Koel Ghosh

University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota, United States

Are you Koel Ghosh?

Claim your profile

Publications (15)10.3 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The study aimed to (i) segment parents of early adolescents into subgroups according to their Ca-rich-food (CRF) practices and perceptions regarding early adolescent CRF intake and (ii) determine whether Ca intake of parents and early adolescents differed by subgroup. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 509 parents and their early adolescent children completed a questionnaire in 2006-2007 to assess parent CRF practices and perceptions and to estimate parent and child Ca intakes. Self-administered questionnaires were completed in community settings or homes across nine US states. Parents self-reporting as Asian, Hispanic or non-Hispanic White with a child aged 10-13 years were recruited through youth or parent events. Three parent CRF practice/perception segments were identified, including 'Dedicated-Milk Providers/Drinkers' (49 %), 'Water Regulars' (30 %) and 'Sweet-Drink-Permissive Parents' (23 %). Dedicated-Milk Providers/Drinkers were somewhat older and more likely to be non-Hispanic White than other groups. Ca intakes from all food sources, milk/dairy foods and milk only, and milk intakes, were higher among early adolescent children of Dedicated-Milk Providers/Drinkers compared with early adolescents of parents in other segments. Soda pop intakes were highest for early adolescents with parents in the Water Regulars group than other groups. Dedicated-Milk Providers/Drinkers scored higher on culture/tradition, health benefits and ease of use/convenience subscales and lower on a dairy/milk intolerance subscale and were more likely to report eating family dinners daily than parents in the other groups. Parent education programmes should address CRF practices/perceptions tailored to parent group to improve Ca intake of early adolescent children.
    Public Health Nutrition 06/2011; 15(2):331-40. DOI:10.1017/S1368980011001133 · 2.48 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study uses segmentation analyses to identify five distinct subgroups of U.S. midlife women (n = 200) based on their prevailing attitudes toward food and its preparation and consumption. Mean age of the women is 46 years and they are mostly White (86%), highly educated, and employed. Attitude segments (clusters of women sharing similar attitudes) are a significant predictor of obesity indicators. Mean body mass index and percentage of body fat are lower for the "concerned about nutrition" attitude segment compared with the "guiltridden dieter" and "impulsive eater" attitude segments. Mean waist circumference is highest in "impulsive eater" compared with the "concerned about nutrition" segment. Those in the "busy cooking avoider" segment have a significantly higher energy intake compared with women in other attitude segments. Tailoring a weight management intervention according to attitude segments of midlife women may enhance effectiveness.
    Health Education &amp Behavior 10/2009; 36(6):1082-94. DOI:10.1177/1090198109335653 · 1.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose – In the light of lessons learned from recent disasters (The London subway bombings, and Hurricane Katrina), it has become increasingly clear that supply chain partners as well as government agencies need to be prepared to communicate effectively to consumers and customers before, during and after a disaster. Effective communication can minimize confusion and harm to company reputations, to consumers, the economy and the nation. Incorporating consistent communications into supply chain management (SCM) plans used by all parties in the supply chain will enhance competitiveness of the whole chain and speed recovery from potentially disastrous events. Findings from a national survey of consumer's attitudes about terrorism provide information about the development of targeted and effective communications. Design/methodology/approach – Based on a survey of more than 4,000 US consumers, this study used “predictive segmentation” which consists of a canonical factor analysis relating general consumer attitudes and values to their more specific fears and concerns about terrorism. A clustering of consumers then identifies six diverse consumer segments providing a framework for the development of communication strategies. Findings – Results from this study demonstrate that people can be grouped based on their general attitudes and values in such a way that their diversity can be captured in a simple framework of segments each reflecting striking differences in the level of concern over potential terrorist attacks. Practical implications – Guidance is offered for the development of communication strategies based on the information needs and media behavior of each consumer segment to mitigate the impact of a potential terrorist attack or catastrophic food safety breaches. It provides practical and logical extension of former studies that suggest incorporating consumers, attitudes into SCM and business continuity plans. Originality/value – This study leverages a common and proven marketing research approach – segmentation – used in private industry for the marketing of goods and service. It applies this method to defining segments of consumers based on their attitudes and concerns about terrorism that will be useful in supply chain communication management.
    International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management 06/2009; 39(5):365-403. DOI:10.1108/09600030910973733 · 1.80 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the relationship between type of eating occasion based on need state segments experienced by 200 midlife women (46 ± 6 years) and food group, nutrient, and energy intake. Women completed an Eating Occasion Questionnaire for 3 eating occasions over a 3-day period for which they maintained diet records. Cluster analysis segmented 559 eating occasions into six need states. Energy, total fat, and cholesterol consumption per occasion were highest in “routine family meal” occasions of which more than 60% were dinner and eaten at home with their children. The percentage of eating occasions in which fruits/vegetables were eaten was also highest in “routine family meal,” followed by “healthy regimen.” More than half of “indulgent escape” eating occasions occurred away from home and about one-third were experienced as a snack. Saturated fat and sweets intakes were the highest in the “indulgent escapes” occasions. Eating occasions experienced by women according to needs surrounding the occasion should be considered when developing tailored interventions to improve intake.
