Janet Royalty

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Michigan, United States

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Publications (38)126.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To provide information on the sources of data for estimating low-income, uninsured populations. To recommend uses of these data sources. To demonstrate the application of these data sources in the public health field, using the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program as an example. We describe U.S. Census Bureau data sources for identifying low-income, uninsured populations using two population surveys: the Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS ASEC) and the American Community Survey (ACS), and using one model-based estimation program, the Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE). We provide recommendations for use of these data sources, and we use CPS ASEC and SAHIE to estimate the percent of U.S. women eligible for the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). CPS ASEC, ACS, and SAHIE are produced by the U.S. Census Bureau, and they are reliable sources for estimates of the low-income, uninsured populations in the USA. Key characteristics of these three data sources were presented to highlight the strengths of each to meet the needs of various programs at national and local levels. Recommendations are made on the use of the data sources. Based on these three data sources, estimates of NBCCEDP eligibility showed substantial variation over time at the national and state levels, and across states and counties. Publicly funded programs that are directed toward low-income, uninsured individuals require information on their eligible populations to make decisions about program policy and resource allocation, and to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the programs. The U.S. Census Bureau produces three data sources (CPS ASEC, ACS, and SAHIE) for these estimates. The percent of U.S. women eligible for NBCCEDP varies over time and across states and counties. The data sources for these estimates are changing in order to measure key dimensions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and can provide helpful information for assessing the legislation's impact.
    Cancer Causes and Control 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0571-y · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is substantial variation across the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) grantees in terms of the proportion of the eligible population served by the grantees each year (hereafter referred to as the screening proportion). In this paper, we assess program- and state-level factors to better understand the reason for this variation in breast and cervical cancer screening proportions across the NBCCEDP grantees. We constructed a longitudinal data set, consisting of data from NBCCEDP grantees for each of the three study years (program-years 2006-2007, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010). We performed multivariate analysis to explain the variation in breast and cervical cancer screening proportions across the grantees. The program-level factors studied were the total federal funds received, average cost of screening women by grantee, and the overall organizational structure. The state-level variables included were urban versus rural mix, access to care, and the size of the eligible population. Of the 48 grantees included in the study, those that serve larger populations, as measured by the size of the population and the percentage of women eligible for services, had lower screening proportions. Higher average cost of service delivery was also associated with lower screening proportions. In addition, grantees whose populations were more concentrated in urban areas had lower screening proportions. Overall, the average cost of screening, the overall size of the population eligible, and the concentration of population in urban areas all had a negative relationship to the proportion of eligible women screened by NBCCEDP grantees.
    Cancer Causes and Control 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0569-5 · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) enrolls asymptomatic women for cancer screening and symptomatic women for diagnostic services. This study describes the results of mammograms provided by the NBCCEDP, by examination indication (screening or diagnostic), and by age group. For the first NBCCEDP-funded mammogram received during 2009-2012, we calculated age-specific percentages of abnormal findings, rates of follow-up testing, and invasive and in situ breast cancer diagnoses per 1,000 mammograms. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds for each of these outcomes by examination indication. The NBCCEDP provided 941,649 screening, 175,310 diagnostic, and 30,434 unknown indication mammograms to 1,147,393 women. The percentage with abnormal mammograms was higher for diagnostic mammograms (40.1 %) than for screening mammograms (15.5 %). Compared with women aged 40-49 years, fewer women aged 50-64 years had abnormal results for screening (13.7 vs. 19.7 %) and diagnostic mammograms (37.7 vs. 42.7 %). Follow-up rates per 1,000 mammograms were lower among women aged 50-64 compared to those aged 40-49 (screening: 143.9 vs. 207.5; diagnostic: 645.3 vs. 760.9); biopsy rates exhibited a similar pattern (screening: 24.1 vs. 32.9; diagnostic: 167.7 vs. 169.7). For screening mammograms, older women had more cancers detected than younger women (invasive: 3.6 vs. 2.2; in situ: 2.3 vs. 2.0). Similarly, for diagnostic mammograms, cancer detection was higher for older women (invasive: 67.8 vs. 36.6; in situ: 17.4 vs. 11.1). Abnormal mammograms and diagnostic follow-up procedures were less frequent in women aged 50-64 years compared to women aged 40-49 years, while breast cancer detection was higher, regardless of indication for the mammogram. Some of these differences between age groups were greater for screening mammograms than for diagnostic mammograms. Cancer detection rates were higher for diagnostic mammograms compared with screening mammograms. These findings support the NBCCEDP's priority of serving women aged 50-64 years and providing both screening and diagnostic mammograms.
