Lianwei Peng

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peping, Beijing, China

Are you Lianwei Peng?

Claim your profile

Publications (20)147.57 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: RNA editing is a posttranscriptional process that covalently alters the sequence of RNA molecules and plays important biological roles in both animals and land plants. In flowering plants, RNA editing converts specific cytidine residues to uridine in both plastid and mitochondrial transcripts. Previous studies identified pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing proteins as site-specific recognition factors for cytidine targets in RNA sequences. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying RNA editing was largely unknown. Here, we report that protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase 1 (PPO1), an enzyme that catalyzes protoporphyrinogen IX into protoporphyrin IX in the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, plays an unexpected role in editing multiple sites of plastid RNA transcripts, most of which encode subunits of the NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH), in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified multiple organellar RNA editing factors (MORFs), including MORF2, MORF8, and MORF9, that interact with PPO1. We found that two conserved motifs within the 22-aa region at the N terminus of PPO1 are essential for its interaction with MORFs, its RNA editing function, and subsequently, its effect on NDH activity. However, transgenic plants lacking key domains for the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic activity of PPO1 exhibit normal RNA editing. Furthermore, MORF2 and MORF9 interact with three PPRs or related proteins required for editing of ndhB and ndhD sites. These results reveal that the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic enzyme PPO1 is required for plastid RNA editing, acting as a regulator that promotes the stability of MORF proteins through physical interaction.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/2014; 111(5):2023-8. · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sigma factor is a subunit of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) that regulates the transcription of plastid-encoded genes by recognizing a set of promoters. Sigma factors have increased in copy number and have diversified during the evolution of land plants, but details of this process remain unknown. Liverworts represent the basal group of embryophytes and are expected to retain the ancestral features of land plants. In liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha L.), we isolated and characterized a T-DNA-tagged mutant (Mpsig1) of sigma factor 1 (MpSIG1). The mutant did not show any visible phenotypes, implying that MpSIG1 function is redundant with that of other sigma factors. However, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and RNA gel blot analysis revealed that genes related to photosynthesis were down-regulated, resulting in the minor reduction of some protein complexes. The transcript levels of genes clustered in the petL, psaA, psbB, psbK, and psbE operons of liverwort were lower than those in the wild type, a result similar to that in the SIG1 defective mutant in rice (Oryza sativa). Overexpression analysis revealed primitive functional divergence between the SIG1 and SIG2 proteins in bryophytes, whereas these proteins still retain functional redundancy. We also discovered that the predominant sigma factor for ndhF mRNA expression has been diversified in liverwort, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice. Our study shows the ancestral function of SIG1 and the process of functional partitioning (subfunctionalization) of sigma factors during the evolution of land plants.
    Genome Biology and Evolution 09/2013; · 4.76 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Compared with small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) in other organisms, those in plants are the most abundant and diverse. However, the molecular mechanisms by which sHSPs are involved in cell protection remain unknown. Here, we characterized the role of HSP21, a plastid nucleoid-localized sHSP, in chloroplast development under heat stress. We show that an Arabidopsis thaliana knockout mutant of HSP21 had an ivory phenotype under heat stress. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, run-on transcription, RNA gel blot, and polysome association analyses demonstrated that HSP21 is involved in plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcription. We found that the plastid nucleoid protein pTAC5 was an HSP21 target. pTAC5 has a C4-type zinc finger similar to that of Escherichia coli DnaJ and zinc-dependent disulfide isomerase activity. Reduction of pTAC5 expression by RNA interference led to similar phenotypic effects as observed in hsp21. HSP21 and pTAC5 formed a complex that was associated mainly with the PEP complex. HSP21 and pTAC5 were associated with the PEP complex not only during transcription initiation, but also during elongation and termination. Our results suggest that HSP21 and pTAC5 are required for chloroplast development under heat stress by maintaining PEP function.
