Joon-Bong Park

Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (5)3.75 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness (R(a)) and microscopic change to irradiated dental implant surfaces in vitro and ultimately to determine the proper pulse energy power and application time for the clinical use of Er:YAG lasers. Anodic oxidized surface implants and sand-blasted, large-grit, and acid-etched (SLA) surface implants were used. Each experimental group of implant surfaces included ten implants. Nine implants were used for the laser irradiation test groups and one for the control group. Each test group was equally divided into three subgroups by irradiated pulse energy power. Using an Er:YAG laser, each subgroup of anodic oxidized surface implants was split into 60-, 100-, and 140-mJ/pulse groups, with each subgroup of SLA surface implants irradiated with a 100-, 140-, or 180-mJ/pulse. Three implants in every test subgroup were respectively irradiated for 1, 1.5, and 2 min. The R(a) values for each specimen were recorded and every specimen was observed by SEM. Irradiation by Er:YAG laser led to a decrease in implant surface roughness that was not statistically significant. In anodic oxidized surfaces, the oxidized layer peeled off of the surface, and cracks appeared on implant surfaces in the 100- and 140-mJ/pulse subgroups. However, with SLA surfaces, no significant change in surface texture could be found on any implant surface in the 100- and 140-mJ/pulse subgroups. The melting and fusion phenomena of implant surfaces were observed with all application times with 180 mJ/pulse irradiation. The SLA implant surfaces are stable with laser intensities of less than 140 mJ/pulse and an irradiation time of less than 2 min. The anodic oxidized surfaces were not stable with laser intensities of 100 mJ/pulse when an Er:YAG laser was used to detoxify implant surfaces.
    Lasers in Medical Science 11/2011; 26(6):767-76. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the inflammatory responses of three widely used suture materials in the keratinized gingiva and buccal mucosa of beagle dogs. Silk, polyglycolic acid, and nylon sutures were placed within the mandibular keratinized gingiva and maxillary buccal mucosa of four male beagle dogs. Biopsies were taken 3, 7, and 14 days after suturing. Specimens were prepared with hematoxylin-eosin stain for evaluation under a light microscope. The suture materials placed in the oral mucosa elicited more inflammatory reactions than did those placed in the keratinized gingiva. The multifilament suture materials caused more inflammatory tissue reactions than did the monofilament suture materials in the oral mucosa. If oral hygiene is well maintained and suture materials are placed in the keratinized gingiva, silk, nylon, and polyglycolic acid are considered to be proper suture materials for oral surgery. However, it is advisable to use monofilament suture materials if the suture site is within the oral mucosa.
    Journal of periodontal & implant science 08/2011; 41(4):185-91.
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    ABSTRACT: Subepithelial connective tissue grafting (SCTG) is a frequently used method in the field of periodontal plastic surgery. There are relatively few reports defining epithelial thickness criteria for palatal mucosal SCTG. The aim of this study was to histologically measure the epithelial thickness of the palatal mucosa in a sample of Korean patients, with the goal of minimizing epithelium-associated complications after root coverage procedures. A total of 30 Korean patients (12 males and 18 females) were enrolled in this study. To measure epithelial thicknesses, palatal mucosa adjacent to premolars and molars was obtained during procurement of SCTG. The effects of donor site, age and gender on the thickness of the epithelium were assessed and compared by histomorphometric analysis. The mean epithelial thickness of the palatal mucosa in our 30 patients was 430.63 μm, ranging from 113 to 823 μm. Epithelial thickness was not associated with donor site or age, but there were significant differences between genders, with males having much thicker palates than females.
    The Anatomical Record Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology 11/2010; 293(11):1966-70. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    The Journal of The Korean Academy of Periodontology. 01/2009; 39(1).
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    Jae-seok Kim, Joon-Bong Park, Man-sup Lee, Yeek Herr
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to evaluate histologically the tissue response and resorption of various nonresorbable and resorbable suture materials used for periodontal surgery, using a subcutaneous model on the dorsal surface of the rat. In this study, 10 Sprague-Dawley male rats (mean BW 150gm) were used and the commercially available materials included polyglactin 910, pain gut, nylon, e-PTFE. Animals were sacrificed at 3 days, 1, 2 and 4 weeks after implantation of various nonresorbable and resorbable suture materials. Specimens were prepared with Hematoxylin-Eosin stain for light microscopic evaluation. The results of this study were as follows: 1. Resorption : The resorption of plain gut was showed at 1 week after implantation, was lost their structure and almost resorbed at 4 weeks. The resorption of polyglactin 910 was started at 2 weeks and slowly absorbed untill 4 weeks. 2. Tissue response : Plain gut showed persistent and severe inflammatory reactions from 3 days to 4 weeks. Polyglactin 910, e-PTFE and nylon showed mild inflammatory reactions. Suture material should be biocompatible and be able to be functioned until tissue tensile strength reaches maximum level. In this study, polyglactin 910, nylon and e-PTFE are considered to be proper suture materials for periodontal surgery.
    The Korean Journal of periodontology. 01/2002; 21:113-127.