I Fliss

Université du Québec, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (129)304.36 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Some probiotics (Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium) have contributed to prevent obesity and inflammation by improving intestinal barrier function with the decrease of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) circulation, by decreasing the liberation of pro-inflammatory metabolites such as cytokine (IL-6, TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO), and by increasing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). No dairy products containing anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity probiotics are currently available in North America. The viability of probiotic bacteria is important during the manufacture and storage of dairy products since cheese (30 g) and yogurt (100 g) must contain at least 109 of probiotic strain with health claims, according to the regulation of probiotic foods. The objective of this study was to determinate anti-inflammatory (in vitro) & anti-obesity (in vivo) effects of new probiotics and their viability during production and storage of low-fat yogurt and Cheddar cheese. New probiotic strains were isolated from infants or adults feces and dairy products. The use of 16S genetic identification and specific Q-PCR primers allowed confirming two Bifidobacterium animalis ssp lactis (Bf26, Bf141) and the use of RpoB primers three Lactobacillus strains (Lb38, Lb79, Lb102). Model cell of inflammation and model mice obese with milk as vector were used. The heat-killed of probiotic strains induced a significant decrease in NO production and were able to increase IL-10 production (except L79) in macrophages. The body weight gain of mice fed with high-fat high-sucrose (HFHS) diet treated with probiotic milks was significantly reduced comparing to mice fed with HFHS diet and milk without probiotic. Probiotic cells were viable (>109 cfu/g) in dairy products after the production and storage of low-fat yogurt and Cheddar cheese as recommended FDA. However, results obtained in vitro study suggests that death probiotic cells could play a role in anti-inflammatory effect. In the next study, some of these probiotic cheeses and yogurts will be use with model mice obese to determine their impact on anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity effect.
    Probiotics Summit, San Francisco, California, USA; 07/2015
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the compatibility among new probiotic strains isolated from dairy products or feces from human adults or infants and some commercial mesophilic and thermophilic starters was evaluated using automated spectrophotometry. The cell-free wheys made with commercial mesophilic and thermophilic starters significantly influenced the growth of the probiotic strains, whereas the cell-free wheys from the probiotic strains had little impact on the growth of the starters. Results also suggest that the type of thermophilic starters used, the presence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and the combination of lactococci have an influence on the growth of isolate strains. Therefore, it is important to choose appropriate starters that will not negatively affect probiotic bacteria during manufacturing and storage. Better compatibility between probiotic bacteria and starter bacteria will promote the survival of probiotics and improve taste and texture in the final product.
    International Dairy Journal 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.idairyj.2015.01.014
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    STELA 2015 Symposium, Quebec, Canada; 06/2015
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    ABSTRACT: Although the spread of human norovirus reportedly depends on its ability to bind to food materials, the mechanism of the phenomenon remains unknown. Since protein size and electrical charge are reportedly important parameters in their adsorption, the current work is focused on determining human noroviruses isoelectric point (IEP), electrical charge and aggregate size at different pH, ionic strength (IS), and temperature. Using the baculovirus expression vector system, we produced and purified virus-like particles (VLPs) of GI.1 and GII.4 noroviruses and feline calicivirus, determined their IEP, and examined their size and electrical charge using a Zetasizer Nano ZS apparatus. Shape and size were also visualized using transmission electron microscopy. IEPs were found close to pH 4. Net charge increased as the pH deviated from the IEP. VLPs were negatively charged at all IS tested and showed a gradual decrease in charge with increasing IS. At low temperature, VLPs were 20-45 nm in diameter at pH far from their IEP and under almost all IS conditions, while aggregates appeared at or near the IEP. At increased temperatures, aggregates appeared at or near the IEP and at high IS. Aggregation at the IEP was also confirmed by microscopy. This suggests that electrostatic interactions would be the predominant factor in VLPs adhesion at pH far from 4 and at low ionic strength. In contrast, non-electrostatic interactions would prevail at around pH 4 and would be reinforced by aggregates, since size generally favors multiple bonding with sorbents.