    The Plant Cell 08/2013; · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To gain insights into the molecular details of photosystem I (PSI) biogenesis, we characterized the PsbP-domain protein1 (ppd1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that specifically lacks PSI activity. Deletion of PPD1 results in an inability of the mutant to grow photoautotrophically and a specific loss of the stable PSI complex. Unaltered transcription and translation of plastid-encoded PSI genes indicate that PPD1 acts at the posttranslational level. In vivo protein labeling experiments reveal that the rate of synthesis of PSI reaction center proteins PsaA/B in ppd1 is comparable to that of wild-type plants, whereas the rate of turnover of PsaA/B proteins is higher in ppd1 than in wild-type plants. With increasing leaf age, PPD1 content decreases considerably, while PSI content remains constant. PPD1 is a nuclear-encoded thylakoid lumenal protein and is associated with PSI but is not an integral subunit of PSI. Biochemical and molecular analyses reveal that PPD1 interacts directly and specifically with PsaB and PsaA. Yeast two-hybrid experiments show that PPD1 interacts with some lumenal loops of PsaB and PsaA. Our results suggest that PPD1 is a PSI assembly factor that assists the proper folding and integration of PsaB and PsaA into the thylakoid membrane.
    The Plant Cell 12/2012; · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH) mediates photosystem I cyclic electron transport and chlororespiration in thylakoids. Recently, substantial progress has been made in understanding the structure of NDH, but our knowledge of its assembly has been limited. In this study, a series of interactive proteomic analyses identified several stroma-localized factors required for the assembly of a stroma-protruding arm of NDH (subcomplex A). In addition to further characterization of the previously identified CHLORORESPIRATORY REDUCTION1 (CRR1), CRR6, and CRR7, two novel stromal proteins, CRR41 and CRR42, were discovered. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking these proteins are specifically defective in the accumulation of subcomplex A. A total of 10 mutants lacking subcomplex A, including crr27/cpn60β4, which is specifically defective in the folding of NdhH, and four mutants lacking NdhL-NdhO subunits, were extensively characterized. We propose a model for subcomplex A assembly: CRR41, NdhO, and native NdhH, as well as unknown factors, are first assembled to form an NDH subcomplex A assembly intermediate (NAI500). Subsequently, NdhJ, NdhM, NdhK, and NdhI are incorporated into NAI500 to form NAI400. CRR1, CRR6, and CRR42 are involved in this process. CRR7 is likely to be involved in the final step, in which the fully assembled NAI, including NdhN, is inserted into thylakoids.
    The Plant Cell 01/2012; 24(1):202-14. · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Type I chaperonins are large, double-ring complexes present in bacteria (GroEL), mitochondria (Hsp60), and chloroplasts (Cpn60), which are involved in mediating the folding of newly synthesized, translocated, or stress-denatured proteins. In Escherichia coli, GroEL comprises 14 identical subunits and has been exquisitely optimized to fold its broad range of substrates. However, multiple Cpn60 subunits with different expression profiles have evolved in chloroplasts. Here, we show that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, the minor subunit Cpn60β4 forms a heterooligomeric Cpn60 complex with Cpn60α1 and Cpn60β1-β3 and is specifically required for the folding of NdhH, a subunit of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH). Other Cpn60β subunits cannot complement the function of Cpn60β4. Furthermore, the unique C-terminus of Cpn60β4 is required for the full activity of the unique Cpn60 complex containing Cpn60β4 for folding of NdhH. Our findings suggest that this unusual kind of subunit enables the Cpn60 complex to assist the folding of some particular substrates, whereas other dominant Cpn60 subunits maintain a housekeeping chaperonin function by facilitating the folding of other obligate substrates.