    Cancer Causes and Control 03/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0567-7 · 2.96 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Causes and Control 03/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0561-0 · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Reflex human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is the preferred triage option for most women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US). This study was conducted to describe follow-up results of women with ASC-US Pap test results in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), focusing on HPV test use. We examined the follow-up of 45,049 women in the NBCCEDP with ASC-US Pap tests during 2009-2011. Data on demographic characteristics, diagnostic procedures, and clinical outcomes were analyzed. NBCCEDP providers diagnosed 45,049 women (4.5 % of all Pap tests) with an ASC-US result. Of those, 28,271 (62.8 %) were followed with an HPV test, 3,883 (8.6 %) with a repeat Pap test, 6,592 (14.6 %) with colposcopy, and 6,303 were lost to follow-up (14.0 %). Women aged 40 and older were followed more often with an HPV test. White, black, and Asian/Pacific Islander women were followed more often with an HPV test after an ASC-US Pap compared to Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women. Among women with a positive HPV test on follow-up, almost 90 % continued with colposcopy as recommended. AI/AN women had the highest rates of HPV positivity (55.2 %) and of no follow-up (25.0 %). This is the first analysis describing follow-up of ASC-US Pap test results in the NBCCEDP, providing a window into current management of ASC-US results. Findings raise concerns about persistent disparities among AI/AN women. During 2009-2011, nearly two-thirds of women with an ASC-US Pap test result were followed with an HPV reflex test.
    Cancer Causes and Control 03/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0549-9 · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the number and proportion of eligible women receiving mammograms funded by the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). Low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women aged 40-64 are eligible for mammography screening through the NBCCEDP. We used data from the NBCCEDP, the Current Population Survey, and Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to describe the number and proportion of women screened by the NBCCEDP and overall. In 2011 and 2012, the NBCCEDP screened 549,043 women aged 40-64, an estimated 10.6 % (90 % confidence interval [CI] 10.4-10.9 %) of the eligible population. We estimate that 30.6 % (90 % CI 26.4-34.8 %) of eligible women aged 40-64 were screened outside the NBCCEDP, and 58.8 % (90 % CI 54.6-63.0 %) were not screened. The proportion of eligible women screened by the NBCCEDP varied across states, with an estimated range of 3.2 % (90 % CI 2.9-3.5 %) to 52.8 % (90 % CI 36.1-69.6 %) and a median of 13.7 % (90 % CI 11.0-16.4 %). The estimated proportion of eligible women aged 40-64 who received mammograms through the NBCCEDP was relatively constant over time, 11.1 % (90 % CI 10.2-11.9 %) in 1998-1999 and 10.6 % (90 % CI 10.4-11.9 %) in 2011-2012 (p = 0.23), even as the number of women screened increased from 343,692 to 549,043. Although the NBCCEDP provided screening services to over a half million low-income uninsured women for mammography, it served a small percentage of those eligible. The majority of low-income, uninsured women were not screened.
    Cancer Causes and Control 03/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0553-0 · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the proportional distribution of early- and late-stage breast cancers diagnosed in years 2004-2009 among women enrolled in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) and to compare this distribution to that of geographically comparable non-enrolled women diagnosed with breast cancer. Using data from the National Program of Cancer Registries, we compared the demographic characteristics and cancer stage distribution of women enrollees and non-enrollees by use of conditional logistic regression using the odds ratio as a measure of association. NBCCEDP enrollees were slightly younger and more likely to identify as African-American, API and AIAN than were non-enrollees. The proportion of late-stage breast cancer (regional and distant) decreased slightly over the study period. NBCCEDP enrollees generally were diagnosed at a later stage of breast cancer than were those not enrolled in the NBCCEDP. The NBCCEDP has been effective in achieving its goal of enrolling racial and ethnic populations; however, enrollees had a poorer stage distribution of breast cancer than did non-enrollees underscoring the need to expand breast cancer control efforts among low-income, underserved populations.
