Itaru Maruyama

Kissei Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Shonai, Nagano, Japan

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Publications (7)12.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We performed in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the pharmacological profile of ritobegron and its effects on the bladder in rats. β(3)-AR selectivity was assessed using CHO cells expressing various subtypes of the human β-adrenoceptor (AR). Effects on isolated organs were evaluated using the organ-bath method. Effects on intravesical pressure, heart rate, and mean blood pressure were evaluated in urethane-anesthetized rats. Ritobegron increased cAMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner in CHO cells expressing any one of three human β-AR, its selectivity for β(3)-AR being 301-fold and 32-fold higher versus β(1)-AR and β(2)-AR, respectively. Ritobegron decreased the resting tension of the isolated bladder in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50), 7.7 × 10(-8) mol/L; maximal relaxation, 97.0 %), and the β(3)-AR antagonist SR58894A produced a parallel rightward-shift of this concentration-response curve without altering the maximal response [pK(B) value, 6.43]. Ritobegron concentration-dependently increased atrial rate and decreased myometrial contractions in vitro, and its selectivity for the bladder was 2,078-fold higher versus the atria and 14-fold higher versus the uterus. In vivo, ritobegron induced a dose-dependent decrease in intravesical pressure (ED(50) 0.4 mg/kg), without affecting heart rate and only slightly lowering mean blood pressure. Thus, ritobegron displayed potent and selective β(3)-AR agonistic activity toward transfected human β-AR and exhibited a high selectivity for the bladder versus other organs in rats. Moreover, it decreased intravesical pressure with minimal effects on the cardiovascular system in anesthetized rats. These results suggest that ritobegron shows promise as a potential agent for the treatment of overactive bladder.
    Archiv für Experimentelle Pathologie und Pharmakologie 05/2012; 385(8):845-52. · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the pharmacological profile of ritobegron [KUC-7483; (-)-ethyl 2-[4-(2-{[(1S,2R)-2-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-methylethyl]amino}ethyl)-2,5-dimethylphenyloxy]acetate monohydrochloride] and its effects on the bladder in cynomolgus monkeys by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, ritobegron decreased the resting tension of the isolated bladder in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50) 8.2 ± 2.3 × 10(-7) M; maximal relaxation 88.7 ± 3.7%). The β(3)-adrenoceptor (AR) antagonist 3-(2-allylphenoxy)-1-[(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphth-1-ylamino]-(2S)-2-propanol hydrochloride (SR58894A) produced a rightward shift of this concentration-response curve without altering the maximal response (pK(B) value 6.56 ± 0.35). In isolated atria, ritobegron increased the atrial rate only at high concentrations (EC(50) 6.5 ± 1.2 × 10(-5) M). Ritobegron had no effect on tracheal contraction at concentrations from 10(-9) to 10(-4) M, and even at the highest concentration tested, 10(-3) M, the maximal relaxation it induced was only 26.7 ± 8.1%. Tests of the selectivity of ritobegron for the bladder gave values of 79.3- and 1200-fold higher versus atria and trachea, respectively. In the in vivo study ritobegron significantly decreased intravesical pressure (ED(50) 1.44 mg/kg) without affecting either mean blood pressure or heart rate. In conclusion, ritobegron displayed potent and selective β(3)-AR agonistic activity and relaxed the monkey isolated bladder, and in vivo it decreased intravesical pressure without affecting cardiovascular parameters. These results suggest that ritobegron may be a promising potential agent for the treatment of overactive bladder.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 04/2012; 342(1):163-8. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist ritobegron on rat bladder function following partial bladder outlet obstruction and on rat salivary secretion. In addition, the effects of ritobegron were compared with those of the anti-muscarinic agent tolterodine. After a 6-week partial bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), drug effects on bladder functions were evaluated using cystometrography. Effects on carbachol (CCh)-induced salivary secretion were evaluated in urethane-anesthetized rats. Ritobegron significantly decreased the frequency of non-voiding contractions (NVC), while both ritobegron and tolterodine each significantly decreased the amplitude of NVC. Ritobegron had no effect on either the micturition pressure (MP) or the residual volume (RV). In contrast, tolterodine dose-dependently decreased MP and increased RV. Ritobegron had no effect on CCh-induced salivary secretion, whereas tolterodine dose-dependently decreased it. Ritobegron decreased both the frequency and amplitude of NVC, which is similar to its effect on the contractions associated with detrusor overactivity (DO) in patients with an overactive bladder (OAB), without affecting MP, RV, or CCh-induced salivary secretion. Although tolterodine reduced the amplitude of NVC, it also markedly increased RV and significantly inhibited CCh-induced salivary secretion. These results suggest that use of ritobegron, a β3-AR agonist, is unlikely to lead to the residual urine and dry mouth symptoms that are associated with anti-muscarinic drugs, and that ritobegron may hold promise as a safe and effective agent for OAB treatment.
    Journal of smooth muscle research = Nihon Heikatsukin Gakkai kikanshi. 01/2012; 48(5-6):115-24.