    PLoS Biology 04/2011; 9(4):e1001040. · 12.69 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Some subunits of chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) are related to those of the respiratory complex I, and NDH mediates photosystem I (PSI) cyclic electron flow. Despite extensive surveys, the electron donor and its binding subunits have not been identified. Here, we identified three novel components required for NDH activity. CRRJ and CRRL are J- and J-like proteins, respectively, and are components of NDH subcomplex A. CRR31 is an Src homology 3 domain-like fold protein, and its C-terminal region may form a tertiary structure similar to that of PsaE, a ferredoxin (Fd) binding subunit of PSI, although the sequences are not conserved between CRR31 and PsaE. Although CRR31 can accumulate in thylakoids independently of NDH, its accumulation requires CRRJ, and CRRL accumulation depends on CRRJ and NDH. CRR31 was essential for the efficient operation of Fd-dependent plastoquinone reduction in vitro. The phenotype of crr31 pgr5 suggested that CRR31 is required for NDH activity in vivo. We propose that NDH functions as a PGR5-PGRL1 complex-independent Fd:plastoquinone oxidoreductase in chloroplasts and rename it the NADH dehydrogenase-like complex.
    The Plant Cell 04/2011; 23(4):1480-93. · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION 3 (PGR3) contains 27 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motifs and belongs to the P-subfamily. Previous studies have suggested that PGR3 functions in the stabilization of petL operon RNA and also in the translation of petL and one, or some, of the 11 plastid ndh genes encoding subunits of chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH). The pgr3-3 allele has been suggested to be specifically defective in the putative PGR3 function of translation. Herein, we show that the polysome association of the monocistronic petL transcript is impaired in pgr3-3. We detected sequences weakly conserved in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of petL and ndhA, and these putative elements were recognized by recombinant PGR3 in vitro. Previously, pgr3-2 was shown to be specifically defective in stabilizing petL operon RNA and to accumulate NDH at wild-type levels. Consistent with this pgr3-2 phenotype, we show here that a recombinant protein carrying the pgr3-2 mutation in the 12th PPR motif bound to the 5' UTR of ndhA but not of petL. This indicates that a single amino acid alteration changes the binding specificity of PGR3. In contrast, the recombinant protein carrying the pgr3-3 mutation in the final, 27th, incomplete PPR motif can bind to both petL and ndhA 5' UTRs, suggesting that the C-terminal end of PGR3 is not required for binding to targets but is essential for translation of petL and probably also ndhA. Our results fully support the model in which PGR3 recognizes two target sequences and is involved in multiple functions, i.e. stabilizing RNA and activating translation.
    The Plant Journal 04/2011; 67(2):318-27. · 6.58 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Lianwei Peng, Toshiharu Shikanai
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In higher plants, the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH) interacts with photosystem I (PSI) to form the NDH-PSI supercomplex via two minor light-harvesting complex I (LHCI) proteins, Lhca5 and Lhca6. Previously, we showed that in lhca5 and lhca6, NDH still associates with PSI to form smaller versions of the NDH-PSI supercomplex, although their molecular masses are far smaller than that of the full-size NDH-PSI supercomplex. In this study, we show that the NDH complex is present in the monomeric form in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lhca5 lhca6, implying that NDH interacts with multiple copies of PSI. NDH subunit levels were slightly reduced in immature leaves and more drastically (approximately 50%) in mature leaves of the lhca5 lhca6 double mutant compared with the wild type. Chlorophyll fluorescence analyses detected NDH activity of lhca5 lhca6, suggesting that the supercomplex formation is not essential for NDH activity. However, the severe phenotypes of the lhca5 lhca6 proton gradient regulation5 triple mutant in both plant growth rate and photosynthesis suggest that the function of NDH was impaired in this mutant in vivo. Accumulation of NDH subunits was drastically reduced in lhca5 lhca6 when the light intensity was shifted from 50 to 500 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Furthermore, the half-life of NDH subunits, especially that of NDH18, was shorter in monomeric NDH than in the NDH-PSI supercomplex under the high-light conditions. We propose that NDH-PSI supercomplex formation stabilizes NDH and that the process is especially required under stress conditions.