    Food and Environmental Virology 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s12560-015-9198-0
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    ABSTRACT: Proteins from fish by-product sources are valuable source of bioactive peptides and show promise as functional foods ingredients. The objective of the present study was to isolate and characterize antibacterial peptides from protamex hydrolysates of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) by-products. Four sequences SIFIQRFTT (P4), RKSGDPLGR (P8.1), AKPGDGAGSGPR (P8.2) and GLPGPLGPAGPK (P11) were identified in peptide fractions separated using RP-HPLC. At 200 μg mL(-1), while peptides P8.1, P8.2 and P11 exhibited partial inhibition, P4 totally inhibited tested Gram-positive (Listeria innocua) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains. These results suggest that the protein hydrolysate derived from mackerel by-products could be used as an antimicrobial ingredient in both functional food and nutraceutical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 04/2015; 462(3). DOI:10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.04.091
  • Allison Vimont, Ismaïl Fliss, Julie Jean
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    ABSTRACT: Pulsed light is a non-thermal processing technology recognized by the FDA for killing microorganisms on food surfaces, with cumulative fluences up to 12 J cm(-2). In this study, we investigated its efficacy for inactivating murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) as human norovirus surrogate in PBS buffer, hard water, mineral water, turbid water and sewage treatment effluent and on food-contact surfaces including high-density polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride and stainless steel, free or in an alginate matrix. The pulsed light device emitted a broadband spectrum (200-1000 nm) at a fluence of 0.67 J cm(-2) per pulse with 2 % UV at 8 cm beneath the lamp. Reductions in viral infectivity exceeded 3 log10 in less than 3 seconds (5 pulses, 3.45 J cm(-2)) in clear suspensions and on clean surfaces even in the presence of alginate, and in 6 seconds (11 pulses, 7.60 J cm(-2)) on fouled surfaces except for stainless steel (2.6 log10). The presence of protein or bentonite interfered with viral inactivation. Analysis of the morphology, the viral proteins and the RNA integrity of the treated MNV-1 allowed us to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the antiviral activity of pulsed light. Pulsed light appeared to disrupt MNV-1 structure and degrade viral protein and RNA. The results suggest that pulsed light technology could provide effective alternative means of inactivating noroviruses in wastewaters, in clear beverages, in drinking water or food-handling surfaces in the presence or absence of biofilms. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 02/2015; DOI:10.1128/AEM.03840-14
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    ABSTRACT: Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is an antibacterial peptide with a peculiar molecular structure consisting of 21 amino acids and a unique lasso topology that makes it highly stable. We synthesized various MccJ25-derived peptides that retained some of the inhibitory activity of the native molecule against Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. Of the tested peptides, C1, 7-21C and WK_7-21 were the most inhibitory peptides (MIC = 1-250 µM), but all three were less potent than MccJ25. While MccJ25 was not active against Gram-positive bacteria, the three derived peptides were slightly inhibitory to Gram-positive bacteria (MIC ≥ 250 µM). At 5 µM, C1, 7-21C and WK_7-21 reduced E. coli RNA polymerase activity by respectively, 23.4, 37.4 and 65.0 %. The MccJ25 and its derived peptides all appeared to affect the respiratory apparatus of S. enterica. Based on circular dichroism and FTIR spectroscopy, the peptides also interact with bacterial membrane phospholipids. These results suggest the possibility of producing potent MccJ25-derived peptides lacking the lasso structure.
    Amino Acids 12/2014; 47(2). DOI:10.1007/s00726-014-1877-x
  • Allison Vimont, Ismaïl Fliss, Julie Jean
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of four different peroxyacids, namely peracetic (PAA), perpropionic (PPA), perlactic (PLA), and percitric (PCA) for inactivating viruses in suspension or attached to stainless steel or polyvinyl chloride surfaces. The test virus was a proxy for human norovirus, namely murine norovirus 1. Plaque-forming units in suspension (10(7) per mL) were treated with 50-1,000 mg L(-1) peroxyacid (equilibrium mixture of organic acid, hydrogen peroxide, peroxyacid, and water) for 1-10 min. Inactivation was measured by plaque assay. PAA and PPA were the most effective, with a 5 min treatment at 50 mg L(-1) being sufficient to reduce viral titer by at least 3.0 log10, whether the virus was in suspension or attached to stainless steel or polyvinyl chloride disks under clean or fouled conditions. Combinations of organic acid and hydrogen peroxide were found ineffective. Similar inactivation was observed in the case of virus in artificial biofilm (alginate gel). These short super-oxidizers could be used for safe inactivation of human noroviruses in water or on hard surfaces.
    Food and Environmental Virology 11/2014; 7(1). DOI:10.1007/s12560-014-9174-0
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have shown that, the ingestion of specific probiotics (Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium) can reduce the metabolic syndrome in humans due to their anti-inflammatory effects. No cheeses containing anti-inflammatory probiotics are currently available in Canada. In order to show beneficial effects, probiotics must maintain good viability during the production and ripening of cheese. The objective of this study was to successfully incorporate new probiotic isolates strains with anti-inflammatory effects in low fat Cheddar cheese. Three Lactobacillus and two Bifidobacterium strains isolated from infants or adults feces were selected. These strains were identified by 16S genetic identification, the lactis subspecis of Bifidobacterium animalis were confirmed by specific Q-PCR primers and the subspecis of Lactobacillus strains were confirmed by RpoB primers. The anti-inflammatory effects of these new isolate strains were evaluated in vitro using murine macrophage cell line J774.1. The production of each of the pro-inflammatory nitric oxide (NO) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) were determined in presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To evaluate the impact of process parameters on the viability of the probiotics, the five probiotic strains were used in the production of cheese. Potential probiotic strains induced significant decrease in NO production in both basal and LPS-stimulated macrophages and were able to increase IL-10 production by macrophages. Cheese composition was similar, whatever the type of probiotic isolate strains used. During cheese production, the viability of some isolated strains was more affected during the cooking and/or salting steps. During the ripening, the viability of bifidobacteria was more affected than lactobacilli. The viability of lactococci was dependant of the type of probiotic strain used during the production. In the next study, some of these cheeses will be tested in vivo on mice to determine survival of probiotics into gastro-intestinal transit and their anti-inflammatory effect.
