Mariëlle J L Romberg-Camps

Orbis Medisch Centrum, Sittard, Limburg, Netherlands

Are you Mariëlle J L Romberg-Camps?

Claim your profile

Publications (24)94.59 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and direct health care costs. A large cohort of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) was prospectively followed for 2 years by 3 monthly web-based questionnaires. At 2 years, patients completed the IBD disability index, with lower score indicating more disability. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the impact of demographics, clinical characteristics, and illness perceptions on self-reported disability. Trends in direct health care costs across the disability severity groups minimal, mild, moderate, and severe, were tested. A total of 554 patients with CD and 424 patients with UC completed the IBD disability index (response rate, 45%). Both clinical characteristics and illness perceptions significantly contributed to self-reported disability (45%-47%, P = 0.000 and 8%-12%, P = 0.000, respectively). Patients with CD scored lower on the self-reported IBD disability index than patients with UC (0.255 versus 3.890, P < 0.000), indicating more disability in patients with CD. Factors independently associated with higher self-reported disability rates were increased disease activity, illness identity (higher number of symptoms attributed to IBD), and stronger emotional response. Disease duration and disease phenotype were not associated with self-reported disability. Direct health care costs increased with the worsening of self-reported disability (P = 0.000). More disability was reported by patients with CD than by UC. Self-reported disability in IBD was mainly determined by clinical disease activity and illness perceptions but not by disease duration or disease phenotype.
    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 01/2015; DOI:10.1097/MIB.0000000000000278 · 5.48 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Population aging is expected to result in a substantial additional burden on healthcare resources in the near future. We aimed to assess the current and future impact of aging on direct healthcare costs (DHC) attributed to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD from a Dutch multicenter cohort filled out 3-monthly questionnaires for 2 years. Elderly (≥60 yr) and younger patients (18-60 yr) IBD were analyzed for differences in 3-monthly DHC, productivity losses, and out-of-pocket costs. Prevalence rates were obtained from a health insurance database. Estimates of annual DHC and prevalence rates were applied to the total Dutch adult population in 2011 and then projected to 2040, using predicted changes in population demography, prices, and volume. IBD-attributable DHC were lower in elderly than in younger patients with IBD with respect to 3-monthly DHC (&OV0556;359 versus &OV0556;978, P < 0.01), productivity losses (&OV0556;108 versus &OV0556;456, P < 0.01), and out-of-pocket costs (&OV0556;40 versus &OV0556;57, P < 0.01). Between 2011 and 2040, the percentage of elderly IBD patients in the Netherlands has been projected to rise from 24% to 35%. Between 2011 and 2040, DHC of the total IBD population in the Netherlands are projected to increase from &OV0556;161 to &OV0556;661 million. Population aging accounted for 1% of this increase, next to rising prices (29%), and volume growth (70%). Population aging has a negligible effect on IBD-attributable DHC of the IBD population in the near future, because the average costs incurred by elderly patients with IBD are considerably lower than those incurred by younger patients with IBD.
    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 02/2014; 20(4). DOI:10.1097/01.MIB.0000442677.55051.03 · 5.48 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 02/2014; 8:S58. DOI:10.1016/S1873-9946(14)60115-X · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 02/2014; 8:S3–S4. DOI:10.1016/S1873-9946(14)60006-4 · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • Endoscopy 05/2013; 45(5):407. DOI:10.1055/s-0032-1326396 · 5.20 Impact Factor
  • Endoscopy 05/2013; 45(5):409. DOI:10.1055/s-0032-1326424 · 5.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine to what extent the Rome III criteria for irritable bowel syndrome can contribute towards safely reducing unnecessary referrals for colonoscopy in primary care patients with lower gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. DESIGN: Data from the CEDAR study were used: a cross-sectional study in 810 patients with lower GI complaints suggestive for organic bowel disease who were referred by their general practitioner for secondary care colonoscopy. Fulfilment of the Rome III criteria was ascertained by a questionnaire. General practitioners recorded the presence or absence of alarm symptoms. Outcome was determined by colonoscopy and histology. RESULTS: Of 810 participants, 222 fulfilled the Rome III criteria [27%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 24-31%]. The majority of these patients presented with alarm symptoms. Only 39 participants fulfilled the Rome III criteria and lacked alarm symptoms (overall frequency 5%, 95% CI 4-7). Overall, organic bowel disease was diagnosed in 141 participants (17%). Participants who fulfilled the Rome III criteria had a significantly lower risk of organic bowel disease compared with participants who did not [12% (95% CI 8-17) vs. 20% (95% CI 17-23), P<0.01]. The lowest risk was observed in patients without alarm symptoms who fulfilled the Rome III criteria (3%, 95% CI 0-14). CONCLUSION: A minority of referred primary care patients with lower GI complaints both fulfilled the Rome III criteria for irritable bowel syndrome and lacked alarm symptoms. Although organic bowel disease could be ruled out safely in this small group, application of the Rome III criteria is not likely to lead to a considerable reduction in unnecessary referrals for colonoscopy in these patients.
