K Swift

University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States

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Publications (5)10.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The objective was to compare pregnancy rates and pregnancy losses in lactating dairy cows that were diagnosed not pregnant and re-inseminated following either the Ovsynch or Heatsynch protocols. Also evaluated were the effects of stages of the estrous cycle, ovarian cysts and anestrus on pregnancy rates for both treatments. Non-pregnant cows (n = 332) as determined by ultrasonography on day 27 post-AI (study day 0) were divided into two groups. Cows in the Ovsynch group (n = 166) received GnRH on day 0, PGF2alpha on day 7, GnRH on day 9, and timed AI (TAI) 16 h later (day 10). Cows in the Heatsynch group (n = 166) received GnRH on day 0, PGF2alpha on day 7, estradiol cypionate (ECP) on day 8, and TAI 48 h later (day 10). Cows detected in estrus on days 8 and 9 were inseminated and included in the study. On day 0, cows were classified according to different stages of the estrous cycle, or presence of ovarian cysts or anestrus. Pregnancy rates were evaluated 27, 45 and 90 days after resynchronized AI. Overall, there was no difference in pregnancy rates on days 27, 45 and 90 between cows in the Ovsynch (25.2, 17.5, and 13.9%) and Heatsynch (25.8, 19.9, and 16.1%) groups. There was no difference in pregnancy losses from days 27 to 45 and days 45 to 90 for cows in the Ovsynch (25.0 and 17.9%) and Heatsynch (14.7 and 10.3%) groups. However, pregnancy rates were increased when cows in metestrus were subjected to the Heatsynch protocol and cows with ovarian cysts were subjected to the Ovsynch protocol.
    Theriogenology 05/2005; 63(6):1617-27. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pregnancy rates were compared in lactating dairy cows (n = 1083) assigned to protocols for resynchronization of ovulation based on stages of the estrous cycle, or presence of ovarian cysts or anestrus. Cows were detected not pregnant by ultrasonography 30 d after a previous AI (study day 0) and classified as diestrus, metestrus, proestrus, with ovarian cysts or anestrus. Cows in diestrus (January-May) were assigned to either Ovsynch (GnRH day 0, PGF2alpha day 7, GnRH day 9, and timed-AI [TAI] 16 h later; n = 96), or Quicksynch (PGF2alpha day 0, estradiol cypionate [ECP] day 1, AI at detected estrus [AIDE] on day 2, or TAI on day 3; n = 96). Cows in diestrus (June-December) were assigned to either Ovsynch (n = 156) or Modified Quicksynch (PGF2alpha day 0, ECP day 1, AIDE days 2 and 3, and to Ovsynch on day 4 if not detected in estrus; n = 142). Cows in metestrus were assigned either to Ovsynch (n = 68), Heatsynch (GnRH day 0, PGF2alpha day 7, ECP day 8, AIDE day 9, or TAI day 10; n = 62), or GnRH + Ovsynch (GnRH on day 0, followed by Ovsynch on day 8; n = 64). Cows in proestrus, with ovarian cysts, or anestrus were assigned to either Ovsynch (proestrus n = 89, ovarian cysts n = 97, anestrus n = 8) or GnRH + Ovsynch (proestrus n = 87, ovarian cysts n = 109, anestrus n = 9). Pregnancy rate was evaluated 30, 55 and 90 d after resynchronized AI. For cows in diestrus (January-May), pregnancy rates were higher for Ovsynch (35.9, 29.2 and 26.0%) than for Quicksynch (21.7, 16.7 and 15.6%). For cows in diestrus (June-December), pregnancy rates were similar for Ovsynch (34.4, 24.0 and 23.6%) and Modified Quicksynch (27.1, 26.2 and 21.6%). For cows in metestrus, pregnancy rates were higher for GnRH + Ovsynch (33.3, 24.5 and 20.3%) than for Heatsynch (20.3, 12.9 and 9.8%). For cows with ovarian cysts, pregnancy rates were higher for GnRH + Ovsynch (30.3, 26.6 and 22.9%) than for Ovsynch (20.2, 18.5 and 14.7%). Assignment to resynchronization protocols based on the stages of the estrous cycle, or presence of ovarian cysts improved pregnancy rates.
