Jan Krüsken

Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (11)22.52 Total impact

  • G H E Gendolla · Jan Krüsken
    The psychology of moods, Edited by Clark, A V, 01/2006: pages 57-79; Nova Science Publishers.
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    Andrea E. Abele · Jan Krüsken
    Zeitschrift für Sozialpsychologie 01/2003; 34(4):205-218. DOI:10.1024/0044-3514.34.4.205 · 0.39 Impact Factor
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    Andrea E. Abele · Mahena Stief · Jan Krüsken
    Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Psychologie 11/2002; 16(3/4):193-205. DOI:10.1024//1010-0652.16.34.193 · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    Guido H E Gendolla · Jan Krüsken
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    ABSTRACT: Drawing on the mood-behavior model (G. H. E. Gendolla, 2000), 2 experiments examined moods' informational impact on effort-related cardiovascular response. After being induced into positive versus negative moods, participants performed a memory task (Experiment 1) or a letter-cancellation task (Experiment 2). Half the participants received a cue that their mood could have been manipulated. As expected, both studies found stronger reactivity of systolic blood pressure in a negative mood than in a positive mood when no cue was provided. This effect diminished in the cue conditions. Additionally, achievement corresponded to systolic blood pressure reactivity (Experiment 1), the cue manipulation had no effect on mood, and mood had a congruency effect on subjective task difficulty in the no-cue conditions (Experiment 2).
    Emotion 10/2002; 2(3):251-62. DOI:10.1037/1528-3542.2.3.251 · 3.88 Impact Factor
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    Guido H E Gendolla · Jan Krüsken
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    ABSTRACT: Drawing on the mood-behavior model (G. H. E. Gendolla, 2000) and J. W. Brehm and E. A. Self's (1989) theory of effort mobilization, 2 experiments investigated the joint effect of mood, task difficulty, and performance-contingent consequences on effort-related cardiovascular response. Informational mood impact on demand appraisals and performance-contingent consequences had a joint effect on effort mobilization. When consequences were noncontingent on performance, mood interacted with task difficulty to determine cardiovascular reactivity in the shape of a cross-over interaction pattern. Yet when positive consequences were performance contingent, cardiovascular reactivity strongly increased only in the negative-mood/difficult-task condition--the subjectively appraised high necessary effort was now justified. Implications for the role of mood in motivation are discussed.
    Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 09/2002; 83(2):271-83. DOI:10.1037//0022-3514.83.2.271 · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    Guido H. E. Gendolla · Jan Krüsken
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    ABSTRACT: Drawing on the mood-behaviour model (Gendolla, 2000), two studies investigated informational effects of mood on effort-related cardiovascular response. Experiment 1 manipulated mood state (positive, negative) and task difficulty (easy, difficult, extremely difficult). Effects on cardiovascular reactivity were as expected: On the easy level, reactivity was weak in a positive mood, but strong in a negative mood; on the difficult level, reactivity was strong in a positive mood, but weak in a negative mood; on the extremely difficulty level mood had no effect. Experiment 2 manipulated mood only. As predicted, subjective demand and cardiovascular response were both higher in a negative mood than in a positive mood and the mood effect on cardiovascular response diminished after statistically controlling for the demand appraisals. Neither study revealed any mood effects on cardiovascular response during the mood inductions.
    Cognition and Emotion 08/2002; 16(5):577-603. DOI:10.1080/02699930143000446 · 2.52 Impact Factor
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    Guido H.E Gendolla · Jan Krüsken
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the impact of mood states and task valence on cardiovascular reactivity in active coping. According to previous research, subjective demand is higher in a negative mood than in a positive mood, and cardiovascular adjustments are a function of subjective demand. Thus, we expected stronger cardiovascular reactivity in a negative mood than in a positive mood during task performance. University students (n=60) were first induced into either a positive or negative mood state via exposure to music. They then performed either a pleasant or unpleasant scenario completion task that provided opportunities for mood regulation. No effects were found on cardiovascular reactivity during the mood inductions. However, during task performance, systolic and diastolic blood pressure reactivity was stronger in a negative than in a positive mood. Task valence, which was successfully manipulated according to a verbal manipulation check, and post-performance mood changes had no significant impact. Results are interpreted as a further demonstration of the impact of mood valence on cardiovascular reactivity in active coping.
    International Journal of Psychophysiology 07/2001; 41(2):169-80. DOI:10.1016/S0167-8760(01)00130-1 · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    Guido H.e. Gendolla · Jan Krüsken
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    ABSTRACT: An experiment with N = 56 university students investigated the joint effects of manipulated mood state and task difficulty on cardiovascular and electrodermal reactivity during mood inductions and performance on a letter cancellation task. We tested our theory-based prediction that moods per se do not involve autonomic adjustments whereas mood and task difficulty interact during task performance to determine autonomic reactivity with respect to active coping. Specifically, we anticipated for an easy task weaker reactivity in a positive mood (due to low subjective demand) than in a negative mood (due to high subjective demand). Conversely, we expected, for a difficult task, stronger reactivity in a positive mood (high, but not yet too high, subjective demand) than in a negative mood (too high subjective demand). Adjustments of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and tonic skin conductance level described exactly the predicted pattern. Furthermore, task performance was associated with autonomic reactivity in the difficult conditions.
    Psychophysiology 06/2001; 38(3):548-56. DOI:10.1017/S0048577201000622 · 3.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of mood on effort quantified as autonomic adjustments was investigated in an experiment. The authors induced positive versus negative moods with either 1 of 2 mood induction procedures (music vs. autobiographical recollection) that differed in the extent of required effort. Then participants performed an achievement task after demand appraisals were made. Results were as predicted. During the mood inductions, autonomic reactivity (systolic blood pressure [SBP], diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, skin conductance responses) was stronger in the relatively effortful recollection conditions than in the relatively effortless music conditions. Mood valence had no impact here. But in the context of task performance, the authors found (a) mood congruency effects on the demand appraisals that reflected subjectively higher demand in a negative than in a positive mood, and (b) stronger SBP reactivity in a negative mood compared with a positive mood. Furthermore, SBP reactivity during task performance was correlated with achievement.
    Emotion 04/2001; 1(1):12-24. DOI:10.1037//1528-3542.1.1.12 · 3.88 Impact Factor
  • 01/2001; 9(2). DOI:10.1515/dmvm-2001-0036