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    ABSTRACT: Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative short rod-shaped bacteria that has been recognized as a pathogen of hemorrhagic septicemia and fowl cholera in the veterinary medicine. Infections by this microorganism as seen in the foreign literature vary widely from local infections due to bites and scratches by animals to general infections such as infections of the respiratory tract, sepsis, and meningitis. In Japan, reported cases of P. multocida infections are predominantly local infections, followed by respiratory infection. Recently, death of diabetic patients due to septicemia by this pathogen has also been reported. In this study, we experienced a case of respiratory tract infection in which the pathogen P. multocida subsp. multocida was suggested to have been transmitted from a pet cat by the agreement of the serotype of the bacterial isolates between the patient and the cat. This case was evaluated from the zoonotic viewpoint. The patient was a 68-year-old male who had been followed up since 1982 with a diagnosis of bronchiectasis. After his referral to our hospital, P. multocida subsp. multocida was isolated from his bloody sputum and, then, from the cat kept by the patient. The tow isolates were identical in terms of the biochemical properties, drug susceptibility profile, and serotype (-:1), and the derivation of P. multocida subsp. multocida infection from cat was established for the first time in this report. The incidence of P. multocida infections is increasing in Japan, and particular attention is considered to be needed about these conditions as zoonoses as indicated in "Preventive Measures against Zoonoses Derived from Pet Animals (Dog, Cat)", an official communication from the Ministry of Health and Welfare to related institutions in 1989. Also, to check whether the patient keeps any pet at the clinical inquiry is a practice of bacteriological importance in all fields of medicine.
    Kansenshogaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases 10/1990; 64(9):1200-4.