    Plant physiology 01/2011; 155(4):1629-39. · 6.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Eleven genes (ndhA-ndhK) encoding proteins homologous to the subunits of bacterial and mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase (complex I) were found in the plastid genome of most land plants. These genes encode subunits of the chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) complex involved in photosystem I (PSI) cyclic electron transport and chlororespiration. Although the chloroplast NDH is believed to be closely and functionally related to the cyanobacterial NDH-1L complex, extensive proteomic, genetic and bioinformatic studies have discovered many novel subunits that are specific to higher plants. On the basis of extensive mutant characterization, the chloroplast NDH complex is divided into four parts, the A, B, membrane and lumen subcomplexes, of which subunits in the B and lumen subcomplexes are specific to higher plants. These results suggest that the structure of NDH has been drastically altered during the evolution of land plants. Furthermore, chloroplast NDH interacts with multiple copies of PSI to form the unique NDH-PSI supercomplex. Two minor light-harvesting-complex I (LHCI) proteins, Lhca5 and Lhca6, are required for the specific interaction between NDH and PSI. The evolution of chloroplast NDH in land plants may be required for development of the function of NDH to alleviate oxidative stress in chloroplasts. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the subunit composition and structure of the chloroplast NDH complex, as well as the information on some factors involved in its assembly. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 10/2010; 1807(8):945-53. · 4.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Lianwei Peng, Wenhe Cai, Toshiharu Shikanai
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In higher plants, the chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) complex mediates chlororespiration and photosystem I (PSI) cyclic electron transport in thylakoid membranes. Because of its low abundance and fragility, our knowledge on the assembly of chloroplast NDH is very limited, and some nuclear-encoded factors may be involved in this process. We show here that two Arabidopsis proteins, CHLORORESPIRATORY REDUCTION 6 (CRR6) and CRR7, which were previously identified in mutants specifically defective in NDH accumulation, are present in the stroma, and their stability is independent of the NDH complex, suggesting that they are unlikely to be NDH subunits. Blue native PAGE analysis showed that the accumulation of NDH subcomplex A, which is a core part of NDH that is conserved in divergent species, was specifically impaired in the crr6 and crr7-1 mutants. However, the expression of plastid-encoded genes encoding the subcomplex A subunits was not affected, suggesting that CRR6 and CRR7 are involved in post-translational steps during the biogenesis of subcomplex A. We also discovered that a substantial quantity of NdhH is present in several protein complexes in the chloroplast stroma, possibly as early assembly intermediates of subcomplex A. Although the accumulation of these stromal complexes was not affected in crr6 or crr7-1, CRR6 was co-purified with NdhH, implying that CRR6 functions in the later step of subcomplex-A biogenesis. Accumulation of CRR7 was independent of that of CRR6; we propose that CRR7 functions in a different step in subcomplex-A biogenesis from CRR6.
    The Plant Journal 04/2010; 63(2):203-11. · 6.58 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In higher plants, the chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) complex mediates photosystem I (PSI) cyclic and chlororespiratory electron transport. We reported previously that NDH interacts with the PSI complex to form a supercomplex (NDH-PSI). In this study, NDH18 and FKBP16-2 (FK506 Binding Protein 16-2), detected in the NDH-PSI supercomplex by mass spectrometry, were shown to be NDH subunits by the analysis of their knockdown lines. On the basis of extensive mutant characterization, we propose a structural model for chloroplast NDH, whereby NDH is divided into four subcomplexes. The subcomplex A and membrane subcomplex are conserved in cyanobacteria, but the subcomplex B and lumen subcomplex are specific to chloroplasts. Two minor light-harvesting complex I proteins, Lhca5 and Lhca6, were required for the full-size NDH-PSI supercomplex formation. Similar to crr pgr5 double mutants that completely lack cyclic electron flow activity around PSI, the lhca6 pgr5 double mutant exhibited a severe defect in growth. Consistent with the impaired NDH activity, photosynthesis was also severely affected in mature leaves of lhca6 pgr5. We conclude that chloroplast NDH became equipped with the novel subcomplexes and became associated with PSI during the evolution of land plants, and this process may have facilitated the efficient operation of NDH.
