matched women from similar neighborhood who cook with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) were examined. Pulmonary function test was done by spirometry. The concentrations of particulate matter having diameter of < 10 µm (PM10) and < 2.5 µm (PM2.5) in indoor air was measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Compared with LPG users, biomass users had greater prevalence of upper (50.9 versus 28.5%) and lower respiratory symptoms (71.8 versus 30.8%) and dyspnea (58.4 versus 19.9%). They showed reduction in all parameters measured by spirometer especially in mid-expiratory volume. PM10 and PM2.5 concentration in biomass using kitchen were 2-3-times more than LPG-using kitchen, and the decline in spirometry values was positively associated PM10 and PM2.5 levels in indoor air after controlling education, family income and kitchen location as potential confounders. Overall, 29.7% of biomass users and 16.4% of LPG users had deficient lung function, and restrictive type of deficiency was predominant. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was diagnosed in 4.6% of biomass and 0.9% of LPG users. Women who predominantly used dung cake and did not possess separate kitchen had poorer lung function. Cumulative exposure to biomass smoke causes lung function decrement and facilitates COPD development even in non-smoking and relatively young pre-menopausal women.
    Inhalation Toxicology 12/2014; 26(14):866-72. · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neurobehavioral symptoms were prevalent in arsenic (11–50 μg/L) exposed women.•Plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine were elevated in them.•They exhibited high plasma serotonin but low intraplatelet serotonin.•They were also observed with increased number of P-selectin-expressing platelets.•Depression was positively associated with these women.
    NeuroToxicology 10/2014; · 3.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Air pollution ranks among the leading risk factors contributing to the burden of disease in South Asia with household and ambient air pollution accounting for 6 percent and 3 percent respectively of the total national burden of disease in India. Both urban and rural communities bear this burden in terms of premature mortality and disability adjusted life years, resulting from excess risks of communicable and non-communicable diseases. We review the information pertaining to exposures to fine particulate matter and air toxics together with the attributable disease burden estimates. We also provide a summary of the results from recent assessments on carcinogenicity of ambient and household air pollution conducted by The International Agency for Research on Cancer. We conclude with a list of specific priorities for action related to air toxics and cancer in India. resulting from solid cook-fuels while 627,000 premature deaths and 17.8 million DALYs were attributable to ambient air pollution (AAP), in the form of fine particles (measured as PM 2.5) annually. Household and ambient air pollution account for 6% and 3% of the total national burden of disease (IHME 2013), respectively, and together exceed the burden from any of the other risk factors examined in the GBD-CRA in 2010. The total attributable disease burden estimates for AAP and HAP in India in 2010 are also
    Journal of the Indian Society of Agricultural Statistics. 09/2014; 68(3):391-405.
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate whether biomass burning causes oxidative DNA damage and alters the expression of DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins in airway cells, sputum samples were collected from 80 premenopausal rural biomass-users and 70 age-matched control women who cooked with liquefied petroleum gas. Compared with control the airway cells of biomass-users showed increased DNA damage in alkaline comet assay. Biomass-users showed higher percentage of cells expressing oxidative DNA damage marker 8-oxoguanine and lower percentages of BER proteins OGG1 and APE1 by Immunocytochemical staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was doubled and level of superoxide dismutase was depleted significantly among biomass-users. The concentrations of particulate matters were higher in biomass-using households which positively correlated with ROS generation and negatively with BER proteins expressions. ROS generation was positively correlated with 8-oxoguanine and negatively with BER proteins suggesting cooking with biomass is a risk for genotoxicity among rural women in their child-bearing age.
    Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology 09/2014; · 1.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The respiratory effects of chronic low-level arsenic exposure from groundwater have been investigated in West Bengal, India.
