Jeffrey Munson

University of Washington Seattle, Seattle, Washington, United States

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Publications (34)233.1 Total impact

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    DESCRIPTION: Estes, A., Munson, J., Rogers, S. J., Greenson, J., Winter, J., & Dawson, G. (April 01, 2015). Long-Term Outcomes of Early Intervention in 6-Year-Old Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 1.) We prospectively examine evidence for the sustained effects of early intervention based on a follow-up study of 39 children with ASD who began participation in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) at age 18-30 months. The intervention, conducted at a high level of intensity in-home for 2 years, showed evidence of efficacy immediately posttreatment. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Note to users: Accepted manuscripts are Articles in Press that have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by the Editorial Board of this publication. They have not yet been copy edited and/or formatted in the publication house style, and may not yet have the full ScienceDirect functionality, e.g., supplementary files may still need to be added, links to references may not resolve yet etc. The text could still change before final publication. Although accepted manuscripts do not have all bibliographic details available yet, they can already be cited using the year of online publication and the DOI, as follows: author(s), article title, Publication (year), DOI. Please consult the journal's reference style for the exact appearance of these elements, abbreviation of journal names and use of punctuation. When the final article is assigned to an volumes/issues of the Publication, the Article in Press version will be removed and the final version will appear in the associated published volumes/issues of the Publication. The date the article was first made available online will be carried over.
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    ABSTRACT: We prospectively examined evidence for the sustained effects of early intervention based on a follow-up study of 39 children with ASD who began participation in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) at age 18 to 30 months. The intervention, conducted at a high level of intensity in-home for 2 years, showed evidence of efficacy immediately posttreatment. This group of children was assessed at age 6 years, 2 years after the intervention ended, across multiple domains of functioning by clinicians naive to previous intervention group status. The ESDM group, on average, maintained gains made in early intervention during the 2-year follow-up period in overall intellectual ability, adaptive behavior, symptom severity, and challenging behavior. No group differences in core autism symptoms were found immediately posttreatment; however, 2 years later, the ESDM group demonstrated improved core autism symptoms and adaptive behavior as compared with the community-intervention-as-usual (COM) group. The 2 groups were not significantly different in terms of intellectual functioning at age 6 years. Both groups received equivalent intervention hours during the original study, but the ESDM group received fewer hours during the follow-up period. These results provide evidence that gains from early intensive intervention are maintained 2 years later. Notably, core autism symptoms improved in the ESDM group over the follow-up period relative to the COM group. This improvement occurred at the same time that the ESDM group received significantly fewer services. This is the first study to examine the role of early ESDM behavioral intervention initiated at less than 30 months of age in altering the longer-term developmental course of autism. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 04/2015; 54(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jaac.2015.04.005 · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been suggested that atypical amygdala function contributes to the social impairments characteristic of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Previous research has demonstrated that adolescents and adults with ASD generate normal response during a fear-potentiated startle paradigm, suggesting this aspect of amygdala function is intact and may not account for the social dysfunction associated with the condition. The amygdala also plays a crucial role in the expression of anxiety and may contribute to high rates of reported anxiety in individuals with ASD. The present study partially replicates prior work by examining the fear-potentiated startle response in adolescents with ASD, and extends this to investigate the relationship between startle response and anxiety. Eyeblink magnitude and latency (electromyographic activity; EMG) were collected from 20 adolescents with ASD and 19 typically developing (TD) age-matched adolescents during a fear-potentiated startle paradigm. Parent-report and self-report of anxiety and additional psychiatric symptoms were collected. Parental reports indicated higher rates of associated psychopathology in adolescents with ASD compared with TD adolescents. Consistent with previous results, both groups showed normal potentiated startle response, and no group differences in EMG were found. Symptoms of anxiety and level of social impairment were unrelated to startle response. These findings held for all levels of anxiety, suggesting that within the context of the fear-potentiated startle paradigm, amygdala response is not associated with degree of atypical social or emotional functioning in ASD. Autism Res 2013, ●●: ●●-●●. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Autism Research 10/2013; 6(5). DOI:10.1002/aur.1289 · 4.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the impact of a parent-coaching intervention based on the Early Start Denver Model (P-ESDM) on parenting-related stress and sense of competence. This was part of a multisite, randomized trial comparing P-ESDM (n = 49) with community intervention (n = 49) for children aged 12 and 24 months. The P-ESDM group reported no increase in parenting stress, whereas the Community group experienced an increase over the same 3-month period. Parental sense of competence did not differ. Number of negative life events was a significant predictor of parenting stress and sense of competence across both groups. This suggests that a parent-coaching intervention may help maintain parental adjustment directly after a child is diagnosed with ASD.
    Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 07/2013; 44(2). DOI:10.1007/s10803-013-1874-z · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that affects social behavior and language acquisition. ASD exhibits great variability in outcomes, with some individuals remaining nonverbal and others exhibiting average or above average function. Cognitive ability contributes to heterogeneity in autism and serves as a modest predictor of later function. We show that a brain measure (event-related potentials, ERPs) of word processing in children with ASD, assessed at the age of 2 years (N = 24), is a broad and robust predictor of receptive language, cognitive ability, and adaptive behavior at ages 4 and 6 years, regardless of the form of intensive clinical treatment during the intervening years. The predictive strength of this brain measure increases over time, and exceeds the predictive strength of a measure of cognitive ability, used here for comparison. These findings have theoretical implications and may eventually lead to neural measures that allow early prediction of developmental outcomes as well as more individually tailored clinical interventions, with the potential for greater effectiveness in treating children with ASD.
    PLoS ONE 05/2013; 8(5):e64967. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0064967 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background:Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are at risk for higher stress levels than parents of children with other developmental disabilities and typical development. Recent advances in early diagnosis have resulted in younger children being diagnosed with ASDs but factors associated with parent stress in this age group are not well understood. Aims: The present study examined parenting-related stress and psychological distress in mothers of toddlers with ASD, developmental delay without ASD (DD), and typical development. The impact of child problem behavior and daily living skills on parenting-stress and psychological distress were further investigated. Methods: Participants were part of a larger research study on early ASD intervention. Results: Parent self-report of parenting-related stress and psychological distress was utilized. Parents of toddlers with ASD demonstrated increased parenting-related stress compared with parents of toddlers with DD and typical development. However, psychological distress did not differ significantly between the groups. Child behavior problems, but not daily living skills emerged as a significant predictor of parenting-related stress and psychological distress. This was true for both mothers of children with ASD and DD. Conclusions: These finding suggest that parents' abilities to manage and reduce behavior problems is a critical target for interventions for young children with ASD and DD in order to improve child functioning and decrease parenting-related stress.
    Brain & development 11/2012; 35(2). DOI:10.1016/j.braindev.2012.10.004 · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 62 lung transplant centers in the United States are unevenly distributed. We examined whether remote dwelling (distance from one's primary residence to the nearest lung transplant center) or rural dwelling (as opposed to urban) influences patients' access to lung transplantation, and whether such relationships changed following introduction of the lung allocation score (LAS) in May 2005. Between July 2001 and February 2009, 14 015 patients were listed for lung transplantation and 7923 (56.5%) were transplanted. Americans lived a median of 90.3 miles (IQR: 45.3-159.4) from the closest transplant center. Distance from a lung transplant center was inversely associated with the hazard of being listed before LAS implementation (adjusted HR for 100 miles = 0.87 [0.83-0.90]) and afterward (0.81 [0.78-0.85]); LAS implementation did not modify this relationship (p = 0.38). Once waitlisted, distance from the closest center was not associated with time to transplantation, and among those transplanted, distance was not associated with survival. Similar results were identified for rural, as opposed to urban, residence. We conclude that geographic disparaties exist in access to lung transplantation in the United States. These are mediated by listing practices rather than by transplantation rates, and were not mitigated by LAS implementation.