    European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology 01/2013; DOI:10.1097/MEG.0b013e32835d4ddd · 2.15 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with high costs to society. Few data on the impact of IBD on work disability and potential predictive factors are available. Aim To assess the prevalence of and predictive factors for work disability in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods A web-based questionnaire was sent out in seven university hospitals and seven general hospitals in the Netherlands. Initially, 3050 adult IBD patients were included in this prospective, nationwide cohort study, whereof 2629 patients were within the working-age (18–64 years). We used the baseline questionnaire to assess the prevalence rates of work disability in CD and UC patients within working-age. Prevalence rates were compared with the Dutch background population using age- and sex-matched data obtained from Statistics Netherlands. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify independent demographic- and disease-specific risk factors for work disability. Results In CD, 18.3% of patients was fully disabled and 8.8% partially disabled, compared to 9.5% and 5.4% in UC patients (p < 0.01), respectively. Compared to Dutch controls, the prevalence was significantly higher, especially in CD patients. Higher age, low education, depression, chronic back pain, joint manifestations and typical disease-related risk factors such as penetrating disease course and surgery in the past were all found to be associated with work disability. Conclusion We report high work disability rates in a large sample of IBD patients in the Netherlands. CD patients suffer more frequently from work disability than UC patients. A combination of demographic and disease-related factors is predictive of work disability.
    Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 01/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.crohns.2013.11.019 · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The introduction of anti tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNFα) therapy might impact healthcare expenditures, but there are limited data regarding the costs of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) following the introduction of these drugs. We aimed to assess the healthcare costs and productivity losses in a large cohort of IBD patients. DESIGN: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients from seven university hospitals and seven general hospitals were invited to fill-out a web-based questionnaire. Cost items were derived from a 3 month follow-up questionnaire and categorised in outpatient clinic, diagnostics, medication, surgery and hospitalisation. Productivity losses included sick leave of paid and unpaid work. Costs were expressed as mean 3-month costs per patients with a 95% CI obtained using non-parametric bootstrapping. RESULTS: A total of 1315 CD patients and 937 UC patients were included. Healthcare costs were almost three times higher in CD as compared with UC, €1625 (95% CI €1476 to €1775) versus €595 (95% CI €505 to €685), respectively (p<0.01). Anti-TNFα use was the main costs driver, accounting for 64% and 31% of the total cost in CD and UC. Hospitalisation and surgery together accounted for 19% and <1% of the healthcare costs in CD and 23% and 1% in UC, respectively. Productivity losses accounted for 16% and 39% of the total costs in CD and UC. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that healthcare costs are mainly driven by medication costs, most importantly by anti-TNFα therapy. Hospitalisation and surgery accounted only for a minor part of the healthcare costs.
