Jason E Hsu

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States

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Publications (26)47.96 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Glenoid bone deficiency and eccentric posterior wear are difficult problems faced by shoulder arthroplasty surgeons. Numerous options and techniques exist for addressing these issues. Hemiarthroplasty with concentric glenoid reaming may be a viable alternative in motivated patients in whom glenoid component failure is a concern. Total shoulder arthroplasty has been shown to provide durable pain relief and excellent function in patients, and numerous methods and techniques can assist in addressing bone loss and eccentric wear. However, the ideal amount of version correction in cases of severe retroversion has not yet been established. Asymmetric reaming is a commonly used technique to address glenoid version, but correction of severe retroversion may compromise bone stock and component fixation. Bone grafting is a technically demanding alternative for uncontained defects and has mixed clinical results. Specialized glenoid implants with posterior augmentation have been created to assist the surgeon in correcting glenoid version without compromising bone stock, but clinical data on these implants are still pending. Custom implants or instruments based on each patient's unique glenoid anatomy may hold promise. In elderly, sedentary patients in whom bone stock and soft-tissue balance are concerns, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty may be less technically demanding while still providing satisfactory pain relief and functional improvements.
    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.] 06/2013; · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a novel technique of fractional myotendinous lengthening of the elbow flexors in patients with volitional motor control and spastic elbow flexion deformities after brain injury. METHODS: A retrospective review of 42 consecutive patients with spastic elbow flexion deformities and upper motor neuron (UMN) syndrome was performed. Each patient had volitional motor control but limited elbow extension and underwent myotendinous lengthening of the elbow flexor muscles. Outcome measures included pre and post-operative active and passive arc of motion, Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) of spasticity, and complications. RESULTS: There were 26 men and 16 women. The etiologies of UMN syndrome were stroke (30 patients), traumatic brain injury (11 patients), and cerebral palsy (1 patient). Average duration between injury and surgery was 6.6 years. At an average follow-up of 14 months, improvements were noted in active extension (42° to 20°; P < .001). In addition, active arc of motion increased from 77° (range of motion [ROM]: 42° to 119°) to 113° (ROM: 20° to 133°) (P < .001) and passive arc of motion increased from 103° (ROM: 24°-127°) to 131° (ROM: 8°-139°) (P < .001). Significant improvement in MAS was also noted after surgery (2.7 to 1.9; P < .001). Superficial wound dehiscence occurred in 2 patients and was successfully treated nonoperatively. CONCLUSION: In patients with spastic elbow flexion deformities and active motor control, fractional myotendinous lengthening of the elbow flexors safely improves active extension and the overall arc of motion while affording immediate postoperative elbow motion.
    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.] 01/2013; · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: More than one-quarter of Americans have hypercholesterolemia and/or are being treated with cholesterol-lowering medications. Given the systemic nature of hypercholesterolemia and remaining questions regarding its effect on tendons at a local level, we sought to assess the utility of small versus large animal model systems for translational studies by exploring the effect of hypercholesterolemia on supraspinatus tendon elastic mechanical properties in mice, rats, and monkeys. We hypothesized that stiffness and elastic modulus would be increased in tendons across species due to hypercholesterolemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Supraspinatus tendons from normal (control) and high-cholesterol (HC) mice, rats, and monkeys were used in this study. After dissection, tendons were geometrically measured and tensile tested with tissue strain measured optically. RESULTS: Overall, HC animals had significantly altered plasma lipid profiles. Biomechanical testing showed a significant increase in stiffness compared with control in HC mice and rats, as well as a nonsignificant trend for HC monkeys. Elastic modulus was also significantly increased in HC mice and monkeys, with HC rats showing a trend. CONCLUSIONS: The consistency of our findings across species and between small and large animals, combined with the fact that the aged mice were exposed to lifelong hypercholesterolemia (compared with rats and nonhuman primates, which were fed HC diets), suggests that these increased properties may be inherent to the effect of hypercholesterolemia on supraspinatus tendon rather than due to an effect of cumulative exposure time to the effects of HC. Further investigation is needed to confirm this concept.
