M Hein

Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Central Jutland, Denmark

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Publications (5)17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of cerclage, with and without cervical occlusion. DESIGN: Multicentre, stratified, randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Hospital-based multicentre study with 18 tertiary centres from nine countries. POPULATION: Women with a history of cervical insufficiency (prophylactic trial) and women with a short cervix (therapeutic trial) were recruited from August 2006 to August 2011. METHODS: A centralised telephone randomisation service with a computer system was used to randomise women to cervical cerclage with or without cervical occlusion. Only the analyst performing the interim analyses was blinded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The take-home baby rate (number of infants discharged alive from the hospital), gestational age at delivery, and the number of days in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). RESULTS: Women (n = 309) were stratified into the prophylactic trial (n = 213) or the therapeutic trial (n = 96). The trial stopped early due to slow recruitment and an interim analysis showing no benefit of occlusion. Final analysis comprised 197 women in the prophylactic trial and 87 women in the therapeutic trial. No added effect of cervical occlusion was found in terms of the take-home baby rate in the prophylactic trial (92 versus 90%, RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.94-1.12) or in the therapeutic trial (81 versus 85%, RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.79-1.16). No effect of cervical occlusion was found in terms of gestational age at delivery and number of days the neonate spent in the NICU. Cervical occlusion was associated with no harm. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical occlusion with cerclage had no significant additional effect.
    BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 01/2013; · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of double cerclage compared with a single cerclage. DESIGN: Randomised, controlled multicentre trial. SETTING: Ten different countries are participating with both secondary and tertiary centres. The countries participating are Denmark, Sweden, Germany, United Kingdom, Spain, South Africa, Australia and India. This gives both a broad spectrum of diversity global and local. We expect a total of 242 women enrolled per year. POPULATION: Prophylactic study: 1. History of cervical incompetence/insufficiency. (Delivery 15 to <36 weeks.) 2. Congenital short cervix (secondary to maternal administration of diethyl stilbestrol) or traumatic/surgical damage rendering the vaginal approach difficult (e.g. conisation). 3. Cervical suture applied in previous pregnancy, successful outcome. 4. Previous failed cerclage. Therapeutic study: 5. Secondary cerclage: Short cervix, without the membranes being exposed to the vagina. 6. Tertiary cerclage: Short cervix, membranes exposed to the vagina. Observational study: Eligible women who refuse to be randomised will participate in an observational study. 7. Repeat/requested cervical occlusion. METHODS: The women will be randomised between a single (vaginal or abdominal) and a double cerclage. The cervical cerclage (McDonald or Shirodkar) as well as the abdominal suture will be performed with the same material and technique normally used by the participating department. Those randomised to the double cerclage will have their external os closed with a continuous nylon 2-0/3-0 suture, in addition to the standard single cerclage. Local guidelines concerning antibiotics, Heparin, bed rest, tocolytics etc. are followed and recorded in the follow-up form. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary endpoint is take home baby rate. The secondary endpoints are gestational age at delivery, incidence of preterm birth (<34+0 days) and number of days in neonatal unit.
    BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 06/2007; 114(5):649, e1-6. · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cervical weakness and infection have long been regarded as major causes of preterm birth. Cervical cerclage has been used extensively to reduce the risk of preterm birth arising as a result of cervical weakness, but increasing evidence suggests that the cervix plays more than just a mechanical role. Immunological function of the cervix and mucus plug is thought to be important in minimising the ingress of microbes, which can lead to chorioamnionitis and rupture of the amniotic membranes. In this review, we examine the background of traditional cervical cerclage and introduce the concept of the occlusion suture and its potential benefit in reducing the risk of recurrent preterm prelabour rupture of membranes.
    BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 06/2007; 114(5):532-6. · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether cervical mucus plugs are antibacterial in vitro. Cervical mucus plugs from 56 healthy women in labor were studied by 2 different antimicrobial assays: (1) analysis of the inhibition by the cervical mucus plug of several gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by overlaying the cervical mucus plug onto an agar plate with imbedded bacteria, and (2) determination of the antibacterial property of the cervical mucus plug material by radial diffusion assay with group B Streptococcus and Escherichia coli. In the agar overlay assay, there was complete inhibition of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, E coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and patient-variable partial-to-complete inhibition of Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae. In the radial diffusion assay, cervical mucus plugs had activity toward group B Streptococcus equivalent to 0.075 microg/mL of gentamicin and toward E coli equivalent to 0.5 microg/mL of gentamicin. A low-molecular substance with antibacterial activity in the cervical mucus plug may protect the fetus against ascending infections.
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 10/2001; 185(3):586-92. · 3.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present study was to explore the direct effects of amnion and chorion on bacterial growth in vitro including the antibacterial spectrum. Chorioamniotic membranes were obtained under sterile conditions from 13 healthy women undergoing elective cesarean section at term. Likewise, chorioamniotic membranes were obtained from 10 healthy women with spontaneous vaginal delivery at term. Five strains of Hemolytic streptococci group B (GBS) were tested and one clinical isolate of the following species or bacterial groups: Hemolytic streptococcus group A, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Lactobacillus species. Bacteriological media included (1) blood-agar medium; (2) a transparent agar medium for submerged cultures; and (3) a nutrient broth medium. An inhibitory effect of fetal membranes against a range of bacteria was found. Consistent results were obtained in experiments with cultures on agar and cultures suspended in agar (membranes from eight women in both studies). In experiments with liquid cultures (seven women) only chorion showed a marginal inhibitory effect. All strains were inhibited, but the most pronounced inhibition was obtained for streptococcus group A, S. aureus and S. saprophyticus by both chorion and amnion. This study demonstrated an inhibitory effect of the fetal membranes on a diverse panel of bacteria
    European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology 03/2001; 94(2):224-9. · 1.84 Impact Factor