Jay A. Spicer

Kansas City VA Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, United States

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Publications (15)24.65 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This article describes the development of a radiopharmaceutical (RP) computer database. Development and implementation of the database and services provided are presented. A commercial database program was used to develop the structure for a radiopharmaceutical information database (RID) and to classify interaction information into several categories. The database is accessible to a variety of users through a network server. Information entered into the RID may be accessed easily and rapidly. The RID provides a wide spectrum of information services to its customers. The RID described is the first attempt to develop a database capable of entry and retrieval of RP information in an efficient and timely manner. The database is easy to use and maintain, and has virtually unlimited storage space on a network drive.
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology 10/1999; 27(3):230-3.
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    J A Spicer, W B Hladik, W E Mulberry
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    ABSTRACT: Adverse affects of various drugs on the labeling efficiency of RBCs with 99mTc-pertechnetate have been known for several years. This study presents data on the ability of the UltraTag RBC kit to label RBCs with pertechnetate in the presence of various antineoplastic drugs. Five different antineoplastic drugs, either alone or in combination, were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with 2-mL samples of whole blood obtained from normal volunteers. Each sample was labeled with pertechnetate and the radiochemical purity determined according to the UltraTag RBC product package insert. Doxorubicin was specifically tested in molar ratios with stannous ion of greater than 1:1 to determine if there was any significant chelation effect that would affect the ability of the kit to label RBCs. In addition, patients were given a bolus injection of doxorubicin and a blood sample was drawn at 30 min to test whether the metabolites had any effect on labeling. The ability of the UltraTag RBC kit to label RBCs with pertechnetate was not adversely affected by the antineoplastic drugs when they were present alone or in combination. Likewise, doxorubicin metabolites did not interfere with the labeling efficiency of 99mTc RBCs using the UltraTag RBC kit. Molar ratios of doxorubicin-to-tin that exceeded 1:1 also had no adverse effects on the labeling efficiency of the UltraTag RBC kit. When performing nuclear medicine exams involving the labeling of RBCs with pertechnetate on patients who have received doxorubicin, as well as certain other antineoplastic agents, a high RBC labeling efficiency can be obtained if the UltraTag RBC kit is used.
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology 07/1999; 27(2):132-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Two pediatric cases are described in which the results of each patient's bone scan demonstrated abnormal stomach uptake. There have been a number of reports in the literature describing stomach uptake of bone agents, however, it is an uncommon finding.
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology 04/1999; 27(1):43-4.
  • J A Spicer, W B Hladik
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology 04/1997; 25(1):70.
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    ABSTRACT: Bone metastases are a major problem in the clinical management of patients with breast or prostate cancer. Severe bone pain can be a particularly debilitating effect of metastatic disease, resulting in a growing dependency on opioid analgesics and a reduced quality of life in patients who have a short time to survive. The radiopharmaceutical strontium-89 has been demonstrated to be generally well tolerated as well as effective in reducing metastatic bone pain in breast or prostate cancer patients. Unlike other radioisotopes or external radiation treatments, it represents systemic, targeted therapy that is simple and fast to administer in an outpatient setting. Data accumulated over the last 15 years demonstrates that 89Sr provides pain relief in up to 80% of patients with bony metastases arising from breast or prostatic malignancies. Pain palliation is maintained for several months, along with improvements in functional status and quality of life. As many as one fifth of 89Sr-treated patients become pain free and require no further pain medication. The adverse effects of intravenous 89Sr are minimal. Bone marrow toxicity is observed in many patients, resulting in some reduction of platelet and white blood cell counts. Despite reductions of 20% to 30%, these hematologic effects are generally reversible and the majority of patients maintain platelet counts that are within normal limits. Strontium-89 is effective systemic radioisotopic therapy for the palliation of painful bony metastases from breast and prostate carcinoma.
    Seminars in Oncology 07/1993; 20(3 Suppl 2):44-8. · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Management of bone pain in patients with multiple osseous metastases is a significant clinical problem. Phosphorus-32 has been used as systemic radioisotope therapy for the management of bone pain for over 40 years. However, significant hematological depression usually results and its use is limited. More recently, the bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals strontium-89, samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonic acid, and rhenium-186-hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate have all been used as palliative treatment for patients with clinically significant bone pain. Excellent clinical responses with acceptable hematological toxicity have been observed. The clinical results rival those of external beam radiation therapy, with fewer systemic and hematological side effects. Systemic radionuclide therapy is indicated in the management of patients with painful metastatic prostate cancer in bone as soon as they escape primary hormonal management. This therapy also should play a role in the management of many patients with advanced breast cancer metastatic to bone. The role of radionuclidic therapy in osseous metastases from other malignancies is still being investigated. These compounds also hold promise as primary therapy for tumors of osseous origin. Systemic radionuclide therapy of painful bony metastases will become common in nuclear medicine practice in the next decade.