    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.] 09/2012; · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is technically difficult to obtain high-quality, postoperative shoulder radiographs immediately after surgery. Further, poor-quality radiographs may be unlikely to change clinical practice or improve patient outcomes. We therefore questioned the value of routine postoperative radiographs after shoulder arthroplasty. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We asked whether (1) postanesthesia care unit (PACU) radiographs can reasonably serve as a baseline for future studies; and (2) routine PACU radiographs change clinical care. (3) We also determined the charges associated with routine PACU radiographs and formal radiographic interpretation of these images. METHODS: We retrospectively compared the radiographs of 283 patients who had shoulder arthroplasties (Group 1) who underwent PACU radiographs with those of 241 patients (Group 2) who had their first postoperative radiographs at a later date. Radiographs were compared for quality, ability to serve as a baseline, and their influence on clinical course. Orthopaedic evaluation of each radiograph and the radiographic report were compared and charges were analyzed. RESULTS: All images in Group 1 were single-view radiographs (88% internal rotation), most were underpenetrated (71%); no images changed postoperative management or were considered adequate to serve as a baseline. Group 2 radiographs were multiview radiographs, and 83% were deemed adequate to serve as baseline radiographs. Radiographic interpretation of immediate postoperative radiographs did not change the clinical course or treatment. The charges billed from radiographic evaluation in this study were $64,524 for Group 1. CONCLUSIONS: Routine PACU radiographs, in the absence of a specific indication, may result in poor-quality images. Elimination of these radiographs and radiographic interpretation after shoulder arthroplasty may reduce charges without changing clinical care. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, diagnostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 08/2012; · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • Jason E Hsu, Stephen Y Liu, Gwo-Chin Lee
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of our study was to determine if authors with conflicts of interest are less likely to report negative study outcomes in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty. We performed a systematic review of 3 major orthopedic journals for articles related to metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty over 12 years. A total of 64 studies reported clinical outcomes and were included. Reviewers assigned a positive, neutral, or negative label. Each study was noted for the presence of absence of a financial conflict. There was a significant trend from positive to negative study outcomes over time (P = .015). A similar negative trend was seen in studies written by authors with financial disclosures (P = .021). Authors with financial conflicts have contributed to the increase in negative outcomes reported in the literature.
    The Journal of arthroplasty 06/2012; 27(8 Suppl):41-5.e1. · 1.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mouse has proven to be an advantageous animal model system in basic science research focused on aiding in development and evaluation of potential treatments; however, the small size of mouse tendons makes consistent and reproducible injury models and subsequent biomechanical evaluation challenging for studying tendon healing. In this study, we investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of multiple mouse tendon injury models. Our hypothesis was that incisional (using a blade) and excisional (using a biopsy punch) injuries would result in consistent differences in tendon material properties. At 16 weeks of age, 17 C57BL/6 mice underwent surgery to create defects in the flexor digitorum longus, Achilles, or patellar tendon. Each animal received 1-2 full-thickness, central-width incisional or excisional injuries per limb; at least one tendon per limb remained uninjured. The injuries were distributed such that each tendon type had comparable numbers of uninjured, incisionally injured, and excisionally injured specimens. Three weeks after injury, all animals were euthanized and tendons were harvested for mechanical testing. As hypothesized, differences were detected for all three different tendon types at three weeks post-injury. While all models created injuries that produced predictable outcomes, the patellar tendon model was the most consistent in terms of number and size of significant differences in injured tendons compared to native properties, as well as in the overall variance in the data. This finding provides support for its use in fundamental tendon healing studies; however, future work may use any of these models, based on their appropriateness for the specific question under study.
    Journal of biomechanics 03/2012; 45(8):1550-3. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: During neonatal development, tendons undergo a well-orchestrated process whereby extensive structural and compositional changes occur in synchrony to produce a normal tissue. Conversely, during the repair response to injury, structural and compositional changes occur, but a mechanically inferior tendon is produced. As a result, developmental processes have been postulated as a potential paradigm through which improved adult tissue healing may occur. By examining injury at distinctly different stages of development, vital information can be obtained into the structure-function relationships in tendon. The mouse is an intriguing developmental model due to the availability of assays and genetically altered animals. However, it has not previously been used for mechanical analysis of healing tendon due to the small size and fragile nature of neonatal tendons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the differential healing response in tendon at two distinct stages of development through mechanical, compositional, and structural properties. To accomplish this, a new in vivo surgical model and mechanical analysis method for the neonatal mouse Achilles tendons were developed. We demonstrated that injury during early development has an accelerated healing response when compared to injury during late development. This accelerated healing model can be used in future mechanistic studies to elucidate the method for improved adult tendon healing.