    Gut 11/2012; DOI:10.1136/gutjnl-2012-303376 · 13.32 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background and study aims: Colonoscopy is increasingly performed by nurse endoscopists. We aimed to assess the endoscopic quality and patient experience of these procedures. Patients and methods: This prospective multicenter study analyzed 100 consecutive colonoscopies each for 10 trained nurse endoscopists with respect to endoscopic quality and patient experience. Colonoscopies were performed under the supervision of a gastroenterologist, using the techniques and protocols of the participating hospitals. Patient experience was assessed using a questionnaire. Results: Most nurse endoscopists were female (90 %; median age 43 [range 35 - 49]). Before the start of the study, they had performed a median of 528 colonoscopies (range 208 - 2103). For the 1000 patients, mean age was 56 ± 15 years; 55 % were women; and 96 % were in class I or II according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists' physical status classification system. Colonoscopies were performed for screening or surveillance in 42 %; for symptomatic indications in 58 % of patients. The unassisted cecal intubation rate was 94 %; the mean withdrawal time was 10 ± 5 minutes. The adenoma detection rate was 26.7 %. In 229 of the colonoscopies (23 %), the nurse endoscopists required assistance from the supervising gastroenterologist. The complication rate was 0.2 %: one perforation and one cardiopulmonary complication. The questionnaire was completed by 734 /1000 patients (73 %) and of these 694 /734 (95 %) were satisfied with the endoscopic procedure. Among the respondents 530 /734 (72 %) had no specific preference for a physician or nurse endoscopist, whereas 113 /734 (15 %) preferred a physician endoscopist, and 91 /734 (12 %) preferred a nurse endoscopist. Conclusion: The nurse endoscopists performed colonoscopies according to the internationally recognized quality standards and with high patient satisfaction.
    Endoscopy 08/2012; 44(12). DOI:10.1055/s-0032-1310154 · 5.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Fatigue is one of the most common and troubling symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), and heat is often reported as a trigger. Although it is assumed that this heat sensitivity is specific for MS, the evidence for disease specificity is limited. We studied the relationship between fatigue, heat sensitivity, and environmental temperature, and its specificity for MS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We compared 88 MS patients with 76 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), another chronic auto-immune disease. As most important outcome measures, heat sensitivity, physical fatigue, mental fatigue, environmental temperature, and ambient UV-light levels were determined. RESULTS: More patients with MS reported heat sensitivity for fatigue, compared to patients with UC (53.4% vs 35.5%, respectively, P = 0.016). However, heat-sensitive patients were equally fatigued as heat-insensitive patients. Climatological data, including day temperature and amount of ambient UV light, were not related to fatigue in both heat-sensitive and heat-insensitive patients with MS. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the assumption that heat sensitivity regarding fatigue has an MS-specific component. Although patients with MS experience a relationship between environmental temperature and fatigue, objective assessment by climatological data could not confirm this.
    Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 03/2012; DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0404.2012.01660.x · 2.44 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 02/2012; 6:S5. DOI:10.1016/S1873-9946(12)60010-5 · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 02/2012; 6:S87. DOI:10.1016/S1873-9946(12)60214-1 · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Therapeutic drug monitoring of active metabolites of thiopurines, azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine, is relatively new. The proposed therapeutic threshold level of the active 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) is ≥235 pmol/8×10(8) erythrocytes. The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to compare 6-TGN levels in adult thiopurine tolerant IBD patients with an exacerbation with those in remission, and to determine the therapeutic 6-TGN cut-off level. Hundred IBD patients were included. Outcome measures were thiopurine metabolite levels, calculated therapeutic 6-TGN cut-off level, CDAI/CAI scores, thiopurine dose and TPMT enzyme activity. Forty-one patients had an exacerbation, 59 patients were in remission. In 17% of all patients 6-TGN levels were compatible with non-compliance. The median 6-TGN levels were not significantly different between the exacerbation and remission group (227 versus 263 pmol/8×10(8) erythrocytes, p=0.29). The previous reported therapeutic 6-TGN cut-off level of 235 pmol/8×10(8) erythrocytes was confirmed in this study. Twenty-six of the 41 patients (63%) with active disease had 6-TGN levels below this threshold and 24 of 59 IBD patients (41%) in clinical remission (p=0.04). Thiopurine non-compliance occurs frequently both in active and quiescent disease. 6-TGN levels below or above the therapeutic threshold are associated with a significant higher chance of IBD exacerbation and remission, respectively. These data support the role of therapeutic drug monitoring in thiopurine maintenance therapy in IBD to reveal non-compliance or underdosing, and can be used as a practical tool to optimize thiopurine therapy, especially in case of thiopurine non-response.
    Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 01/2012; 6(6):698-707. DOI:10.1016/j.crohns.2011.12.003 · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The importance of fatigue in chronic disease has been increasingly recognized; however, little is known about fatigue in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of fatigue and the impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients included in a population-based IBD cohort in the Netherlands. IBD patients, diagnosed between January 1st, 1991, and January 1st, 2003, were followed up for a median of 7.1 years. They completed a questionnaire, which included a disease activity score, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20), the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ), and the Short Form health survey (SF-36). Hemoglobin levels were recorded. Data were available in 304 Crohn's disease (CD), 368 ulcerative colitis (UC), and 35 indeterminate colitis (IC) patients. During quiescent disease, the prevalence of fatigue was nearly 40%. MFI-20 and HRQoL scores were significantly worse in IBD patients having active disease. In a multivariate analysis, disease activity was positively related with the level of fatigue in both CD and UC. In UC, anemia influenced the general fatigue score independently of disease activity. Disease activity as well as fatigue were independently associated with an impaired IBDQ. In IBD, even in remission, fatigue is an important feature. Both in CD and in UC, fatigue determined HRQoL independently of disease activity or anemia. This implies that in IBD patients physicians need to be aware of fatigue in order to better understand its impact and to improve the HRQoL.
    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 12/2010; 16(12):2137-47. DOI:10.1002/ibd.21285 · 5.48 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fatigue is one of the most common and troubling symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and more severe and disabling than fatigue in other somatic populations. Although fatigue seems MS specific, its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. To study the disease specificity of fatigue in MS by comparing its level, its physical and psychological correlates to those of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), a peripheral chronic auto-immune disease. We focused on the relative contribution of disease severity, depression and negative affectivity to fatigue in both patient samples. A total of 88 MS and 76 UC patients were included in this cross-sectional study. Fatigue, depression and negative affectivity were assessed respectively with the physical and mental fatigue subscales of the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the neuroticism subscale of the Dutch NEO Five-Factor Inventory. The Expanded Disability Status Scale and the Colitis Activity Index were used to measure disease severity in MS and UC patients respectively. While levels of both physical and mental fatigue were significantly higher in MS patients than in UC patients, there were no group differences in the contribution of disease severity, depression and negative affectivity to both physical and mental fatigue. Although levels of fatigue are higher for MS patients when compared with UC patients, the correlates of fatigue do not indicate MS specificity. As such our results support a transdiagnostic approach to fatigue in MS.
    Journal of psychosomatic research 07/2010; 69(1):43-9. DOI:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2009.11.011 · 2.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim was to evaluate overall and disease-specific mortality in a population-based inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cohort in the Netherlands, as well as risk factors for mortality. IBD patients diagnosed between 1 January 1991 and 1 January 2003 were included. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated overall and with regard to causes of death, gender, as well as age, phenotype, smoking status at diagnosis, and medication use. At the censoring date, 72 out of 1187 patients had died (21 Crohn's disease [CD], 47 ulcerative colitis [UC], and 4 indeterminate colitis [IC] patients). The SMR (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 1.1 (0.7-1.6) for CD, 0.9 (0.7-1.2) for UC and 0.7 (0.2-1.7) for IC. Disease-specific mortality risk was significantly increased for gastrointestinal (GI) causes of death both in CD (SMR 7.5, 95% CI: 2.8-16.4) and UC (SMR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.4-7.0); in CD patients, especially in patients <40 years of age at diagnosis. For UC, an increased SMR was noted in female patients and in patients <19 years and >80 years at diagnosis. In contrast, UC patients had a decreased mortality risk from cancer (SMR 0.5, 95% CI; 0.2-0.9). In this population-based IBD study, mortality in CD, UC, and IC was comparable to the background population. The increased mortality risk for GI causes might reflect complicated disease course, with young and elderly patients at diagnosis needing intensive follow-up. Caution in interpreting the finding on mortality risk from cancer is needed as follow-up was probably to short to observe IBD-related cancers.
