Jose Luis Tapia

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, United States

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Publications (13)5.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A definitive diagnosis is crucial for management of any oral mucosal disease. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) is a valuable diagnostic aid for immune-mediated blistering diseases and systemic connective tissue diseases of the skin and the mucosa. This paper gives an overview of the DIF biopsy technique for oral lesions and provides a background for the clinician to optimize the utilization of DIF biopsy. The key characteristic diagnostic findings of DIF of specific mucosal diseases are also discussed.
    Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany: 1985) 10/2014; · 0.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the tissue response to implanted polishing and prophylaxis materials using a rat model system. Two polishing pastes (diamond polishing paste and aluminum polishing paste), two prophylaxis materials (prophylaxis paste with fluoride and air polishing prophylaxis powder) and negative and positive controls were subcutaneously implanted in rats. Tissue specimens obtained after 2 days, 1, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after implantation were processed for routine hematoxylin and eosin staining and polarized light evaluation. Air polishing prophylaxis powder produced a mild inflammatory response. A more intense inflammation was elicited by diamond polishing paste, and the prophylaxis paste with fluoride elicited an even greater response. The aluminum polishing paste produced the most severe and persistent tissue response, which was of the granulomatous type. This finding suggests that foreign body reaction should be considered in a gingivitis that does not respond to plaque control or does not represent a mucocutaneous lesion.
    Journal of the International Academy of Periodontology 10/2011; 13(3):86-92.
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    Jose Luis Tapia, Louis J Goldberg
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    ABSTRACT: An important inconsistency currently exists in the literature on oral cancer. Reviewing this literature, one finds that the term oral cancer is defined and described with great variation. In a search in PubMed, at least 17 different terms were found for titles of papers reporting data on oral cancer. The variability of the terms used for designating anatomic regions and type of malignant neoplasms for reporting oral cancer has hampered the ability of researchers to effectively retrieve information concerning oral cancer. Therefore, it is sometimes extremely difficult to provide meaningful comparisons among various studies of oral cancer. Recently, a new ontological strategy that is rooted in consensus-based controlled vocabularies has been proposed to improve the consistency of data in dental research (Smith et al. in J Am Dent Assoc 141:1173-1175, 2010). In this paper, we analyzed the terminology dilemma on oral cancer and explained the current situation. We proposed a possible solution to the dilemma using an ontology-based approach. The advantages for applying this strategy are also discussed.
    Head and Neck Pathology 09/2011; 5(4):376-84.
  • J.L. TAPIA
    03/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Oral melanoacanthoma is an uncommon reactive condition that appears as a solitary pigmented lesion and is most often found on the buccal mucosa. For it to appear in the gingiva is extremely rare--only 11 cases are reported in the literature. This article presents a case of gingival melanoacanthoma and reviews the previously published cases. Because gingival melanoacanthoma shares clinical features with other pigmented lesions with diverse genesis, the differential diagnosis of a solitary pigmented lesion on the gingiva is also discussed.
    Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany: 1985) 03/2011; 42(3):253-8. · 0.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report two unusual cases of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of minor salivary glands that microscopically mimicked pleomorphic adenoma. One of these lesions presented in the retromolar region and the other in the buccal mucosa. The microscopic features of these two tumors and their intimate relationship with regional mucous minor salivary glands posed a diagnostic challenge. Awareness of the morphological diversity of SFT coupled to a judicious use of appropriate immunohistochemical probes should prove valuable to accurately segregate SFT from pleomorphic adenoma.
    Head and Neck Pathology 03/2011; 5(3):314-20.
  • Jose Luis Tapia, Mirdza E Neiders, Alfredo Aguirre
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 07/2007; 103(6):727-30. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment of salivary stones includes both surgical and non-surgical techniques. Surgical approaches range from excision of the sialolith, for those near the duct orifice, to removal of the affected salivary gland and its associated duct, for stones near the hilum of the gland. We present a case of two sialoliths triggering an acute infection in a residual Wharton's duct, 12 years after the removal of the associated submandibular gland. Excision of the sialoliths and treatment of the infected duct via sialodochoplasty was successfully performed in this patient. If the Wharton's duct is not removed with the associated submandibular gland, the potential for infection and continuous growth of dormant calcifications exists. We also address the aetiology, pathogenesis, and management of patients with sialolithiasis in the absence of a major salivary gland.
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 03/2007; 121(2):182-5. · 0.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cheilitis glandularis (CG) is a rare inflammatory salivary gland disease that usually affects the lips. Although the etiology of CG is still unknown, it is believed to be a hereditary disease with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Three clinical presentations of CG are described in the literature: simple, superficial suppurative, and deep suppurative. A case of deep suppurative CG that extended to the buccal mucosa has been previously reported as suppurative stomatitis glandularis (SSG). Here we report a case of SSG in a 64-year-old white female with a history of bilateral renal transplants for adult polycystic kidney disease, who presented with painful swollen lips and bilateral buccal mucosal lesions. The diagnosis and management of the case is discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of SSG, a rare condition affecting the minor salivary glands in the oral cavity.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 03/2005; 99(2):175-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common autosomal dominant diseases affecting multiple systems including the vascular, skeletal, and central nervous system. Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, associated with musculoskeletal and skin manifestations. Coexistence of central giant cell lesions in patients with both NS and NF1 were reported in the literature. Development of multiple central giant cell lesions in a patient with a Noonan syndrome has been referred to as Noonan-like syndrome. A few cases with features of NF1 and NS have been termed as NF1-NS. Here, we present a case of so-called NF-NS associated with a central giant cell lesion.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 10/2004; 98(3):316-20.
  • J L Tapia, A Aguirre, M Garvey, M Zeid
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 04/2004; 97(3):301-6.
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    Alpha Omegan 01/2003; 95(4):21-4.
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    ABSTRACT: A 46-year-old male sought periodontal care for a swelling on his right mandibular gingiva. An excisional biopsy revealed a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Surgical treatment consisted of a right segmental mandibulectomy with ipsilateral right neck dissection and fibular free flap reconstruction. Two days after the surgical procedure, a weakened Doppler signal suggested vascular compromise of the graft. The patient was returned to the operating room where complete thrombosis of the internal jugular vein (recipient vessel) was observed. This event prompted a complete hematological evaluation that disclosed low serum levels of protein S. The patient was started on systemic heparin and local medicinal leeches. A week later, systemic warfarin sodium was added and successfully resolved the vascular compromise of the graft. Two years later, the patient is active and lives a full life with occasional adjustments of warfarin sodium. This case represents the first report on the treatment of gingival carcinoma that led to the serendipitous discovery of an unrelated and unusual systemic condition, protein S deficiency.
    Journal of Periodontology 11/2002; 73(10):1197-201. · 2.40 Impact Factor