    Journal of Orthopaedic Research 03/2012; 30(3):448-56. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The evidence supporting continued use of shelf acetabuloplasty in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is not well-defined, and there is controversy regarding the long-term benefits related to clinical and functional improvement. Our goals were to determine whether shelf arthroplasty for LCPD (1) prevents the onset of early osteoarthritis; (2) improves pain, ROM, activity, and functional outcomes; (3) maintains or improves femoral head containment, sphericity, and congruency; (4) changes the acetabular index; and (5) is associated with a low rate of complications. We performed a systematic review of the medical literature from 1966 to 2009 using the search terms Perthes, shelf procedure, and acetabuloplasty. We excluded reports using multiple/combined treatment methods and those not clearly stratifying outcomes. Thirteen studies met the criteria. There were no Level I studies, one Level II prognostic study, five Level III therapeutic studies, and seven Level IV studies. Mean followup ranged from 2.6 to 17.9 years. Only one study reported progression to early osteoarthritis in one patient. We found no evidence for improvement in ROM and continued pain relief at long-term followup. Mean decrease in lateral subluxation ratio was 13% to 30%, demonstrating an improvement in femoral head containment. Mean acetabular cover percentage improved 16% to 38%, and mean acetabular and center-edge angles improved 4° to 14° and 8° to 33°, respectively. There were no reports of any major complications after the procedure. While radiographic measurements indicate improved coverage of the femoral head after shelf acetabuloplasty for LCPD, available evidence does not document the procedure prevents early onset of osteoarthritis or improves long-term function.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 12/2011; 470(9):2421-30. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent technologic advances in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have focused on improving the longevity and wear characteristics of bearing surfaces that can withstand the high demands of younger and more active patients. Recent reports of early failures of metal-on-metal THA have introduced doubts to its ability to be a viable long-term hard-on-hard bearing surface for hip arthroplasty. Like metal-on-metal, ceramic-on-ceramic (COC) bearing surfaces have excellent in vitro wear characteristics, but there is little information about their long-term track record in vivo, particularly in those patients who are younger and more active. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of COC THA in active patients younger than 50 years of age. We retrospectively reviewed 82 consecutive THAs in 64 patients performed by a single surgeon from 1997 to 2000. There were 42 men and 22 women with an average age of 38.6 years. Of the 82 THAs, 39 were performed for avascular necrosis of the hip, 30 for osteoarthritis, 8 for developmental dysplasia, and 5 for inflammatory or posttraumatic arthritis. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Harris hip score, and serial radiographs were evaluated for signs of component loosening. The mean follow-up period was 10.1 (range, 10.0-12.3) years. One patient died, and another was lost to follow-up. The mean Harris hip score was 89.8. There were no implants with subsidence or circumferential radiolucent lines. Two patients required revision surgery of their THA for a ceramic liner fracture. One patient complained of squeaking that required revision. There were no cases of revision for ceramic head fracture, instability, or aseptic loosening. At a minimum 10-year follow-up, the survivorship of the COC THA was 96.3%. Modern COC THA in active patients younger than 50 years of age is durable at a minimum 10-year follow-up; however, patients should be advised of the small chance of squeaking and ceramic fracture.
    Seminars in Arthroplasty 12/2011; 22(4):229–233.
  • Jason E. Hsu, Nick Pappas, Gwo-Chin Lee
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    ABSTRACT: Comminuted periarticular fractures about the knee joint can be challenging to treat. In a select group of patients with pre-existing knee arthritis, poor bone quality, or a need for immediate weight-bearing, the benefits of primary total knee replacement and simultaneous fracture fixation can outweigh the risks. We outline a systematic approach following sound principles of arthroplasty and fracture fixation to reconstruct periarticular fractures about the knee. By using these principles, acute total knee arthroplasty can treat both the fracture and the arthritic knee joint and result in good clinical outcomes with low complication rates.
