Jing Zhao

Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (4)18.05 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress T-cell proliferation, especially after activation with inflammatory cytokines. We compared the dynamic action of unprimed and interferon (IFN)-γ plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-pretreated human bone marrow-derived MSCs on resting or activated T cells. MSCs were co-cultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at high MSC-to-PBMC ratios in the absence or presence of concomitant CD3/CD28-induced T-cell activation. The kinetic effects of MSCs on cytokine production and T-cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed. Unprimed MSCs increased the early production of IFN-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 by CD3/CD28-activated PBMCs before suppressing T-cell proliferation. In non-activated PBMC co-cultures, low levels of IL-2 and IL-10 synthesis were observed with MSCs in addition to low levels of CD69 expression by T cells and no T-cell proliferation. MSCs also decreased apoptosis in resting and activated T cells and inhibited the transition of these cells into the sub-G0/G1 and the S phases. With inhibition of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, MSCs increased CD3/CD28-induced T-cell proliferation. After priming with IFN-γ plus TNF-α, MSCs were less potent at increasing cytokine production by CD3/CD28-activated PBMCs and more effective at inhibiting T-cell proliferation but had preserved anti-apoptotic functions. Unprimed MSCs induce a transient increase in IFN-γ and IL-2 synthesis by activated T cells. Pre-treatment of MSCs with IFN-γ plus TNF-α may increase their effectiveness and safety in vivo.
    Cytotherapy 02/2014; 16(2):191-202. · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cystinosis is a rare disease caused by homozygous mutations of the CTNS gene, encoding a cystine efflux channel in the lysosomal membrane. In Ctns knockout mice, the pathologic intralysosomal accumulation of cystine that drives progressive organ damage can be reversed by infusion of wildtype bone marrow-derived stem cells, but the mechanism involved is unclear since the exogeneous stem cells are rarely integrated into renal tubules. Here we show that human mesenchymal stem cells, from amniotic fluid or bone marrow, reduce pathologic cystine accumulation in co-cultured CTNS mutant fibroblasts or proximal tubular cells from cystinosis patients. This paracrine effect is associated with release into the culture medium of stem cell microvesicles (100-400 nm diameter) containing wildtype cystinosin protein and CTNS mRNA. Isolated stem cell microvesicles reduce target cell cystine accumulation in a dose-dependent, Annexin V-sensitive manner. Microvesicles from stem cells expressing CTNS(Red) transfer tagged CTNS protein to the lysosome/endosome compartment of cystinotic fibroblasts. Our observations suggest that exogenous stem cells may reprogram the biology of mutant tissues by direct microvesicle transfer of membrane-associated wildtype molecules.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(8):e42840. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising for regenerative medicine applications, such as for renoprotection and repair in acute kidney injury (AKI). Erythropoietin (Epo) can also exert cytoprotective effects on various tissues including the kidney. We hypothesized that MSCs gene-enhanced to secrete Epo may produce a significant beneficial effect in AKI. Mouse Epo-secreting MSCs were generated, tested in vitro, and then implanted by intraperitoneal injection in allogeneic mice previously administered cisplatin to induce AKI. Epo-MSCs significantly improved survival of implanted mice as compared to controls (67% survival versus 33% with Vehicle only). Also, Epo-MSCs led to significantly better kidney function as shown by lower levels of blood urea nitrogen (72 ± 9.5 mg/dl versus 131 ± 9.20 mg/dl) and creatinine (74 ± 17 µmol/l versus 148±19.4 µmol/l). Recipient mice also showed significantly decreased amylase and alanine aminotransferase blood concentrations. Kidney sections revealed significantly less apoptotic cells and more proliferating cells. Furthermore, PCR revealed the presence of implanted cells in recipient kidneys, with Epo-MSCs leading to significantly increased expression of Epo and of phosphorylated-Akt (Ser473) (P-Akt) in these kidneys. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that Epo gene-enhanced MSCs exert significant tissue protective effects in allogeneic mice with AKI, and supports the potential use of gene-enhanced cells as universal donors in acute injury.
    Molecular Therapy 08/2011; 19(11):2072-83. · 7.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute kidney injury (AKI) can occur from the toxic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have demonstrated wide therapeutic potential often due to beneficial factors they secrete. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate in vitro the effect of human MSCs (hMSCs) secretome on cisplatin-treated human kidney cells, and in vivo the consequence of hMSCs intraperitoneal (ip) implantation in mice with AKI. Our results revealed that hMSCs-conditioned media improved survival of HK-2 human proximal tubular cells exposed to cisplatin in vitro. This enhanced survival was linked to increased expression of phosphorylated Akt (Ser473) and was reduced by a VEGF-neutralizing antibody. In vivo testing of these hMSCs established that ip administration in NOD-SCID mice decreased cisplatin-induced kidney function impairment, as demonstrated by lower blood urea nitrogen levels and higher survival. In addition, blood phosphorous and amylase levels were also significantly decreased. Moreover, hMSCs reduced the plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Immunohistochemical examination of kidneys showed less apoptotic and more proliferating cells. Furthermore, PCR indicated the presence of hMSCs in mouse kidneys, which also showed enhanced expression of phosphorylated Akt. In conclusion, our study reveals that hMSCs can exert prosurvival effects on renal cells in vitro and in vivo, suggests a paracrine contribution for kidney protective abilities of hMSCs delivered ip, and supports their clinical potential in AKI.
    AJP Renal Physiology 12/2010; 299(6):F1288-98. · 4.42 Impact Factor