    International Union of Microbiological Societies Congresses (IUMS 2014), Montréal, Québec.; 08/2014
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of fatty acids on the growth of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria was studied to gain insight into the beneficial effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and probiotics. Milk was enriched with CLA by adding 4% safflower oil to the cow diet, by emulsifying synthetic CLA as free fatty acids, or by emulsifying CLA as triacylglycerol, then adjusted to 1.0% or 3.25% fat and digested in a gastro-intestinal simulator. The residual fatty acid contents of milk samples containing initial fat contents of 1.0% and 3.25% were significantly different after 6 h digestion. Milk enriched with synthetic CLA and adjusted to 1.0% fat appeared to provide a digest that allowed growth of both Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011 and Lb. rhamnosus LGG; adjustment to 3.25% fat decreased viable LGG slightly. Digestion of milk containing 3.25% fat appeared to yield a residual fatty acid mixture that may be slightly bactericidal or simply bacteriostatic.
    International Dairy Journal 07/2014; 37(1). DOI:10.1016/j.idairyj.2014.02.006
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    ABSTRACT: The intestinal absorption of fatty acids from milk, especially conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), was evaluated using an in vitro simulator. Milk was enriched with c9,t11 CLA by feeding a cow a diet containing 4% safflower oil or by emulsifying synthetic CLA in the form of free fatty acid or triacylglycerol, then standardized to 1.0% or 3.25% fat. Fatty acid bioavailability depended on chain length, presence of double bonds, and the percentage of fat. Absorption was more efficient in the presence of 1.0% fat. The bioavailability of c9,t11 CLA at 3.25% fat was 89% in the milk from the cow fed the safflower oil diet, and 85% and 71% in milk enriched with synthetic free CLA and synthetic CLA in the form of triacylglycerol, respectively. At 1.0% fat, these values were 90%, 99% and 96%, respectively, suggesting that bioavailability of CLA in milk is affected by the percentage of fat present.
    International Dairy Journal 06/2014; 36(2). DOI:10.1016/j.idairyj.2014.01.009
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    ABSTRACT: Dairy products are considered as a good carrier for probiotics. In addition, they have a positive image (healthy, natural) for consumers. Even though some probiotics are commercially available, dairy industries are always interested to find and use new probiotics with new functional properties. However, before using these new probiotics, it is important to characterize genetically strains and determine their technological properties. Several molecular tools have been proposed for species identification and strains differentiation. In this study, four new strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis were isolated and identified by 16S genetic identification. Thereafter, specific Q-PCR primers were used to confirm the lactis subspecies. Then RAPD-PCR was used with random primers OPA-16 (5’ AGG TTG CAG G 3’), OPA-18 (5’ AGG TGA CCG T 3’) and P15 (5’ CTG GGC ACG T’3) to differentiate these new bifidobacteria. The technological properties of these four strains were also determined and compared by following their growth in milk (test of Pearce), during cheese ripening (cheese slurry) and in presence of some lactococcal strains (automated spectrophotometry test). The RAPD profiles for all strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis were very similar. However, the growth in milk, in cheese slurries and in presence of lactococcal strains was different for every strain of B. animalis ssp. lactis. The results indicate that it is important to evaluate the technological capacities of probiotics even if their RAPD profiles are similar.
    Colloque Probio2014, Montréal, Quebec; 05/2014
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal activities of water-soluble extracts (WSEs) from different types of cheeses against several food-borne pathogens. A total of five commercial cheeses manufactured in Canada were selected namely Mozzarella, Gouda, Swiss, and old and medium Cheddar. WSEs were ultrafiltrated through 10 kDa cutoff membranes and desalted using Sep-Pak cleanup column. Resulting peptide fractions were subject to physicochemical characterization and assessment for their antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Listeria ivanovii, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli MC4100, and E. coli O157:H7) and filamentous fungi (Aspergillus, Mucor, Fusarium, and Penicillium). Mozzarella and Gouda WSEs were the most active and inhibited with L. monocytogenes significantly, with respective reductions of 3.83 ± 0.15 and 2.93 ± 0.33 log. After desalting and organic acids removal, Mozzarella and Gouda WSEs produced 3-log reductions of L. ivanovii and E. coli MC4100, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging 8.5–17 mg.mL−1. At a concentration of 34 mg.mL−1, all cheese peptidic WSEs induced a delay in spore germination. All WSEs were equally active against Fusarium sp., with a minimal concentration of 17 mg.mL−1. Gouda, Mozzarella, and medium Cheddar WSE were the strongest inhibitors in the case of Aspergillus versicolor and Mucor racemosus (17 mg.mL−1), whereas these spores were less sensitive to old Cheddar and Swiss WSE (34 mg.mL−1). This study demonstrates that peptidic WSEs of commercial cheeses manufactured in Canada exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activities, which may offer a promising alternative for purposes of food preservation.