    Current Orthopaedic Practice 10/2011; 22(6):567–572.
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigates factors associated with failure and reoperation after glenoid labrum repair. We studied a nonconcurrent cohort of consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopic superior labrum repair at a single institution by 2 fellowship-trained surgeons over a 10-year period. There were 348 patients included in this study with a mean age of 33.4 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 32.1 to 35.9) and a mean clinical follow-up of 12.3 months (95% CI, 10.9 to 13.8). The overall reoperation rate was 6.3%, with a revision labrum repair rate of 4.3%. Subsequent surgery and failure after arthroscopic labrum repair were significantly correlated with Workers' Compensation claims (odds ratio [OR], 4.6; P < .001; 95% CI, 1.8 to 11.7), the use of tobacco (OR, 12.0; P = .03; 95% CI, 1.2 to 114.9), and the use of absorbable poly-L/D-lactic acid (PLDLA) anchors (100% correlation, P < .001). The OR for having repeat surgery was 12.7 (95% CI, 4.9 to 32.9; P < .001) with poly-96L/4D-lactic acid (Mini-Revo; Linvatec, Largo, FL) and also increased with the use of poly-70L/30D-lactic acid (Bio-Fastak and Bio-Suturetak; Arthrex, Naples, FL) anchor material (P = .04) after removal of the patients exposed to poly-96L/4D-lactic acid anchors. The rates of repeat surgery with PLDLA anchors from Linvatec and PLDLA anchors from Arthrex were 24% and 4%, respectively. None of the patients treated with nonabsorbable suture anchors (polyether ether ketone or metallic) returned to the operating room (P < .001). After we controlled for associated factors in a multivariate analysis, the use of absorbable anchors, in particular poly-96L/4D-lactic acid anchors (OR, 14.7; P < .001), and having a work-related injury (OR, 8.1; P < .001) remained independent factors associated with both repeat surgery and revision superior labrum repair. Bioabsorbable PLDLA anchor material led to significantly more SLAP repair failures and reoperations compared with nonabsorbable suture anchors. Our recommendation is that glenoid labrum repairs be performed with nondegradable material and, specifically, that the use of anchors composed of PLDLA material should be avoided.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 09/2011; 27(10):1335-40. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Femur fractures are common long-bone injuries in school-aged children (6-12 years). Among the various acceptable treatment options, elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has gained popularity over recent years although the level of evidence for ESIN is low. This study was a systematic review of the literature to examine the outcomes and complications of ESIN in school-aged children and to critically evaluate the quality of the available literature. Although most complications were minor, some series report complication rates of more than 50%. Union rates are high. Malunion or mechanical axis malalignment, on the other hand, is common, and leg length discrepancy and overgrowth are also not unusual. Symptomatic implants are common, particularly if the distal ends of the nail are left long and prominent. Refracture was noted to be uncommon in this population. ESIN is a well-accepted and reliable option for treatment of femur fractures in school-aged children. Advantages are decreased length of hospital stay, early return to function, and high union rates. Care must be taken to obtain and maintain reduction, and caution is advised in older and heavier children.
    Journal of pediatric orthopaedics. Part B / European Paediatric Orthopaedic Society, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America 09/2011; 20(5):303-8. · 0.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biceps tendon pathology is common with rotator cuff tears. The mechanisms for biceps changes, and therefore its optimal treatment, are unknown. Our objective was to determine the effect of rotator cuff tears on regional biceps tendon pathology. We hypothesized that histologic and compositional changes would appear before organizational changes, both would appear before mechanical changes, and changes would begin at the tendon's insertion site. Detachment of supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons or sham surgery was done in 65 Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were euthanized at 1, 4, or 8 weeks for regional measurements of histologic, compositional, organizational (1, 4 and 8 weeks), or mechanical properties (4 and 8 weeks only). One week after tendon detachments, decreased organization and more rounded cell shape were found in the intra-articular space of the biceps tendon. Aggrecan expression was increased along the entire length of the tendon, whereas all other compositional changes were only at the tendon's proximal insertion into bone. With time, this disorganization and more rounded cell shape extended the length of the tendon. Organizational and cell shape changes also preceded detrimental mechanical changes: decreased modulus in the intra-articular space was found after 8 weeks. Results support a degenerative component to pathology in the biceps tendon. In addition, changes resembling a tendon exposed to compressive loading occurring first in the intra-articular space indicate that the biceps tendon plays an increased role as a load-bearing structure against the humeral head in the presence of rotator cuff tears.