    Appetite 02/2009; DOI:10.1016/j.appet.2008.09.005 · 2.69 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Koel Ghosh, Benjamin Senauer
  • American Journal of Agricultural Economics 12/2008; 90(5):1272-1278. DOI:10.1111/j.1467-8276.2008.01216.x · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Agricultural Economics 02/2008; 90(5):1272-1278. · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: On October 23, 2008, The Food Industry Center in collaboration with the Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy presented the symposium, “Future Food Scarcities? Global Causes, Local Consequences.” Leaders from the food industry, academia and the public sector discussed the causes and consequences of rising food prices and their impact on food supplies, food companies, consumption, health and public policy in the United States and around the globe.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This report details the activities and findings of a three year research project funded by The National Center for Food Protection and Defense at the University of Minnesota, a Homeland Security Center of Excellence. The project was conducted by three universities each taking responsibility for collecting data on a different part of the food supply chain. The overall goal was to ascertain the food defense practices and readiness of food firms along the food supply chain to defend their food and other assets from a potential terrorist attack. David Closs in the Supply Chain Management Center at Michigan State University was the named leader of the overall project. Dr. Closs and his colleagues investigated the practices of food manufacturers and some wholesalers. Chip White and Alan Erera from the Georgia Institute of Technology investigated the practices of trucking companies and Jean Kinsey and colleagues at The Food Industry Center at the University of Minnesota investigated the food defense practices of retailers (grocers and foodservice) and wholesalers who supply both these channels. This report focuses on the work of The Food Industry Center and the benchmarks of the retail and wholesale food companies. This project addresses the need to increase awareness of food system vulnerabilities among retail and wholesale food companies and enhance their preparedness for catastrophic incidents. Initial interviews and pilot surveys established the management and operations practices at retail, wholesale, and food service companies that lead to tightened security at a variety of food companies. The lessons learned from the initial stage of the project were incorporated into a comprehensive survey to ascertain the best practices in management, employment, communication, and information preparedness among firms in the wholesale/retail end of the food supply chain. The project will produce a benchmark report against which food companies can judge their relative level of pre
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the light of lessons learned from recent disasters (The London Subway Bombings, and Hurricane Katrina), it has become clear that government and private organizations need to be prepared to communicate effectively with consumers before, during and after a disaster in order to minimize harm to consumers and to the nation. Findings from a national survey of attitudes of U.S. Residents about terrorism provides information for the development of such communications. Using “Predictive Segmentation” this study demonstrates that consumers can be grouped based on their general attitudes and values in such a way that their diversity can be captured in a simple framework of six segments reflecting striking differences with respect to their level of concern over potential terrorist attacks. The segments were named as follows: “Fear Tethered,” “Principled & Self-Disciplined,” “Intelligentsia,” “Predestinarians,” “Optimistic & Self-Reliant,” and “Uncommitted C’est la vie.” Each of these segments differ on their preferences for information should an attack happen, and on their preferred source of news. Based on their information needs and media behavior, some preliminary guidance is offered for the development of communication strategies for each segment.
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: U.S. residents are very concerned about future terrorist attacks and they are willing to commit substantial sums to prevent further terrorist acts. Protecting against another 9/11 style incident is important, but U.S. residents are more concerned about protecting the food supply system and preventing release of chemical or biological agents in public areas. On average respondents would allocate 13.3 percent more to protect the food supply chain and 12.0 percent more to protect against release of a toxic chemical or biological agent than they would to protect against another terrorist attack using hijacked aircraft. Approximately $5 billion is currently spent to protect civil aviation. The 2006 budget provided $8.6 billion of fiscal authority for programs protecting against all types of catastrophic terrorist incidents, including protection against radiological or nuclear incidents, as well as protecting the food supply and preventing chemical or biological attacks. No one would argue that decisions on the size and internal allocation of the nation’s homeland security budget should be made on the basis of a public opinion survey, but this survey indicates that Americans would likely support additional spending to defend the food system and protect against release of a chemical or biological agent.
  • Benjamin Senauer, Koel Ghosh, Yu Wang
  • Jean D. Kinsey, Koel Ghosh
  • Source