    Cancer Causes and Control 03/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0548-x · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effectiveness of a policy supporting early detection and prevention of cervical cancer among low-income and uninsured women by comparing women who reported never or rarely being screened (last screen >5 years) to those who reported screening in the past ≤5 years. We analyzed data from 1,485,251 women who received their first Pap test in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) from July 2002 through June 2012. Of these, 461,893 women (31 %) reported being never or rarely screened and 1,023,358 (69 %) reported being screened in the past 5 years. Demographic (age, race/ethnicity, residence, and region) and clinic (cytologic and histologic results) characteristics were examined for the two groups. Women who were aged ≥50 years, Asian and Pacific Islander, American Indian or Alaska Native, multiracial, living in non-metro areas, or living in the South or a territory were more likely to report being never or rarely screened. The percentage of abnormal Pap tests and the rate of precancer and cancer (combined) was higher in the never or rarely screened group compared with the screened group (abnormal percentage: 2.9 vs 2.6 %, p value < 0.01; rate of precancer and cancer: 6.9 vs 3.7 per 1,000 women, p value < 0.01). The priority of reaching never or rarely screened women should continue since those women who entered the NBCCEDP not adequately screened had a greater prevalence of high-grade histological lesions and invasive cervical cancers at later stages than women screened more recently.
    Cancer Causes and Control 03/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0542-3 · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess cancers diagnosed and the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis among low-income, under-insured, or uninsured women who received services through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). Using the NBCCEDP database, we examined the number and percent of women diagnosed during 2009-2011 with in situ breast cancer, invasive breast cancer, and invasive cervical cancer by demographic and clinical characteristics, including age, race and ethnicity, test indication (screening or diagnostic), symptoms (for breast cancer), and screening history (for cervical cancer). We examined these characteristics by stage at diagnosis, a new variable included in the database obtained by linking with state-based central cancer registries. There were 11,569 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, 1,988 with in situ breast cancer, and 583 with invasive cervical cancer through the NBCCEDP. Women who reported breast symptoms or who had diagnostic mammography were more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, and at a later stage, than those who did not have symptoms or who had screening mammography. Women who had been rarely or never screened for cervical cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer, and at a later stage, than women who received regular screenings. Women served through the NBCCEDP who have not had prior screening or who have symptoms were more often diagnosed with late-stage disease.
    Cancer Causes and Control 02/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10552-015-0543-2 · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The benefits of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) on cervical cancer screening for participating uninsured low-income women have never been measured. Purpose To estimate the benefits in life-years (LYs) gained; quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained; and deaths averted. Methods A cervical cancer simulation model was constructed based on an existing cohort model. The model was applied to NBCCEDP participants aged 18–64 years. Screening habits for uninsured low-income women were estimated using National Health Interview Survey data from 1990 to 2005 and NBCCEDP data from 1991 to 2007. The study was conducted during 2011–2012 and covered all 68 NBCCEDP grantees in 50 states, the District of Columbia, five U.S. territories, and 12 tribal organizations. Separate simulations were performed for the following three scenarios: (1) women who received NBCCEDP (Program) screening; (2) women who received screening without the program (No Program); and (3) women who received no screening (No Screening). Results Among 1.8 million women screened in 1991–2007, the Program added 10,369 LYs gained compared to No Program, and 101,509 LYs gained compared to No Screening. The Program prevented 325 women from dying of cervical cancer relative to No Program, and 3,829 relative to No Screening. During this time period, the Program accounted for 15,589 QALYs gained when compared with No Program, and 121,529 QALYs gained when compared with No Screening. Conclusions These estimates suggest that NBCCEDP cervical cancer screening has reduced mortality among medically underserved low-income women who participated in the program.