    The Plant Cell 11/2009; 21(11):3623-40. · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Several hundred nucleus-encoded factors are required for regulating gene expression in plant organelles. Among them, the most numerous are the members of the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family. We found that PPR protein OTP82 is essential for RNA editing of the ndhB-9 and ndhG-1 sites within transcripts encoding subunits of chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase. Despite the defects in RNA editing, otp82 did not show any phenotypes in NDH activity, stability or interaction with photosystem I, suggesting that the RNA editing events mediated by OTP82 are functionally silent even though they induce amino acid alterations. In agreement with this result, both sites are partially edited even in the wild type, implying the possibility that a single gene produces heterogeneous proteins that are functionally equivalent. Although only five nucleotides separate the ndhB-8 and ndhB-9 sites, the ndhB-8 site is normally edited in otp82 mutants, suggesting that both sites are recognized by different PPR proteins. OTP82 falls into the DYW subclass containing conserved C-terminal E and DYW motifs. As in CRR22 and CRR28, the DYW motif present in OTP82 is not essential for RNA editing in vivo.
    The Plant Journal 10/2009; 61(2):339-49. · 6.58 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To gain insight into the molecular mechanism of RNA editing, we have characterized the low psii accumulation66 (lpa66) Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, which displays a high chlorophyll fluorescence phenotype. Its perturbed chlorophyll fluorescence is reflected in reduced levels of photosystem II (PSII) proteins. In vivo protein labeling showed that synthesis rates of the PSII reaction center protein D1/D2 were lower, and turnover rates of PSII core proteins higher, than in wild-type counterparts. The assembly of newly synthesized proteins into PSII occurs in the lpa66 mutant but with reduced efficiency compared with the wild type. LPA66 encodes a chloroplast protein of the pentatricopeptide repeat family. In lpa66 mutants, editing of psbF that converts serine to phenylalanine is specifically impaired. Thus, LPA66 is specifically required for editing the psbF transcripts in Arabidopsis, and the amino acid alternation due to lack of editing strongly affects the efficiency of the assembly of PSII complexes.
    Plant physiology 06/2009; 150(3):1260-71. · 6.56 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) complex is involved in photosystem I (PSI) cyclic and chlororespiratory electron transport in higher plants. Although biochemical and genetic evidence for its subunit composition has accumulated, it is not enough to explain the complexes putative activity of NAD(P)H-dependent plastoquinone reduction. We analyzed the NDH complex by using blue native PAGE and found that it interacts with PSI to form a novel supercomplex. Mutants lacking NdhL and NdhM accumulated a pigment-protein complex with a slightly lower molecular mass than that of the NDH-PSI supercomplex; this may be an intermediate supercomplex including PSI. This intermediate is unstable in mutants lacking NdhB, NdhD, or NdhF, implying that it includes some NDH subunits. Analysis of thylakoid membrane complexes using sucrose density gradient centrifugation supported the presence of the NDH-PSI supercomplex in vivo. Although the NDH complex exists as a monomer in etioplasts, it interacts with PSI to form a supercomplex within 48 h during chloroplast development.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 11/2008; 283(50):34873-9. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) complex functions in PSI cyclic and chlororespiratory electron transport in higher plants. Eleven plastid-encoded and three nuclear-encoded subunits have been identified so far, but the entire subunit composition, especially of the putative electron donor-binding module, is unclear. We isolated Arabidopsis thaliana crr23 (chlororespiratory reduction) mutants lacking NDH activity according to the absence of a transient increase in Chl fluorescence after actinic light illumination. Although CRR23 shows similarity to the NdhL subunit of cyanobacterial NDH-1, it has three transmembrane domains rather than the two in cyanobacterial NdhL. Unlike cyanobacterial NdhL, CRR23 is essential for stabilizing the NDH complex, which in turn is required for the accumulation of CRR23. Furthermore, CRR23 and NdhH, a subunit of chloroplast NDH, co-localized in blue-native gel. All the results indicate that CRR23 is an ortholog of cyanobacterial ndhL in Arabidopsis, despite its diversity of structure and function.