    International Journal of Public Health 05/2014; · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine whether chronic low level arsenic (As) exposure (11-50 μg/L) from drinking water elicits inflammation and oxidative stress. Methods: Never-smoking pre-menopausal women (n=267) from Nadia district, West Bengal, India, were enrolled into two groups (i) control (n=122, median age 39 yr) from villages with <10 μg/L of As in groundwater, and (ii) exposed (n=145, median age 38 yr) from the same district where the groundwater As was 11-50 μg/L. As in water was measured by atomic absorption spectrophtometry with vapour generation assembly. Sputum cytology and hematology were done by standard procedures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6, 8, 10, 12 (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma and cortisol in serum. Serum nitric oxide (NO) was measured colorimetrically, myleperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase by spectrophotometry, reactive oxygen species (ROS) by flow cytometry, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by immunocytochemistry. Results: As level in groundwater was higher in endemic areas (28.32 ± 13.51 vs. 2.72 ± 1.18, p<0.05), and exposed women had lower hemoglobin, leukocyte and erythrocyte levels but elevated platelet count than control and their sputum contained increased number of alveolar macrophages and inflammatory cells. In addition, they had elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-12, CRP, cortisol and NO but depleted level of IL-10 with excess generation of ROS and increased expression of iNOS in the airways. Neutrophils of As-exposed subjects had elevated levels of MPO and elastase. After controlling education and family income as potential confounders, the rise in pro-inflammatory mediators in blood and excess generation of ROS in the airways were positively associated with As levels in ground water. Conclusion: Drinking of water contaminated with low level of As for long causes pulmonary and systemic inflammation and generates excess ROS in the airways.
    Journal of Cancer Science and Therapy 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Biomass burning is a major source of indoor air pollution in rural India. This study examined whether chronic inhalation of biomass smoke causes change in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway in the airway cells. For this, airway cells exfoliated in sputum were collected from 72 premenopausal nonsmoking rural women (median age 34 years) who cooked with biomass (wood, dung, crop residues) and 68 control women who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for the past 5 years or more. The levels of particulate matters with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) in indoor air were measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Benzene exposure was monitored by measuring trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in airway cells were measured by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Immunocytochemical assay revealed lower percentage of airway epithelial cells expressing MMR proteins mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) in biomass-using women compared to LPG-using controls. Women who cooked with biomass had 6.7 times higher level of urinary t,t-MA, twofold increase in ROS generation, and 31 % depletion of SOD. Indoor air of biomass-using households had three times more particulate matters than that of controls. ROS, urinary t,t-MA, and particulate pollution in biomass-using kitchen had negative correlation, while SOD showed positive correlation with MSH2 and MLH1 expression. It appears that chronic exposure to biomass smoke reduces MMR response in airway epithelial cells, and oxidative stress plays an important role in the process.
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research 10/2013; · 2.76 Impact Factor
  • Anindita Dutta, Manas Ranjan Ray
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to examine how chronic biomass smoke exposure affects prevalence of different respiratory symptoms, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung function decrement; and how these changes in pulmonary health are related to pollutant levels inside the kitchen. We also investigated if these changes are associated with presence of hypertension. Two hundred and forty-four women using biomass fuel (median age 34 year) and 236 age-matched control women who cooked with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) were enrolled for this purpose. Questionnaire survey was used for respiratory symptom prevalence, spirometry for lung function assessment, and laser photometer for particulate matter <10 and 2.5 μm in diameter (PM10 and PM2.5, respectively) in cooking areas. Biomass users had higher prevalence of upper and lower (p < 0.05) respiratory symptoms, poorer lung function (64.3 vs. 26.3 % in control, p < 0.05), and higher prevalence of COPD (6.6 vs. 1.7 % in control, p < 0.05) and hypertension (29.5 vs. 11.0 % in control, p < 0.05). Significant positive association between exposure variables and respiratory symptoms, lung function measurements, COPD prevalence, and hypertension were noticed, after adjusting for potential confounders. The findings suggest involvement of biomass smoke in deterioration of health status of the biomass-using rural women.