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine 09/2014; 47(3). DOI:10.1016/j.amepre.2014.05.016 · 4.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is implemented through cooperative agreements with state health departments, US territories, and tribal health organizations (grantees). Grantees typically contract with clinicians and other providers to deliver breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services. As required by the CDC, grantees report biannually a subset of patient and clinical level program data known as the Minimum Data Elements. Rigorous processes are in place to ensure the completeness and quality of program data collection. In this article, the authors describe the NBCCEDP data-collection processes and data management system and discusses how data are used for 1) program monitoring and improvement, 2) evaluation and research, and 3) policy development and analysis. They also provide 2 examples of how grantees use data to improve their performance. Cancer 2014;120(16 suppl):2575-83. © 2014 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 08/2014; 120 Suppl 16(S16):2575-83. DOI:10.1002/cncr.28821 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. Cancer 2014;120(16 suppl):2549-56. © 2014 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 08/2014; 120 Suppl 16(16):2549-56. DOI:10.1002/cncr.28823 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little empirical evidence exists about the effectiveness of performance management systems in government. This study assessed the effectiveness of the performance management system of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) and explored why it works. METHODS: Generalized estimating equation models were used to assess change in program performance after the implementation of a performance management system. In addition, qualitative case study data including observations, interviews, and document review were analyzed using inductive methods. RESULTS: Five of the 7 indicators tested had statistically significant increases in performance postimplementation. Case study results suggest that the system is characterized by high-quality data, measures viewed by grantees as meaningful and fair, and institutionalized data use. CONCLUSIONS: Several factors help to explain the system's effectiveness including characteristics of the NBCCEDP program (eg, service delivery program), qualities of the indicators (eg, process level), financial investment in the system, and a culture of data use. (C) 2014 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 08/2014; 120 Suppl 16(16):2566-74. DOI:10.1002/cncr.28817 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) is the largest cancer screening program for low-income women in the United States. This study updates previous estimates of the costs of delivering preventive cancer screening services in the NBCCEDP. METHODS: We developed a standardized web-based cost-assessment tool to collect annual activity-based cost data on screening for breast and cervical cancer in the NBCCEDP. Data were collected from 63 of the 66 programs that received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the 2006/2007 fiscal year. We used these data to calculate costs of delivering preventive public health services in the program. RESULTS: We estimated the total cost of all NBCCEDP services to be $296 (standard deviation [SD], $123) per woman served (including the estimated value of in-kind donations, which constituted approximately 15% of this total estimated cost). The estimated cost of screening and diagnostic services was $145 (SD, $38) per women served, which represented 57.7% of the total cost excluding the value of in-kind donations. Including the value of in-kind donations, the weighted mean cost of screening a woman for breast cancer was $110 with an office visit and $88 without, the weighted mean cost of a diagnostic procedure was $401, and the weighted mean cost per breast cancer detected was $35,480. For cervical cancer, the corresponding cost estimates were $61, $21, $415, and $18,995, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These NBCCEDP cost estimates may help policy makers in planning and implementing future costs for various potential changes to the program. (C) 2014 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 08/2014; 120 Suppl 16(16):2604-11. DOI:10.1002/cncr.28816 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the quality of national data generated by the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP); to assess variables collected through the program that are appropriate to use for program management, evaluation, and data analysis; and to identify potential data-quality issues. METHODS: Information was abstracted randomly from 5603 medical records selected from 6 NBCCEDP-funded state programs, and 76 categorical variables and 11 text-based breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic variables were collected. Concordance was estimated between abstracted data and the data collected by the NBCCEDP. Overall and outcome-specific concordance was calculated for each of the key variables. Four screening performance measures also were estimated by comparing the program data with the abstracted data. RESULTS: Basic measures of program outcomes, such as the percentage of women with cancer or with abnormal screening tests, had a high concordance rate. Variables with poor or inconsistent concordance included reported breast symptoms, receipt of fine-needle aspiration, and receipt of colposcopy with biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: The overall conclusion from this comprehensive validation project of the NBCCEDP is that, with few exceptions, the data collected from individual program sites and reported to the CDC are valid and consistent with sociodemographic and clinical data within medical records. (C) 2014 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 08/2014; 120 Suppl 16(16):2597-603. DOI:10.1002/cncr.28825 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) has played a critical role in providing cancer screening services to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/ANs) women and strengthening tribal screening capacity. Since 1991, the NBCCEDP has funded states, tribal nations, and tribal organizations to develop and implement organized screening programs. The ultimate goal is to deliver breast and cervical cancer screening to women who do not have health insurance and cannot afford to pay for these services. The delivery of clinical services is supported through complementary program efforts such as professional development, public education and outreach, and patient navigation. This article seeks to describe the growth of NBCCEDP's tribal commitment and the unique history and aspects of serving the AI/AN population. The article describes: 1) how this program has demonstrated success in improving screening of AI/AN women; 2) innovative partnerships with the Indian Health Service, state programs, and other organizations that have improved tribal public health infrastructure; and 3) the evolution of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work with tribal communities. Cancer 2014;120(16 suppl):2557-65. © 2014 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 08/2014; 120 Suppl 16(S16):2557-65. DOI:10.1002/cncr.28824 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Women's Wellness Connection (WWC) program is administered by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) as part of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). WWC provides free breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income, uninsured, and underserved women across Colorado. Screening and diagnostic testing services are provided through a network of 45 clinical providers, including local public health departments, Federally Qualified Health Centers, non-profit health centers, safety net clinics, and hospitals. In 2009, CDPHE developed the Bundled Payment System (BPS) and began paying providers predetermined reimbursement levels based on expected costs of a set of breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services. BPS provides increasing levels of reimbursement for escalating case complexity for screening and diagnosis ranging from $50-$1445 across four levels for breast services and $50-$480 for cervical services. Researchers from ICF International, CDPHE, and CDC conducted an evaluation of BPS to assess effectiveness in improving timeliness and completeness of care and impacts on costs. Using a mixed-methods approach of analyzing quantitative data from WWC's electronic data management and public health surveillance system used to track clinical service delivery and reimbursement and conducting key informant interviews with providers, the research team aimed to understand the clinical, data quality and financial impacts of BPS on breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services. Findings suggest that compared to the former capitated payment model, BPS is associated with increased likelihood of timely and complete patient care and follow-up for those with abnormal breast cancer screening results. This effect was not observed for abnormal cervical cancer results. In addition, BPS has no differential effect on clinicians' ordering practices; in other words, bundled payments did not appear to incentivize unnecessary diagnostic services among WWC providers. Findings related to costs will also be discussed. When implemented in combination with policies mandating data entry timeliness and standard lost-to-follow-up procedures, bundled payments for breast cancer screening may help ensure complete and timely service provision and improved data quality for public health programs. Further, the bundled payments model of reimbursement has the potential to assist other NBCCEDP grantees who are interested in moving away from a capitated or fee-for-service model.