    Plant and Cell Physiology 06/2008; 49(5):835-42. · 4.13 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To elucidate the molecular mechanism of photosystem II (PSII) assembly, we characterized the low psii accumulation2 (lpa2) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which is defective in the accumulation of PSII supercomplexes. The levels and processing patterns of the RNAs encoding the PSII subunits are unaltered in the mutant. In vivo protein-labeling experiments showed that the synthesis of CP43 (for chlorophyll a binding protein) was greatly reduced, but CP47, D1, and D2 were synthesized at normal rates in the lpa2-1 mutant. The newly synthesized CP43 was rapidly degraded in lpa2-1, and the turnover rates of D1 and D2 were higher in lpa2-1 than in wild-type plants. The newly synthesized PSII proteins were assembled into PSII complexes, but the assembly of PSII was less efficient in the mutant than in wild-type plants. LPA2 encodes an intrinsic thylakoid membrane protein, which is not an integral subunit of PSII. Yeast two-hybrid assays indicated that LPA2 interacts with the PSII core protein CP43 but not with the PSII reaction center proteins D1 and D2. Moreover, direct interactions of LPA2 with Albino3 (Alb3), which is involved in thylakoid membrane biogenesis and cell division, were also detected. Thus, the results suggest that LPA2, which appears to form a complex with Alb3, is involved in assisting CP43 assembly within PSII.
    The Plant Cell 07/2007; 19(6):1980-93. · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The widely distributed DEGP proteases play important roles in the degradation of damaged and misfolded proteins. Arabidopsis thaliana contains 16 DEGP-like proteases, four of which are located in the chloroplast. Here, we show that DEG5 and DEG8 form a hexamer in the thylakoid lumen and that recombinant DEG8 is proteolytically active toward both a model substrate (beta-casein) and photodamaged D1 protein of photosystem II (PSII), producing 16-kD N-terminal and 18-kD C-terminal fragments. Inactivation of DEG5 and DEG8 resulted in increased sensitivity to photoinhibition. Turnover of newly synthesized D1 protein in the deg5 deg8 double mutant was impaired, and the degradation of D1 in the presence of the chloroplast protein synthesis inhibitor lincomycin under high-light treatment was slowed in the mutants. Thus, DEG5 and DEG8 are important for efficient turnover of the D1 protein and for protection against photoinhibition in vivo. The deg5 deg8 double mutant showed increased photosensitivity and reduced rates of D1 degradation compared with single mutants of deg5 and deg8. A 16-kD N-terminal degradation fragment of the D1 protein was detected in wild-type plants but not in the deg5 deg8 mutant following in vivo photoinhibition. Therefore, our results suggest that DEG5 and DEG8 have a synergistic function in the primary cleavage of the CD loop of the PSII reaction center protein D1.
    The Plant Cell 05/2007; 19(4):1347-61. · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To gain insight into the processes involved in photosystem II (PSII) biogenesis and maintenance, we characterized the low psii accumulation1 (lpa1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which generally accumulates lower than wild-type levels of the PSII complex. In vivo protein labeling experiments showed that synthesis of the D1 and D2 proteins was greatly reduced in the lpa1 mutant, while other plastid-encoded proteins were translated at rates similar to the wild type. In addition, turnover rates of the PSII core proteins CP47, CP43, D1, and D2 were higher in lpa1 than in wild-type plants. The newly synthesized PSII proteins were assembled into functional protein complexes, but the assembly was less efficient in the mutant. LPA1 encodes a chloroplast protein that contains two tetratricopeptide repeat domains and is an intrinsic membrane protein but not an integral subunit of PSII. Yeast two-hybrid studies revealed that LPA1 interacts with D1 but not with D2, cytochrome b6, or Alb3. Thus, LPA1 appears to be an integral membrane chaperone that is required for efficient PSII assembly, probably through direct interaction with the PSII reaction center protein D1.
    The Plant Cell 05/2006; 18(4):955-69. · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • Source

Publication Stats

575 Citations
147.57 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Chinese Academy of Sciences
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2008–2012
    • Kyoto University
      • Department of Botany
      Kyoto, Kyoto-fu, Japan
    • Kyushu University
      • Faculty of Agriculture
      Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka-ken, Japan
  • 2006–2009
    • Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology
      • • Research Center for Plant Photosynthesis
      • • Laboratory of Photosynthesis and Environmental Biology
      Beijing, Beijing Shi, China