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    ABSTRACT: The duration of action of Silodosin (KMD-3213) against the phenylephrine-induced increase in intraurethral pressure in urethane-anesthetized rats was compared with that of tamsulosin hydrochloride. Silodosin, tamsulosin, or vehicle was orally administered to fasted male rats. Then, under urethane anesthesia, a cannula was inserted into the prostatic urethra. Phenylephrine, at a dose of 30 microg/kg, was infused (infusion rate: 36 ml/h; infusion time: 100 s/kg) via the femoral vein at 12 h, 18 h, or 24 h after administration of the study drug, and the intraurethral pressure in the prostate region was measured. Although the plasma silodosin concentration would have resolved within a few hours, silodosin significantly inhibited the phenylephrine-induced increase in intraurethral pressure (versus the vehicle-treated group) at 12 h, 18 h, and 24 h after its oral administration (at doses of 100 microg/kg and above, 1000 microg/kg and above, and 3000 microg/kg, respectively). On the other hand, tamsulosin hydrochloride showed no inhibitory action at 24 h after its oral administration at doses up to 3000 microg/kg. Thus, silodosin inhibits the phenylephrine-induced increase in intraurethral pressure for a longer time than tamsulosin hydrochloride.
    Yakugaku zasshi journal of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan 04/2006; 126 Spec no.:231-6. · 0.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our aim was to compare the cardiovascular effects of mitiglinide ((+)-monocalcium bis[(2S,3a,7a-cis)-alpha-benzylhexahydro-gamma-oxo-2-isoindolinebutyrate] dehydrate), a novel hypoglycemic drug, with those of glibenclamide and glimepiride, two sulfonylurea drugs. In isolated canine coronary arteries (organ-bath method), mitiglinide, glibenclamide, and glimepiride competitively antagonized the cromakalim-induced relaxation (pA2 values, 5.29, 7.36, and 7.49, respectively). In isolated perfused rat hearts (Langendorff method) subjected to a 12-min global ischemia followed by a 30-min reperfusion, mitiglinide (3 x 10(-6) mol/l) altered neither the change in coronary perfusion flow nor the alterations in cardiac functions associated with reperfusion. In contrast, both glibenclamide (3 x 10(-8) mol/l) and glimepiride (1 x 10(-7) mol/l) significantly reduced coronary perfusion flow after reperfusion. Moreover, at 30 min of reperfusion: (1) glibenclamide induced a significant increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and significant decreases in left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, and the maximum first derivative of left ventricular pressure, while (2) glimepiride induced significant decreases in left ventricular developed pressure and the maximum first derivative of left ventricular pressure. Thus, the cardiovascular effects of mitiglinide (at least, in these rat and dog preparations) may be weaker than those of glibenclamide and glimepiride.
    European Journal of Pharmacology 03/2006; 531(1-3):194-200. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of silodosin, an alpha(1A)-adrenoceptor (AR) antagonist, and of other alpha(1)-AR antagonists on the phenylephrine (PE)-induced increase in intraurethral pressure (IUP) and on blood pressure (BP) were studied in anesthetized rats. The drugs were administered intravenously (i.v. study) or intraduodenally (i.d. study). IUP and BP were measured via catheters inserted into the prostatic urethra and common carotid artery, respectively. In the i.v. study, drugs were administered every 30 min for effects on BP, and 5 min before each PE-injection (30 microg/kg, every 60 min) with stepwise increases in dose for effects on IUP. In the i.d. study, one dose of drug was administered per rat, then IUP and BP were observed for 4 h [IUP being measured time-dependently following PE-injection (30 microg/kg)], and IUP and BP were expressed as a percentage of the values without any drugs. ID(50) for IUP and ED(15) for BP were calculated, and uroselectivity was determined as ED(15)/ID(50) for each drug. All drugs both inhibited the IUP increase and lowered BP, each effect being dose-dependent. The order of uroselectivities was silodosin (11.7)>tamuslosin (2.24)>naftopidil (0.133) in the i.v. study, and silodosin (26.0)>tamuslosin (3.82)>naftopidil (1.39) in the i.d. study. Selectivity for the lower urinary tract (LUT) was higher for silodosin than for tamsulosin (alpha(1A)/alpha(1D)-AR), naftopidil (alpha(1D)-AR), or prazosin (non-selective alpha(1)-AR). These results suggested that an alpha(1A)-AR selective antagonist like silodosin might be effective in the LUT without causing hypotension.
    Yakugaku zasshi journal of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan 03/2006; 126 Spec no.:217-23. · 0.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our main aim was to compare the prostatic selectivity of silodosin with that of other alpha(1)-adrenoceptor (AR) antagonists. We examined uroselectivities in two sets of experiments namely, in vitro and in vivo functional studies using male dogs. In the in vitro study, after evaluating the inhibitory effects of silodosin on noradrenaline (NA)-induced contractions in the isolated prostate and isolated carotid artery using the Magnus method, we calculated prostatic selectivity. In the in vivo study, we examined the effects of drugs on the hypogastric nerve stimulation (HNS)-induced increase in intraurethral pressure (IUP) and on blood pressure. The uroselectivity of silodosin was compared with those of tamsulosin and naftopidil. In vitro, all drugs antagonized NA-induced contraction in both prostate and carotid artery. The prostatic selectivity of silodosin (79.4) was much higher than those of tamsulosin (1.78), naftopidil (0.55), BMY 7378 (0.115), and prazosin (0.01). In vivo, intravenously (i.v.) administered silodosin dose-dependently inhibited the HNS-induced increase in IUP with much less hypotensive effect than either tamsulosin or naftopidil, the uroselectivity (ED(15)/ID(50)) of silodosin (237) being significantly higher than those of tamsulosin (1.21) and naftopidil (2.65). Our results clearly demonstrate that silodosin is a potent and highly selective alpha(1A)-AR antagonist. A selective alpha(1A)-AR antagonist such as silodosin may have good potential as a less-hypotensive drug for the treatment of urinary dysfunction in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients.
    Neurourology and Urodynamics 02/2006; 25(7):792-9; discussion 800-1. · 2.67 Impact Factor