    141st APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition 2013; 11/2013
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    ABSTRACT: To the authors's knowledge, there are few published prospective cohort studies of colonoscopy complications in patients at average risk for colorectal cancer who received colorectal cancer screening from a community-based program. In this article, the authors report the rate of colonoscopy complications in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP), which provided colorectal cancer screening to a medically underserved population aged 50 years to 64 years for screening, diagnostic follow-up after positive stool blood tests, and surveillance purposes. Clinical data were collected prospectively from 5 community-based colorectal cancer screening programs. Complications were identified by reviewing the standardized clinical data and medical complication reporting forms submitted by the programs to the CDC. Serious complications were defined as conditions or symptoms that resulted in hospital admission within 30 days after the procedure, including perforation, gastrointestinal bleeding requiring or not requiring blood transfusion, cardiopulmonary events, postpolypectomy syndrome, excessive abdominal pain, or death. A total of 3215 individuals underwent 3355 colonoscopies. Of these, 89% of the colonoscopies were conducted for screening, 9% were conducted for diagnostic follow-up, and 2% were conducted for surveillance purposes. The mean age of the individuals was 55.9 years. Eight individuals experienced serious complications, for an incidence of 2.38 per 1000 colonoscopies. Three patients experienced bowel perforations that required surgery, 1 patient was hospitalized for postpolypectomy bleeding, 3 patients experienced cardiopulmonary events, and 1 patient visited the emergency room for excessive abdominal pain and underwent surgery for an identified colorectal mass. No deaths were reported. In the CDC's CRCSDP, in which a total of 3215 individuals underwent 3355 colonoscopies, the overall incidence of serious complications from colonoscopy was found to be low. Cancer 2013;119(15 suppl):2849-54. © 2013 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 08/2013; 119 Suppl 15:2849-54. DOI:10.1002/cncr.28159 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated the Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP) to explore the feasibility of establishing a large-scale colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program for underserved populations in the United States. The authors of this report assessed the clinical costs incurred at each of the 5 participating sites during the demonstration period. By using data on payments to providers by each of the 5 CRCSDP sites, the authors estimated costs for specific clinical services and overall clinical costs for each of the 2 CRC screening methods used by the sites: colonoscopy and fecal occult blood test (FOBT). Among CRCSDP clients who were at average risk for CRC and for whom complete cost data were available, 2131 were screened by FOBT, and 1888 were screened by colonoscopy. The total average clinical cost per individual screened by FOBT (including costs for screening, diagnosis, initial surveillance, office visits, and associated clinical services averaged across all individuals who received screening FOBT) ranged from $48 in Nebraska to $149 in Greater Seattle. This compared with an average clinical cost per individual for all services related to the colonoscopy screening ranging from $654 in St. Louis to $1600 in Baltimore City. Variations in how sites contracted with providers and in the services provided through CRCSDP affected the cost of clinical services and the complexity of collecting cost data. Health officials may find these data useful in program planning and budgeting. Cancer 2013;119(15 suppl):2863-9. © 2013 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 08/2013; 119 Suppl 15:2863-9. DOI:10.1002/cncr.28154 · 4.90 Impact Factor