    Theriogenology 05/2005; 63(6):1628-42. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective was to compare pregnancy rates to resynchronization and timed AI (TAI) protocols in lactating dairy cows that received GnRH at 23 d and were diagnosed not pregnant at 30 d after the pre-enrollment AI. Nonpregnant cows (624) at ultrasonography on day 30 (study day 0) were classified as diestrus (74.8%), metestrus (5.6%) and without a CL (19.5%). Cows in diestrus were assigned either to the GnRH group (PGF2alpha on day 0, GnRH on day 2 and TAI 16 h later, n = 238) or the estradiol cypionate (ECP) group (PGF2alpha on day 0, ECP on day 1, and TAI 36 h later, n = 229). Cows in metestrus were assigned to the Modified Heatsynch Group (GnRH on day 0, PGF(2alpha) on day 7, ECP on day 8 and TAI on day 9, n = 35). Cows without a CL (n = 122) were classified either as proestrus (10.6%), ovarian cysts (7.5%) or anestrus (1.4%), and assigned to factorial treatments (i.e., use of GnRH versus CIDR) to either the GnRH group (GnRH on day 0, PGF2alpha on day 7, GnRH on day 9 and TAI 16 h later, n = 28), the CIDR group (CIDR insert from days 0 to 7, PGF2alpha on day 7, GnRH on day 9 and TAI 16 h later, n = 34), the GnRH + CIDR group (GnRH on day 0, CIDR insert from days 0 to 7, PGF2alpha on day 7, GnRH on day 9 and TAI 16h later, n = 32), and the control group (PGF2alpha on day 7, GnRH on day 9 and TAI 16 h later, n = 28). For cows without a CL, plasma P4 concentrations were determined on days 0, 7, 10 and 17 and ovarian structures determined on days 0, 7 and 17. Pregnancy rates were evaluated at 30, 55 and 90 d after the resynchronized AI. For cows in diestrus, there were no differences in pregnancy rates on days 30, 55 and 90 for cows in the GnRH (27.5, 26.5 and 24.2%) or ECP (29.1, 25.5 and 24.1%) groups. In addition, there were no differences in pregnancy losses between days 30 and 55 and 55 and 90 between the GnRH (7.0 and 8.6%) and ECP (9.8 and 5.4%) groups. For cows without a CL, GnRH on day 0 increased the proportion of cows with a CL on days 7 and 17 and plasma P4 concentration on day 17 in cows with ovarian cysts but not for cows in proestrus. The CIDR insert increased pregnancy rate in cows with ovarian cysts but reduced pregnancy rate for cows in proestrus.
    Theriogenology 05/2005; 63(6):1643-58. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of GnRH (100 microg i.m.) treatment 5 and 15 days after timed insemination (TAI) on pregnancy rate and pregnancy loss in lactating dairy cows subjected to synchronization of ovulation. The study included 831 lactating dairy cows subjected to a Presynch-Ovsynch protocol for first service. On the day of TAI (Day 0), cows were randomly assigned to one of four experimental groups. Cows in Group 1 (n = 214) were treated with GnRH on Day 5; cows in Group 2 (n = 209) were treated with GnRH on Day 15; cows in Group 3 (n = 212) were treated with GnRH on both Day 5 and Day 15; cows in Group 4 (n = 196) were not treated. Pregnancy rate was evaluated at Day 27 and Day 45 after TAI. The interestrus interval and the proportion of cows diagnosed not pregnant based on expression of estrus and insemination before pregnancy diagnosis on Day 27 were determined. The results of this study are: (1) GnRH treatment on Day 5 or Day 15 did not increase pregnancy rate, or reduce pregnancy loss between Day 27 and Day 55 after TAI; (2) cows treated with GnRH on both Day 5 and Day 15 had a lower (P < 0.01) proportion of cows diagnosed not pregnant based on expression of estrus before ultrasonography on Day 27 (26.5%) compared to control cows (52.9%), and these cows had an extended (P = 0.05) interestrus interval (23.4 days vs. 21.5 days); and (3) GnRH treatment on both Day 5 and Day 15 after TAI reduced pregnancy rate on Day 27 (36.8% vs. 44.4% for control cows; P < 0.03) and Day 55 (28.3% vs. 36.2% for control cows; P < 0.01). Therefore, strategies to stimulate CL function using multiple doses of GnRH during the luteal phase need to consider potential negative effects.
    Theriogenology 04/2005; 63(4):1026-37. · 2.08 Impact Factor
  • Reproduction Fertility and Development 12/2003; 16(2):126-127. · 2.58 Impact Factor