    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.] 08/2011; 21(7):873-81. · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mobility of the glenohumeral joint is facilitated through the complex interplay of soft tissue and osseous anatomy. Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization is commonly used in the surgical management of shoulder instability. However, the management of the unstable shoulder associated with bony defects (glenoid, humeral, or combined) can be challenging. Adequate recognition of bony defects is paramount to successful treatment and entails a careful history, clinical examination, and advanced radiographic imaging. Nonoperative methods of treatment are often insufficient for treating patients with large bony defects. Bony procedures, as opposed to soft procedures, may yield better outcomes in this patient population. However, respective surgical techniques used to address these defects are technically challenging with a significant learning curve and may lead to significant morbidity. This represents a paradigm shift in treatment and replaces the old paradigm of "open vs arthroscopic" instability surgery.
    Orthopedics 07/2011; 34(7):538-44; quiz 545-6. · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of biceps tendon changes after rotator cuff tears. We hypothesized that increased loading on the biceps tendon after rotator cuff tears will result in further detrimental changes whereas decreased loading will result in increased organization and more normal tendon composition. In addition, we hypothesized that changes with altered loading will begin at the proximal insertion into bone and progress along the tendon length at later time points. Supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon detachments in rats were followed by various loading protocols at various time points. Regional changes in cellularity, cell shape, collagen organization, and matrix proteins of the long head of the biceps tendon were determined by histologic measures and immunohistochemistry. Increased loading after detachments resulted in more disorganized collagen after only 1 week and compositional changes by 4 weeks. By 8 weeks, decreased loading resulted in increased organization, decreased cellularity, a more elongated cell shape, and more normal tendon composition. Organizational changes with increased loading began in the intra-articular space and progressed along the tendon length with time. Combined with previous findings of decreased mechanics with increased loading, these results show that increased compressive loading away from the proximal insertion into bone is a mechanism for biceps tendon pathology in the presence of rotator cuff tears. The striking improvements with decreased loading further support increased loading as a mechanism for biceps tendon pathology because removal of this load led to improvements in tendon histology, organization, and composition.
    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.] 03/2011; 20(5):698-707. · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An abstract is unavailable. This article is available as HTML full text and PDF.
    Current Orthopaedic Practice 02/2011; 22(2):208–210.
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    ABSTRACT: The rotator cuff musculature imparts dynamic stability to the glenohumeral joint. In particular, the balance between the subscapularis anteriorly and the infraspinatus posteriorly, often referred to as the rotator cuff "force couple," is critical for concavity compression and concentric rotation of the humeral head. Restoration of this anterior-posterior force balance after chronic, massive rotator cuff tears may allow for deltoid compensation, but no in vivo studies have quantitatively demonstrated an improvement in shoulder function. Our goal was to determine if restoring this balance of forces improves shoulder function after two-tendon rotator cuff tears in a rat model. Forty-eight rats underwent detachment of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus. After four weeks, rats were randomly assigned to three groups: no repair, infraspinatus repair, and two-tendon repair. Quantitative ambulatory measures including medial/lateral forces, braking, propulsion, and step width were significantly different between the infraspinatus and no repair group and similar between the infraspinatus and two-tendon repair groups at almost all time points. These results suggest that repairing the infraspinatus back to its insertion site without repair of the supraspinatus can improve shoulder function to a level similar to repairing both the infraspinatus and supraspinatus tendons. Clinically, a partial repair of the posterior cuff after a two-tendon tear may be sufficient to restore adequate function. An in vivo model system for two-tendon repair of massive rotator cuff tears is presented.