    Air Quality Atmosphere & Health 06/2013; · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Changes in cells of the immune system are important indicators of systemic response of the body to air pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunological changes in rural women who have been cooking exclusively with biomass for the past 5years or more and compare the findings with women cooking exclusively with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the associations between indices of indoor air pollution (IAP) and a set of immune assays. Biomass users illustrated marked suppression in the total number of T-helper (CD4+) cells and B (CD19+) cells while appreciable rise was documented in the number of CD8+ T-cytotoxic cells and CD16+CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells. A consistent finding among biomass users was rise in regulatory T (Treg) cells. Among biomass users, peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations, Treg cells, and the number of typical monocytes (CD16-CD64+ cells), antigen presenting types (CD16+CD64- cells) and plasmacytoid cells (CD16-CD64- cells) were found to be significantly altered in those who daily cooked with dung in comparison to wood and crop residue users (p<0.05). Biomass users who cooked in kitchens adjacent to their living areas had significant changes in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations, typical monocytes (CD16-CD64+) with high phagocytic activity and antigen presenting monocytes (CD16+CD64-) against women who cooked in separate kitchens (p<0.01). This study has shown that women who cooked exclusively with biomass fuel had alterations in immune defense compared with their neighbors who cooked with LPG.
    Science of The Total Environment 09/2012; 438C:293-298. · 3.16 Impact Factor
  • Anindita Dutta, Manas Ranjan Ray
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    ABSTRACT: To find out the prevalence of hypertension, pre-hypertension and tachycardia among the women in rural areas of West Bengal, identify co-factors associated with the prevalence and contribute to the body of evidence for future health programs to identify at-risk groups. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted. The study was conducted in remote villages. 1186 women participants, aged 18 years or more were included. They were interviewed using standard structured questionnaire. Blood pressure and tachycardia was monitored using digital sphygmomanometer. For each participant, we made two blood pressure measurements with an interval of 48 hours. Data was analysed statistically using SPSS software. Overall prevalence of hypertension in the study subjects was 24.7% and that of pre-hypertension and tachycardia was 40.8% and 6.4%, respectively. Both hypertension and pre-hypertension were seen to increase with age. Other identified significant factors were use of biomass fuel for cooking, absence of separate kitchen, higher body mass index (BMI), education and average family income. This study suggests quite high prevalence of hypertension as well as pre-hypertension among the women of rural areas. The findings are significant from the women health perspectives. Early detection of pre-hypertensive and hypertensive subjects will help to formulate intervention strategies to allay the spread of cardiovascular diseases.
    Australian Journal of Rural Health 08/2012; 20(4):219-25. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To perform sputum analysis for verification of pulmonary changes in premenopausal rural Indian women chronically exposed to biomass smoke during cooking.Three consecutive morning sputum samples were collected from 196 women (median age 34 years) cooking with biomass and 149 age-matched control women cooking with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas. Smears made on slides were stained with Papanicolaou and Perl's Prussian blue. Airway oxidative stress was estimated as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (by flow cytometry) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) level (by spectrophotometry) in sputum cells. Airway inflammation was measured as sputum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, -8 and tumor necrosis factor- alpha (TNF-α). Particulate matter of diameter less than 10 (PM(10)) was measured using laser photometer while benzene exposure was monitored by measuring trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine by HPLC-UV. Compared with control, sputum of biomass users contained more neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils, alveolar macrophages, and showed presence of ciliocytophthoria, Charcot-Leyden crystals, Curschmann's spiral. ROS generation was increased by 2-fold while SOD was depleted by 31% in biomass users. They also had higher sputum levels of IL-6, -8 and TNF-α. Levels of PM(10) and t,t-MA were 2.9- and 5.8-times higher in biomass-using women. PM(10) and t,t-MA levels were positively associated with cellular changes in the sputum, markers of airway inflammation, and oxidative stress. Cooking with biomass alters sputum cytology, and increases airway inflammation and oxidative stress that might result in further amplification of the tissue damaging cascade in women chronically exposed to biomass smoke.
