N O Hollist

Obafemi Awolowo University, Ilesha, Osun, Nigeria

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Publications (8)3.17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Since 1980 we carried out a longitudinal dental survey in Ile-Ife, as a joint study with the dental school of Ife University, Nigeria, being supported by A Grant under The Monbusho International Scientific Research Program for ten years. One thousand one hundred seventy-one children and adults were examined in the 1991 survey. The data were compared with the data in the previous survey and Japanese survey. Results were as follows: 1) Caries prevalence rate and the average number of DMFT were still very low, especially showing that both the caries prevalence and the average number of DMFT decreased in the rural areas because the attrition proceeded faster than the caries, 2) Nigerian deciduous and permanent dentition were larger than in the Japanese in all items measured, 3) the condylar head was transformed from the round shape to the ultra-flat shape with age, 4) there was a fewer incidence of severe periodontal diseases despite of the marked deposition of calculus, 5) with respect to Nigerian foods, there was no difference between the rainy and dry seasons in both the urban and rural communities, 6) the weaning period of the baby is decided by their mother, taking care of the health of the baby, almost all babies at one year to two years and a few at three years and 7) the menu for the breakfast, lunch and supper of the baby was made considering the nutritional aspect of the baby.
    The Bulletin of Tokyo Medical and Dental University 04/1993; 40(1):59-78.
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    ABSTRACT: The response of hard and soft oral tissues to prolonged uninterrupted wearing of a removable partial prosthesis in a Nigerian patient is discussed. To our knowledge only one case has been reported in the literature. In this case additional mucosal changes to the reported caries-free pattern is discussed.
    Australian Dental Journal 05/1992; 37(2):103-6. · 1.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eighty-five children (age in 1981, 3-9 yr) examined in the 1981 survey in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, were seen again in 1986. In addition cross-sectional caries data in a small sample of 6-14-yr-olds were compared with data obtained in 1986. Results show that caries prevalence rate and the average number of DMFT increased slightly in the urban area, but was still very low. Both caries prevalence and the average number of DMFT decreased in rural areas because attrition proceeded faster than did caries.
    Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology 09/1990; 18(4):197-9. · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Six hundred and seventy-three school children from the age of 3 to 20 living in the urban and the rural areas of Nigeria were examined by the Joint Dental Epidemiological Survey in 1986. The survey was funded by the Grant-in-Aid from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and was conducted by both the Japanese survey team and the staff from the University of Ife, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The periodontal state of the children was evaluated according to the Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Needs (CPITN) by WHO (1). The prevalence of periodontal diseases was found to be 84.2% within the sample with a high occurrence of gingivitis and heavy deposits of calculus. However, there was little evidence of damage to the periodontal tissues. This can be attributed to the nature of their diet. The results suggested that there would be an increasing need for well-planned and organized public educational programs for the Nigerian children to promote better oral hygiene coupled with parental involvement in the prevention at home.
    The Bulletin of Tokyo Medical and Dental University 07/1988; 35(1-2):11-7.
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    ABSTRACT: The biting force of 855 Nigerian children and adults from the age of 3 to 60 was recorded in the Joint Dental Epidemiological Survey in Nigeria in 1981. The biting force of the Nigerian rural group (245 males and 178 females) was significantly greater than those of the Nigerian urban group (227 males and 203 females) and the Japanese males and females.
    The Bulletin of Tokyo Medical and Dental University 07/1985; 32(2):41-8.
  • N O Hollist, A O Olusile
    Odonto-stomatologie tropicale = Tropical dental journal 10/1984; 7(3):159-61.
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    ABSTRACT: A joint dental epidemiological survey was carried out in 1981 in the ancient city of Ile-Ife and its environs in the Federal Republic of Nigeria. The survey was made with the University of Ife, Ile-Ife, Oyo State, Nigeria, as the base. The occurrence of caries in 898 Nigerian school children of 509 urban and 389 rural children was compared with the occurrence of caries in the Japanese children. The results showed that the incidence of caries in the Nigerian school children was much lower than that of their Japanese counterpart. However, it is projected that with the increase in the consumption of sweet drinks and food in Nigeria, if superimposed on the existing poor oral hygiene, the incidence of caries will increase greatly.
    The Bulletin of Tokyo Medical and Dental University 07/1984; 31(2):61-72.
  • Odonto-stomatologie tropicale = Tropical dental journal 04/1984; 7(1):9-16.