    American Journal of Transplantation 08/2012; 12(11). DOI:10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04202.x · 6.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the relative hazard of muscle toxicity, renal dysfunction, and hepatic dysfunction associated with the drug interaction between statins and concomitant medications that inhibit the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. Although statins provide important clinical benefits related to mitigating the risk of cardiovascular events, this class of medications also has the potential for severe adverse reactions. The risk for adverse events may be potentiated by concomitant use of medications that interfere with statin metabolism. Data from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) from 1990 to 2008 were used to conduct a retrospective cohort study. Cohorts were created to evaluate each outcome (muscle toxicity, renal dysfunction, and hepatic dysfunction) independently. Each cohort included new statin initiators and compared the relative hazard of the outcome. The interaction ratio (I*R) was the primary contrast of interest. The I*R represents the relative effect of each statin type (statin 3A4 substrate vs. statin non-3A4 substrate) with a CYP3A4 inhibitor, independent of the effect of the statin type without a CYP3A4 inhibitor. We adjusted for confounding variables using the multinomial propensity score. The median follow-up time per cohort was 1.5 years. There were 7889 muscle toxicity events among 362,809 patients and 792,665 person-years. The adjusted muscle toxicity I*R was 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.90-1.66). There were 1449 renal dysfunction events among 272,099 patients and 574,584 person-years. The adjusted renal dysfunction I*R was 0.91 (95%CI = 0.58-1.44). There were 1434 hepatic dysfunction events among 367,612 patients and 815,945 person-years. The adjusted hepatic dysfunction I*R was 0.78 (95%CI = 0.45-1.31). Overall, this study found no difference in the relative hazard of muscle toxicity, renal dysfunction, or hepatic dysfunction for patients prescribed a statin 3A4 substrate versus a statin non-3A4 substrate with CYP3A4 inhibitor concomitancy.
    Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety 05/2012; 21(5):494-506. DOI:10.1002/pds.3199 · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to assess whether digoxin has a different effect on mortality risk for women than it does for men in patients with heart failure (HF). This study uses the UK-based The Health Information Network population database in a cohort study of the impact of digoxin exposure on mortality for men and women who carry the diagnosis of HF. Digoxin exposure was assessed based on prescribing data. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess whether there was an interaction between sex and digoxin affecting mortality hazard. The setting was primary care outpatient practices. The study cohort consisted of 17 707 men and 19 227 women with the diagnosis of HF who contributed only time without digoxin exposure and 9487 men and 10 808 women with the diagnosis of HF who contributed time with digoxin exposure. The main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. The primary outcome of this study was the absence of a large interaction between digoxin use and sex affecting mortality. For men, digoxin use was associated with a HR for mortality of 1.00, while for women, the HR was also 1.00 (p value for interaction 0.65). The results of sensitivity analyses were consistent with those of the primary analysis. Observational data do not support the concern that there is a substantial increased risk of mortality due to the use of digoxin in women. This finding is consistent with previous observational studies but discordant with results from a post hoc analysis of a randomised controlled trial of digoxin versus placebo.
    BMJ Open 03/2012; 2(2):e000888. DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-000888 · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex mode of inheritance. It is one of the most highly heritable of the complex disorders, although the underlying genetic factors remain largely unknown. Here, we report mutations in the X-chromosome PTCHD1 (patched-related) gene in seven families with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in three families with intellectual disability. A 167-kilobase microdeletion spanning exon 1 was found in two brothers, one with ASD and the other with a learning disability and ASD features; a 90-kilobase microdeletion spanning the entire gene was found in three males with intellectual disability in a second family. In 900 probands with ASD and 208 male probands with intellectual disability, we identified seven different missense changes (in eight male probands) that were inherited from unaffected mothers and not found in controls. Two of the ASD individuals with missense changes also carried a de novo deletion at another ASD susceptibility locus (DPYD and DPP6), suggesting complex genetic contributions. In additional males with ASD, we identified deletions in the 5' flanking region of PTCHD1 that disrupted a complex noncoding RNA and potential regulatory elements; equivalent changes were not found in male control individuals. Thus, our systematic screen of PTCHD1 and its 5' flanking regions suggests that this locus is involved in ~1% of individuals with ASD and intellectual disability.
    Science translational medicine 09/2010; 2(49):49ra68. DOI:10.1126/scitranslmed.3001267 · 14.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To conduct a randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a comprehensive developmental behavioral intervention, for improving outcomes of toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Forty-eight children diagnosed with ASD between 18 and 30 months of age were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (1) ESDM intervention, which is based on developmental and applied behavioral analytic principles and delivered by trained therapists and parents for 2 years; or (2) referral to community providers for intervention commonly available in the community. Compared with children who received community-intervention, children who received ESDM showed significant improvements in IQ, adaptive behavior, and autism diagnosis. Two years after entering intervention, the ESDM group on average improved 17.6 standard score points (1 SD: 15 points) compared with 7.0 points in the comparison group relative to baseline scores. The ESDM group maintained its rate of growth in adaptive behavior compared with a normative sample of typically developing children. In contrast, over the 2-year span, the comparison group showed greater delays in adaptive behavior. Children who received ESDM also were more likely to experience a change in diagnosis from autism to pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified, than the comparison group. This is the first randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate the efficacy of a comprehensive developmental behavioral intervention for toddlers with ASD for improving cognitive and adaptive behavior and reducing severity of ASD diagnosis. Results of this study underscore the importance of early detection of and intervention in autism.