    International journal of hygiene and environmental health 07/2012; · 2.64 Impact Factor
  • Anindita Dutta, Manas Ranjan Ray
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    ABSTRACT: The study was undertaken to elucidate the inflammation- and oxidative stress-mediated deterioration of cardiovascular health in urban women exposed to ambient air pollution from vehicular and industrial emissions. A total of 556 urban women (median age, 34 years) and 514 age-matched control women who resided in the rural areas were enrolled. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as markers of inflammation. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by leukocytes was measured by flow cytometry and erythrocytic superoxide dismutase (SOD) was measured by spectrophotometry. Hypertension was diagnosed following the Seventh Report of the Joint Committee. On the days of sampling, data about particulate matter of diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) in city was obtained from website of State Pollution Control Board and that in rural ambience was measured using real-time aerosol monitor. Compared with control, urban women were exposed to higher levels of ambient air pollution; their serum contained significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and CRP. ROS generation was increased by 49 % while SOD was depleted by 34.9 %. Urban women were more hypertensive compared to their rural counterparts. PM10 levels were positively associated with inflammatory markers, oxidative stress, and hypertension. Exposure to increased levels of ambient air pollution, which are much higher than the set standard levels, predisposes urban women to increased risk of deteriorating cardiovascular health. Systemic inflammation and oxidative stress are assumed to be the key players in this process.
    Air Quality Atmosphere & Health 06/2012; 6(2). · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cooking with biomass fuel, a common practice in rural India, is associated with a high level of indoor air pollution (IAP). The aim of this study was to investigate whether IAP from biomass burning increases the risk of depression. For this cross-sectional study, we enrolled a group of 952 women (median age 37 years) who cooked regularly with biomass and a control group of 804 age-matched women who cooked with cleaner fuel (liquefied petroleum gas). Depression was assessed using the second edition of Beck's depression inventory (BDI-II). Platelet P-selectin expression was assessed by flow cytometry and platelet serotonin was measured by ELISA. Particulate matter having diameter of less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM(10) and PM(2.5), respectively) in indoor air was measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Carbon monoxide (CO) in exhaled breath was measured by CO monitor. Compared with the control group, women who cooked with biomass had a higher prevalence of depression and depleted platelet serotonin, suggesting altered serotonergic activity in the brain. In addition, P-selectin expression on platelet surface was up-regulated implying platelet hyperactivity and consequent risk of cardiovascular disease. Biomass-using households had increased levels of PM(10) and PM(2.5), and biomass users had elevated levels of CO in expired air. Controlling potential confounders, cooking with biomass was found to be an independent and strong risk factor for depression. IAP from cooking with biomass is a risk for depression among rural women in their child-bearing age.
    Social Science [?] Medicine 04/2012; 75(3):565-72. · 2.56 Impact Factor
  • Anindita Dutta, Manas Ranjan Ray, Anirban Banerjee
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    ABSTRACT: The study was undertaken to investigate whether regular cooking with biomass aggravates systemic inflammation and oxidative stress that might result in increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rural Indian women compared to cooking with a cleaner fuel like liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). A total of 635 women (median age 36 years) who cooked with biomass and 452 age-matched control women who cooked with LPG were enrolled. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured by ELISA. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by leukocytes was measured by flow cytometry, and erythrocytic superoxide dismutase (SOD) was measured by spectrophotometry. Hypertension was diagnosed following the Seventh Report of the Joint Committee. Tachycardia was determined as pulse rate >100 beats per minute. Particulate matter of diameter less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅, respectively) in cooking areas was measured using real-time aerosol monitor. Compared with control, biomass users had more particulate pollution in indoor air, their serum contained significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and CRP, and ROS generation was increased by 37% while SOD was depleted by 41.5%, greater prevalence of hypertension and tachycardia compared to their LPG-using neighbors. PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ levels were positively associated with markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and hypertension. Inflammatory markers correlated with raised blood pressure. Cooking with biomass exacerbates systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, hypertension and tachycardia in poor women cooking with biomass fuel and hence, predisposes them to increased risk of CVD development compared to the controls. Systemic inflammation and oxidative stress may be the mechanistic factors involved in the development of CVD.
    Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 04/2012; 261(3):255-62. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cooking with biomass fuel, a common practice in rural India, is associated with a high level of indoor air pollution (IAP). The aim of this study was to investigate whether IAP from biomass burning increases the risk of depression. For this cross-sectional study, we enrolled a group of 952 women (median age 37 years) who cooked regularly with biomass and a control group of 804 age-matched women who cooked with cleaner fuel (liquefied petroleum gas). Depression was assessed using the second edition of Beck’s depression inventory (BDI-II). Platelet P-selectin expression was assessed by flow cytometry and platelet serotonin was measured by ELISA. Particulate matter having diameter of less than 10 and 2.5 mm (PM10 and PM2.5, respectively) in indoor air was measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Carbon monoxide (CO) in exhaled breath was measured by CO monitor. Compared with the control group, women who cooked with biomass had a higher prevalence of depression and depleted platelet serotonin, suggesting altered serotonergic activity in the brain. In addition, P-selectin expression on platelet surface was up-regulated implying platelet hyperactivity and consequent risk of cardiovascular disease. Biomass-using households had increased levels of PM10 and PM2.5, and biomass users had elevated levels of CO in expired air. Controlling potential confounders, cooking with biomass was found to be an independent and strong risk factor for depression. IAP from cooking with biomass is a risk for depression among rural women in their child-bearing age.
    Social Science [?] Medicine 01/2012; · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass fuel burning on the risk of carcinogenesis in the airways has been investigated in 187 pre-menopausal women (median age 34years) from eastern India who cooked exclusively with biomass and 155 age-matched control women from same locality who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas. Compared with control, Papanicolau-stained sputum samples showed 3-times higher prevalence of metaplasia and 7-times higher prevalence of dysplasia in airway epithelial cell (AEC) of biomass users. Immunocytochemistry showed up-regulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt(ser473) and p-Akt(thr308)) proteins in AEC of biomass users, especially in metaplastic and dysplastic cells. Compared with LPG users, biomass-using women showed marked rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) indicating oxidative stress. There were 2-5 times more particulate pollutants (PM(10) and PM(2.5)), 72% more nitrogen dioxide and 4-times more particulate-laden benzo(a)pyrene, but no change in sulfur dioxide in indoor air of biomass-using households, and high performance liquid chromatography estimated 6-fold rise in the concentration of benzene metabolite trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine of biomass users. Metaplasia and dysplasia, p-Akt expression and ROS generation were positively associated with PM and t,t-MA levels. It appears that cumulative exposure to biomass smoke increases the risk of lung carcinogenesis via oxidative stress-mediated activation of Akt signal transduction pathway.
    Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 12/2011; 259(1):45-53. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined whether indoor air pollution from biomass fuel burning induces DNA damage in airway cells. For this, sputum cells were collected from 56 premenopausal rural women who cooked with biomass (wood, dung, crop residues) and 49 age-matched controls who cooked with cleaner liquefied petroleum gas. The levels of particulate matters with diameters of less than 10 and 2.5 µm (PM(10) and PM(2.5) ) in indoor air were measured using a real-time aerosol monitor. Benzene exposure was monitored by measuring trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine by HPLC-UV. DNA damage was examined by alkaline comet assay in sputum cells. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in sputum cells were measured by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Compared with controls, biomass users had 4 times higher tail percentage DNA, 37% more comet tail length and 5 times more Olive tail moment (p < 0.001) in inflammatory and epithelial cells in sputum, suggesting extensive DNA damage. In addition, women who cooked with biomass had 6 times higher levels of urinary t,t-MA and 2-fold higher levels of ROS generation concomitant with 28% depletion of SOD. Indoor air of biomass-using households had 2-4 times more PM(10) and PM(2.5) than that of controls(.) After controlling potential confounders, positive association was found between DNA damage parameters, particulate pollution, urinary t,t-MA and ROS. Thus, long-term exposure to biomass smoke induces DNA damage in airway cells and the effect was probably mediated, at least in part, by oxidative stress generated by inhaled particulate matter and benzene. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Journal of Applied Toxicology 12/2011; · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    Nandan Kumar Mondal, Sreenita Ghosh, Manas Ranjan Ray
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of glue snuffle on the expression of argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs), an indicator of ribosome biosynthesis, in epithelial cells of oral mucosa has been investigated. AgNOR was evaluated by cytochemical staining in 148 Indian street boys (median age 12 year) who had different bad addictions like tobacco smoking, chewing and most importantly inhaling glue and 20 age- and body mass index-matched school boys who had no such type of bad habit. Compared with school boys, glue addicted street boys showed remarkably increased number of AgNOR dots per nucleus (9.38±1.84 vs. 3.12±0.87, p<0.001), AgNOR size (1.34±0.52 vs. 0.43±0.02 μm(2), p<0.001) and percentage of AgNOR occupied nuclear area (9.38±2.12 vs. 0.99±0.03%, p<0.001). Increase in number and size of the dots is also higher in tobacco smokers and chewers when compared with school boys but a remarkable difference was recorded in glue addicted boys. The changes in AgNOR expression were positively associated with years of addiction after controlling potential confounders. Thus, glue snuffle appeared to be a risk factor for abnormal cell growth via up-regulation of ribosome biogenesis.
    Experimental and Toxicologic Pathology 11/2011; 63(7-8):677-81. · 2.01 Impact Factor
  • Nandan Kumar Mondal, Manas Ranjan Ray
    International Toxicology of Mixtures Conference, Arlington, VA, USA; 10/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to poor air quality is associated with a multitude of hematological and immunological alterations. Cardio vascular diseases, rather than respiratory ailments, are the most important cause of death from air pollution exposure. Thus, hematological, immunological and cardiovascular alterations in healthy individuals exposed to vehicular pollution (one of the leading source of air pollution in growing metropolitan cities) are investigated in this study. A total number of 2218 (21-65 years old) adults residing in Delhi participated in this study. As control, 642 age and sex matched healthy subjects from the rural areas of Uttaranchal were enrolled. Arterial blood pressure (BP) was measured by a sphygmomanometer. Blood samples were collected and routine hematology was done. Lymphocyte subset analysis and platelet P-selectin expression was measured by flow cytometry. Air quality data was collected from Central and State Pollution Control Boards and was also measured onsite by portable, battery-operated laser photometer. The prevalence of hypertension was nearly 4-times higher in Delhi when compared to the control. Platelet P-selectin was remarkably upregulated in residents of Delhi. They had depleted number of CD4+ T-helper cells and CD19+ B cells but elevated level of CD56+ natural killer cells. Altered lymphocyte subtypes and increased number of P-selectin-positive platelets suggest altered immunity (that may compromise body's defense against infections) and hypercoagulable state, a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The current study has identified poor air quality of Delhi as a key contributor to several adverse health conditions experienced by the general population of the city, which not only makes the quality of life compromised but also put them at a greater risk of developing cardiovascular ailments later in life.
    International journal of hygiene and environmental health 09/2011; 215(3):306-11. · 2.64 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

278 Citations
88.95 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2014
    • Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute
      Kolkata, Bengal, India
    • University of Calcutta
      • Department of Zoology
      Calcutta, Bengal, India
  • 2011
    • Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati
      Gauhāti, Assam, India