    Seminars in Nuclear Medicine 02/1992; 22(1):28-32. DOI:10.1016/S0001-2998(05)80154-0 · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 16 alpha-[123I]Iodo-17 beta-estradiol (16 alpha-[123I]E2) has been characterized for use as a selective radioligand for estrogen receptor (ERc) that is capable of generating in situ images of ERc-positive tumors. High specific activity 16 alpha-[123I]E2 (7,500-10,000 Ci/mmol) was used in all determinations. Radiochemical purity was determined by thin layer chromatography, and the selectivity of radioligand for ERc was evaluated using size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography on ERc prepared from rodent uteri. Efficiencies of radioidination approaching 100% were achieved, and excellent receptor selectivity was obtained even when the efficiency of radioiodination was as low as 10%. Low radiochemical purity was always associated with poor selectivity for ERc. No new radioligand species was generated during the course of radiodecay; however, reduced binding over time, even when increased activity was used to compensate for radiodecay, indicated that the formation of a radioinert competitor does occur. 16 alpha-[123I]E2 demonstrated stable, high affinity binding to ERc and was concentrated by ERc-positive tissues. After injecting 16 alpha-[123I]E2 in vivo, images of ERc-containing tissues were obtained, including rabbit reproductive tract and dimethylbenzanthracene-induced tumors. The demonstrations of ERc selectivity and image formation both indicate that 16 alpha-[123I]E2 should have promise as a useful new radiopharmaceutical for imaging ERc-positive cancers.
    Cancer Research 01/1991; 50(24):7799-805. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two hundred and two patients with bone pain from metastatic cancer were treated with 40 microCi/kg of Sr-89. Patients were followed with pain diaries, records of medication taken, sleep patterns, serial bone scans and a Karnofsky Index. One hundred and thirty-seven patients with adequate followup survived at least 3 months, including 100 with prostate and 28 with breast carcinoma. Eighty of the 100 patients with prostate cancer responded, and 25 of the 28 breast cancer patients improved. Ten patients with prostate cancer and five with breast cancer became pain free. Little hematologic depression was noted. Sr-89 kinetic studies showed that strontium taken up in osteoblastic areas remained for 100 days. The tumor-to-marrow absorbed dose ratio was 10:1.
    Radiographics 04/1989; 9(2):271-81. DOI:10.1097/00003072-198809001-00018 · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have utilized 89Sr as palliative treatment for bone pain secondary to metastatic cancer in the skeleton of over 200 patients. The best results have been in patients with carcinoma of the prostate (80% response rate) and breast (89%). Results in a small number of patients with a variety of other cell types were not nearly as encouraging. Strontium-89 provides excellent palliation in the management of bone pain secondary to prostate and breast carcinoma.
    International Journal of Radiation Applications and Instrumentation Part B Nuclear Medicine and Biology 02/1987; 14(3):219-22. DOI:10.1016/0883-2897(87)90045-6
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    ABSTRACT: A radiobrominated compound, 4,5,6,7-tetrachloro-2′,4′,5′,7′-tetrabromofluorescein-77Br4 was prepared from resorcinol, tetrachlorophthallic anhydride and Na77Br by a two-step synthesis. The precursor was identified by spectrometry. Final purification utilized column chromatography. The product was identified by thin layer chromatography and spectrometry. The yield was 60% of theoretical.
    Journal of Labelled Compounds 01/1980; 17(1):73 - 80. DOI:10.1002/jlcr.2580170108
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    ABSTRACT: The biodistribution of a lipid-soluble brominated female sex hormone, Br-77-labeled estrone, has been determined in dogs and rabbits. Following i.v. or intragastric administration, Br-77-labeled estrone localized in the gallbladder bile within 20-25 min. Fifty-six percent of the injected activity was found in the bile at 90 min. Breast tissue was imaged by scintillation camera in three female dogs with postpartum breast enlargement at 24 hr following i.v. injection. Analysis of digitized images revealed 50% more counts per pixel in stimulated female breast tissue than was in surrounding tissue. Increased Br-77 activity in the breast was associated with the presence of increased concentrations of estrogen receptors.
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine 08/1979; 20(7):761-5. · 5.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Basic (pH 8.4) 99mTc penicillamine (TPEN) is an excellent agent forimaging renal functional morphology. The radiopharmaceutical development of this renal-scanning agent has progressed from daily, “on-demand”, preparation through a two-step kit with short shelf life to the presently reported rapid, one-step, freeze-dried kit, without loss of clinical effectiveness. Renal uptake is comparable to the earlier preparations, and the freeze-dried kit has a shelf life in excess of 2 months.
    The International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes 01/1978; 28(12):919-23. DOI:10.1016/0020-708X(77)90055-2
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    ABSTRACT: A kit for preparing basic (pH 8.4) 99mTc-penicillamine complex for renal studies is described. The radiopharmaceutical prepared from the kit localizes in the kidneys, primarily in the renal cortex. Data is presented which demonstrates that the kit method for 99mTc-penicillamine results in biological distribution of the 99mTc-penicillamine complex equivalent to that observed for the older extemporaneous method of preparation. The per cent of injected dose localized in the kidneys of rabbits at one hour is 18.3 ± 3.1%, which compares favorably with other 99mTc-complexes used for renal imaging.
    The International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes 01/1977; 28(1-2):105-12. DOI:10.1016/0020-708X(77)90164-8
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    ABSTRACT: The use of radiobromine as a label for radiopharmaceuticals was demonstrated by the synthesis of 82Br-2,4-dibromoesterone, using the procedure of Slaunwhite and Neely. Structure determination of the brominated steroid was accomplished by the use of melting point data, paper chromatoraphy and mass spectra analysis. Tissue distribution studies in animals demonstrated rapid blood clearance and excretion in the bile. Calculated radiation exposure dose for 77Br-2,4-dibromoestrone is less than 131I-Rose Bengal. A significant difference in tissue distribution was found when the data for 82Br-2,4-dibromoesterone was compared to literature values for 82Br-7,8-dibromoesterone. Comparison with 131I-Rose Bengal and 99mTc-pyrodoxylideneglutamate suggest 77Br-2,4-dibromoestrone would be a tracer of potential value for liver and gallbladder function studies.
    The International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes 01/1977; 28(1-2):163-8. DOI:10.1016/0020-708X(77)90170-3
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