    Journal of Orthopaedic Research 02/2011; 29(7):1028-33. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Damage to the biceps tendon is often seen in conjunction with rotator cuff tears. However, controversy exists regarding its role in the shoulder and its optimal treatment. A previous study determined that biceps tendons were detrimentally affected in the presence of rotator cuff tears in the rat model and this damage worsened over time. However, whether this damage progresses at later time points to provide a chronic model is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the changes in the biceps tendon in the presence of a cuff tear over time. Our hypothesis was that histological, compositional, organizational, and mechanical properties would worsen with time. We detached the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons of 48 rats and evaluated these properties at 1, 4, 8, and 16 weeks postdetachment. Properties worsened through 8 weeks, but improved between 8 and 16 weeks. We therefore conclude that biceps tendon changes in this model are not truly chronic. Additionally, it has been shown that infraspinatus properties in this model return to normal by 16 weeks, when biceps properties improve, indicating that earlier repair of one or more of the rotator cuff tendons may lead to resolved pathology of the long head of the biceps tendon.
    Journal of Orthopaedic Research 01/2011; 29(6):874-9. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis is a clinical diagnosis based on history and physical examination. Afflicted patients exhibit active and passive loss of motion in all planes and a positive capsular stretch sign. The effect of adhesive capsulitis on acromioclavicular biomechanics leading to tenderness has not been documented in the literature. This study reports on the incidence of acromioclavicular tenderness in the presence of adhesive capsulitis. Furthermore, we note the natural history of such acromioclavicular joint pain in relation to that of adhesive capsulitis. Over a 2-year period (2005-2007), 84 patients undergoing initial evaluation for adhesive capsulitis were prospectively examined with the use of validated outcome measures and physical examination. Acromioclavicular joint tenderness results were compared and analyzed on initial evaluation and final follow-up of at least 1 year. Forty-eight patients (57%) with adhesive capsulitis had acromioclavicular joint pain on examination. At final follow-up, as range of motion improved, a significant increase in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons/Penn shoulder score and decrease in number of patients with acromioclavicular pain was noted with only 6 patients with residual pain (P<.05). In the presence of adhesive capsulitis, there is not only compensatory scapulothoracic motion but also acromioclavicular motion. This often results in transient symptoms at the acromioclavicular joint, which abate as the frozen shoulder resolves and glenohumeral motion improves. This is important to recognize to avoid unnecessary invasive treatment of the acromioclavicular joint when the patient presents with adhesive capsulitis.
    Orthopedics 01/2011; 34(9):e556-60. · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Core decompression and grafting has been shown to relieve pain and possibly prevent disease progression in patients with symptomatic osteonecrosis (ON) of the hip. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding the management of the asymptomatic hip with femoral head ON. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of core decompression in the asymptomatic hip with ON. We prospectively followed 37 consecutive patients with MRI confirmed ON of the hips that underwent simultaneous bilateral core decompression and bone grafting. Prior to surgery, only one of the hips was symptomatic, and the main indication for surgical decompression of the asymptomatic side was to prevent disease progression. No hip on the asymptomatic side was staged greater than Steinberg IIB classification. Serial radiographs were followed for evidence of disease progression. Six patients were lost to follow-up prior to two years. The remaining 31 patients were followed for an average of 32.6 months. There were 20 men and 11 women with an average age of 40.6 years. Ten patients with asymptomatic hips at the time of surgical decompression had disease progression requiring THA. The mean time to arthroplasty in this group was 15.1 months. Meanwhile, 13 symptomatic hips at the initial surgery progressed to THA at an average of 12.9 months following core decompression. The proportion of hips requiring conversion to THA was similar between the two groups (p=0.30), and the rate of progression to THA was not significantly faster compared to patients with symptomatic hips who subsequently required THA (p=0.18). Core decompression for asymptomatic ON of the femoral head is unpredictable. Based on our results, asymptomatic ON lesions particularly in the setting of bilateral disease should be closely observed and surgery reserved for when symptoms arise.
    Hip international: the journal of clinical and experimental research on hip pathology and therapy 01/2011; 21(6):672-7. · 0.34 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

52 Citations
476 Downloads
1k Views
47.96 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2012
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
  • 2010–2011
    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States