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Publications (2)10.56 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The role of nonrespiratory peripheral afferents in dyspnea perception has not been fully elucidated yet. Our hypothesis is that fatigue-induced activation of limb muscle metaboreceptors served by group IV fine afferent fibers may impact on respiratory effort perception. We studied 12 healthy subjects breathing against progressive inspiratory resistive loads (10, 18, 30, 40, and 90 cmH(2)O x l(-1) x s) before and after inducing low-frequency fatigue of quadriceps muscle by repeating sustained contractions at > or = 80% of maximal voluntary contraction. Subjects also underwent a sham protocol while performing two loaded breathing runs without muscle fatigue in between. During the loaded breathing, while subjects mimicked the quiet breathing pattern using a visual feedback, ventilation, tidal volume, respiratory frequency, pleural pressure swings, arterial oxygen saturation, end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2), and dyspnea by a Borg scale were recorded. Compared with prefatigue, limb muscle fatigue resulted in a higher increase in respiratory effort perception for any given ventilation, tidal volume, respiratory frequency, pleural pressure swings, end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2), and arterial oxygen saturation. No difference between the two runs was observed with the sham protocol. The present data support the hypothesis that fatigue of limb muscles increases respiratory effort perception associated with loaded breathing, likely by the activation of limb muscle metaboreceptors.
    Journal of Applied Physiology 08/2010; 109(2):367-76. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study hypothesises that regardless of the global score of dyspnoea intensity, different descriptors may be selected by asthmatic patients during short cardiopulmonary exercise test (sCPET) and methacholine (Mch) inhalation. It also examines whether different qualitative dyspnoea sensations can help explain the underlying mechanisms of the symptom. Minute ventilation (V'E), tidal volume (VT) and inspiratory capacity (IC) were measured in 22 stable asthmatic patients, and the sensation of dyspnoea during Mch inhalation and sCPET was quantitatively (Borg scale) and qualitatively (descriptors) assessed. The work rate and oxygen uptake (V'O2) were also measured during sCPET. Airway obstruction and hyperinflation, as measured by IC reduction, were the best correlates for dyspnoea with Mch. During sCPET, changes in WR, V'O2, V'E and VT significantly correlated with Borg score, with V'E being the best predictor of dyspnoea; IC decreased in eight patients. Furthermore, chest tightness (68%) was the highest reported descriptor during Mch inhalation, whereas work/effort (72%) was the highest during sCPET. In conclusion, obstruction/hyperinflation and work rate are highly reliable predictors of Borg rating of dyspnoea during methacholine inhalation and short cardiopulmonary exercise testing, respectively. Regardless of the global score of intensity dyspnoea, different descriptors may be selected by patients during short cardiopulmonary exercise testing and methacholine inhalation. Various qualities of dyspnoea result from different pathophysiological abnormalities.
    European Respiratory Journal 05/2006; 27(4):742-7. · 7.13 Impact Factor