    PEDIATRICS 11/2009; 125(1):e17-23. DOI:10.1542/peds.2009-0958 · 5.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Parents of children with developmental disabilities, particularly autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), are at risk for high levels of distress. The factors contributing to this are unclear. This study investigated how child characteristics influence maternal parenting stress and psychological distress. Participants consisted of mothers and developmental-age matched preschool-aged children with ASD (N = 51) and developmental delay without autism (DD) ( N = 22). Evidence for higher levels of parenting stress and psychological distress was found in mothers in the ASD group compared to the DD group. Children's problem behavior was associated with increased parenting stress and psychological distress in mothers in the ASD and DD groups. This relationship was stronger in the DD group. Daily living skills were not related to parenting stress or psychological distress. Results suggest clinical services aiming to support parents should include a focus on reducing problem behaviors in children with developmental disabilities.
    Autism 08/2009; 13(4):375-87. DOI:10.1177/1362361309105658 · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders with complex genetic origins. Previous studies focusing on candidate genes or genomic regions have identified several copy number variations (CNVs) that are associated with an increased risk of ASDs. Here we present the results from a whole-genome CNV study on a cohort of 859 ASD cases and 1,409 healthy children of European ancestry who were genotyped with approximately 550,000 single nucleotide polymorphism markers, in an attempt to comprehensively identify CNVs conferring susceptibility to ASDs. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent cohort of 1,336 ASD cases and 1,110 controls of European ancestry. Besides previously reported ASD candidate genes, such as NRXN1 (ref. 10) and CNTN4 (refs 11, 12), several new susceptibility genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules, including NLGN1 and ASTN2, were enriched with CNVs in ASD cases compared to controls (P = 9.5 x 10(-3)). Furthermore, CNVs within or surrounding genes involved in the ubiquitin pathways, including UBE3A, PARK2, RFWD2 and FBXO40, were affected by CNVs not observed in controls (P = 3.3 x 10(-3)). We also identified duplications 55 kilobases upstream of complementary DNA AK123120 (P = 3.6 x 10(-6)). Although these variants may be individually rare, they target genes involved in neuronal cell-adhesion or ubiquitin degradation, indicating that these two important gene networks expressed within the central nervous system may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of ASD.
    Nature 05/2009; 459(7246):569-73. DOI:10.1038/nature07953 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of childhood neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impairment of social interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of interests and behaviour. To identify common genetic risk factors underlying ASDs, here we present the results of genome-wide association studies on a cohort of 780 families (3,101 subjects) with affected children, and a second cohort of 1,204 affected subjects and 6,491 control subjects, all of whom were of European ancestry. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms between cadherin 10 (CDH10) and cadherin 9 (CDH9)-two genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules-revealed strong association signals, with the most significant SNP being rs4307059 (P = 3.4 x 10(-8), odds ratio = 1.19). These signals were replicated in two independent cohorts, with combined P values ranging from 7.4 x 10(-8) to 2.1 x 10(-10). Our results implicate neuronal cell-adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of ASDs, and represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of genome-wide significant association of common variants with susceptibility to ASDs.
    Nature 05/2009; 459(7246):528-33. DOI:10.1038/nature07999 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Currently, the heterogeneity in the developmental trajectories of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is poorly understood. Preschool children with ASD participating in a longitudinal study received a battery of neurocognitive tasks that measured the learning of reward associations (Lrn-Rew), spatial working memory (SpatWM), and imitation from memory and novelty preference (Mem/Nov), as well as a measure of nonverbal problem-solving ability (NVDQ). Growth curve analyses via HLM were used to predict the variability in growth rates between age 4 to age 6.5 in Vineland Socialization and Communication scores. Individual differences in both Lrn-Rew and Mem/Nov were significantly related to Socialization and Communication growth rates above and beyond NVDQ, whereas SpatWM was not. Thus, specific aspects of neurocognitive functioning appear to be important predictors of developmental variability during the preschool years in children with ASD. We speculate that these findings support the combined role of ventromedial prefrontal and medial temporal lobe systems in the early pathogenesis of ASD and may be useful in predicting developmental trajectory. The benefits and challenges of assessing specific neurocognitive functions in children with autism is discussed with regard to general cognitive/developmental ability and the behavioral requirements of most assessment settings.
    Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 12/2008; 14(6):956-66. DOI:10.1017/S1355617708081393 · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism is currently viewed as a spectrum condition that includes strikingly different severity levels; IQ is consistently described as one of the primary aspects of the heterogeneity in autism. To investigate the possibility of more than one distinct subtype of autism based on IQ both latent class analysis and taxometrics methods were used to classify Mullen IQs in a sample of 456 children with autism spectrum disorder. We found evidence for multiple IQbased subgroups using both methods. Groups differed in level of intellectual functioning and patterns of verbal versus nonverbal ability. Results support the notion of distinct subtypes of autism that differ in severity of intellectual ability, patterns of cognitive strengths and weaknesses, and severity of autism symptoms.
    American journal of mental retardation: AJMR 12/2008; 113:439-452. DOI:10.1352/2008.113:439-452 · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an early onset of abnormal social, communicative, and repetitive behavior. Engrailed-2 (EN2) was identified as an autism candidate gene because its influence on cerebellar development in mice parallels neurodevelopmental abnormalities seen in individuals with autism. Studies investigating association between markers at EN2 (chr7q36), a location associated with language disorders, and autism reveal mixed findings. Two positive reports revealed association with two intronic SNPs. Since the associated SNPs were in high linkage disequilibrium and shared similar minor allele frequencies, we chose to test whether one of the SNPs (rs1861972) was associated with autism in three recruiting sites from the NIH Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism (CPEA) network. A recessive model revealed significant association with broad autism spectrum disorder. Site specific analyses indicated differential allele transmission by site, despite similar ethnicity, and parental genotypes, suggesting the SNP may contribute to various risk haplotypes. No significant association with autism was found under an additive model for either a broad (autism spectrum disorder) or a narrow (autistic disorder) diagnostic group. Although our findings were not as robust as the previous studies, they suggest that rs1861972 may influence the risk for autism spectrum disorders. Future studies investigating EN2 should consider how the association of variants in this gene with autism could be influenced by differences in phenotype and possible interactions with genotypes at other autism candidate genes.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 03/2008; 147B(2):187-93. DOI:10.1002/ajmg.b.30585 · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been shown that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) demonstrate normal activation in the fusiform gyrus when viewing familiar, but not unfamiliar faces. The current study utilized eye tracking to investigate patterns of attention underlying familiar versus unfamiliar face processing in ASD. Eye movements of 18 typically developing participants and 17 individuals with ASD were recorded while passively viewing three face categories: unfamiliar non-repeating faces, a repeating highly familiar face, and a repeating previously unfamiliar face. Results suggest that individuals with ASD do not exhibit more normative gaze patterns when viewing familiar faces. A second task assessed facial recognition accuracy and response time for familiar and novel faces. The groups did not differ on accuracy or reaction times.
    Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 03/2008; 38(9):1666-75. DOI:10.1007/s10803-008-0550-1 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The relation between level of intellectual functioning and risk for associated symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was investigated. Cognitive ability and associated symptoms were assessed directly and/or via parent report in 74 children with ASD at 6 and 9 years of age. Participants were classified as lower and higher functioning using Nonverbal and Verbal IQ and Communication scores on the Vineland at age 6. Children with higher functioning at age 6 displayed increased internalizing symptoms by age 9, whereas children with lower functioning displayed higher hyperactivity, attention problems, and irritability by age 9. Results suggest that level of intellectual functioning may be a risk factor for different patterns of associated symptoms by later childhood.
    American journal of mental retardation: AJMR 12/2007; 112(6):439-49. DOI:10.1352/0895-8017(2007)112[439:LOIFPP]2.0.CO;2 · 2.51 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
233.10 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2015
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
      • • Department of Psychology
      • • Center on Human Development and Disability
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2012
    • William Penn University
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
    • Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center
      LEB, New Hampshire, United States
  • 2009
    • The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
      • Center for Applied Genomics
      Philadelphia, PA, United States