    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 12/2009; 16(8):1397-410. DOI:10.1002/ibd.21189 · 5.48 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Increasing incidence in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) has been suggested. Recent data on population based incidence rates within Europe are however scarce. Primary aim was to investigate prospectively the incidence of IBD within a well-defined geographical and administrative area of the Netherlands, the South Limburg IBD registry. Secondary aims were to study the duration of symptoms before diagnosis (lag time) and seasonal influences on the incidence of IBD. The incidence was examined using standardized registration of all newly diagnosed IBD patients, between 1-1-1991 and 1-1-2003. Medical records were reviewed to verify the diagnosis. At inclusion, diagnostic lag time was registered in months. Age standardized incidence rates per 100,000 person-years (p-y) were: Crohn's Disease, male 4.84, female 7.58; Ulcerative Colitis, male 8.51, female 6.92; and Indeterminate Colitis, male 1.05, female 0.93. Incidence rates did not significantly changes over time in either Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis or Indeterminate Colitis. Lag time was 5 (0-360) months in Crohn's Disease, 3.0 (0-480) months in Ulcerative Colitis and 3.0 (0-180) months in Indeterminate Colitis. Lag time was not significantly different between the periods 1991-1993 and 2000-2002, and no statistical differences in the onset of symptoms per calendar month or season were found. Our results, from the South Limburg region (the Netherlands), show no significant change in incidence rates of IBD. The incidence found is relatively high compared to other European countries. Lag time did not change during the study period, and seasonal influence of incidence rates could not be confirmed.
    Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 06/2009; 3(2):115-24. DOI:10.1016/j.crohns.2008.12.002 · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Disease course in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is variable and difficult to predict. To optimize prognosis, it is of interest to identify phenotypic characteristics at disease onset and other prognostic factors that predict disease course. The aim of this study was to evaluate such factors in a population-based IBD group. IBD patients diagnosed between 1 January 1991 and 1 January 2003 were included. A follow-up questionnaire was developed and medical records were reviewed. Patients were classified according to phenotype at diagnosis and risk factors were registered. Disease severity, cumulative medication use, and "surgical" and "nonsurgical" recurrence rates were calculated as outcome parameters. In total, 476 Crohn's disease (CD), 630 ulcerative colitis (UC), and 81 indeterminate colitis (IC) patients were diagnosed. In CD (mean follow-up 7.6 years), 50% had undergone resective surgery. In UC (mean follow-up 7 years), colectomy rate was 8.3%. First year cumulative recurrence rates per 100 patient-years for CD, UC, and IC were 53, 44, and 42%, respectively. In CD, small bowel localization and stricturing disease were negative prognostic factors for surgery, as was young age. Overall recurrence rate was increased by young age and current smoking. In UC, extensive colitis increased surgical risk. In UC, older age at diagnosis initially increased recurrence risk but was subsequently protective. This population-based IBD study showed high recurrence rates in the first year. In CD, small bowel localization, stricturing disease, and young age were predictive for disease recurrence. In UC, extensive colitis and older age at diagnosis were negative prognostic predictors.
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology 02/2009; 104(2):371-83. DOI:10.1038/ajg.2008.38 · 9.21 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Infliximab is an accepted induction and maintenance treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. The effectiveness of infliximab has been demonstrated for both active luminal disease and for enterocutaneous fistulisation. In addition, infliximab can be administered for extraintestinal symptoms of Crohn's disease, such as pyoderma gangrenosum, uveitis and arthropathy. Maintenance treatment with infliximab is effective and is regarded as safe as long as the necessary safety measures are heeded. Infusion reactions occur in 3 to 17% of the patients and are associated with the formation of antibodies to infliximab. A reduction in infusion reactions is possible by the concurrent administration of steroids and the use of immunosuppressants (azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate). Furthermore, immunosuppressants increase the duration of the response to infliximab. For these reasons, the concomitant use of immunosuppressants with infliximab is recommended. Infections and most specifically tuberculosis need to be ruled out before infliximab is administered. Up to now, there are no indications for a connection between an increased risk for malignancies and treatment with infliximab.
    The Netherlands Journal of Medicine 01/2006; 64(7):219-29. · 2.21 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

275 Citations
94.59 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2013
    • Orbis Medisch Centrum
      Sittard, Limburg, Netherlands
    • University Medical Center Utrecht
      • Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 2009–2010
    • Maastricht Universitair Medisch Centrum
      • Central Diagnostic Laboratory
      Maestricht, Limburg, Netherlands
    • Maastricht University
      Maestricht, Limburg, Netherlands