    Dairy Science and Technology 04/2014; DOI:10.1007/s13594-014-0170-9
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to isolate new bacteriocinogenic strains with putative probiotic potential from various Tunisian fermented milks. A total of 44 Gram-positive catalase-negative isolates were colony-purified and screened for antimicrobial activity. Of inhibitory isolates, four were identified as Enterococcus durans and one as Enterococcus faecalis using 16S rRNA gene sequence. The five strains were sensitive to penicillin G, all aminoglycosides tested, to the vancomycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol, and E. durans 42G and E. faecalis 61B were resistant to erythromycin. The antimicrobial substances were sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and had good biochemical stability. E. durans 61A showed a good resistance to gastric and small intestinal secretions, but were more sensitive to the duodenal conditions. Considering the safety and the stability under simulated gastrointestinal tract, it appears that the bacteriocinogenic strain E. durans 61A is a good candidate for its application as novel probiotic strain in the food industry.
    Archives of Microbiology 03/2014; 196(5). DOI:10.1007/s00203-014-0978-y
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    ABSTRACT: The number of identified and characterized bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins is increasing. Although many antimicrobial peptides of dairy origin are now well known, important structural and functional information is still missing or unavailable to potential users. The compilation of such information in one centralized resource such as a database would facilitate the study of the potential of these peptides as natural alternatives for food preservation or to help thwart antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. To achieve this goal, we established MilkAMP, a new database that contains valuable information on antimicrobial peptides of dairy origin, including microbiological and physicochemical data. The current release of MilkAMP contains 371 entries, including 9 hydrolysates, 299 antimicrobial peptides, 23 peptides predicted as antimicrobial, and 40 non-active peptides. Freely available at http://milkampdb.org/, this database should be useful to help develop uses of biologically active peptides in both the pharmaceutical and food sectors. As more information about antimicrobial peptides becomes available, the database will be expanded and improved accordingly.
    Dairy Science and Technology 03/2014; 94(2). DOI:10.1007/s13594-013-0153-2
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    ABSTRACT: Milk proteins are a valuable source of bioactive peptides encrypted within primary amino acid sequences and released upon enzymatic hydrolysis during gastrointestinal transit or food processing. A growing number of such peptides are being identified in dairy protein hydrolysates and fermented dairy products. Some of these peptides have been shown to possess opioid, immunomodulatory, antimicrobial, antithrombotic, growth-stimulating, or antihypertensive properties. Particularly, dairy antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an attractive alternative to satisfy consumer demands for safe, ready-to-eat, extended shelf life, fresh-tasting, and minimally processed foods, without chemical additives. Besides, the use of this category of antimicrobial agents as alternatives or adjuncts to help alleviate the current problem of antibiotic overuse and resistance may now be seriously envisaged by the pharmaceutical industry. This review focuses on bioactivity and modes of action of milk-derived AMPs and their in situ role, on use of chemical engineering for enhancement of their activities, and on their potential applications in pharmaceutical products and food systems.
    Food Reviews International 02/2014; 30(2):null. DOI:10.1080/87559129.2014.896017
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of newly synthesized triaryl butene analogues of tamoxifen. Several compounds were synthesized and converted to citrate salts to ensure greater solubility. Four compounds showed significant antibacterial activity at micromolar concentrations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative foodborne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria ivanovii, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Two compounds at 50 μM, caused only 7.8 and 11% hemolysis. One of these as well as the remaining two caused high K+ and Na+ efflux from bacterial cells. Ultrastructural alterations were also visible using transmission electron microscopy, which revealed severe damage of the inner or outer membrane of E. coli. L. ivanovii showed swelling, corrugations and similar damage indicating a loss of cell-wall integrity. Organometallic compounds may offer interesting opportunities for the design of novel classes of antimicrobial compounds.
    European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 02/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.ejmech.2014.02.037
  • Allison Vimont, Ismaïl Fliss, Julie Jean
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    ABSTRACT: Foodborne viruses such as noroviruses have become a huge food safety concern, being responsible for more than half of all foodborne illnesses. The high prevalence of foodborne viruses in the food sector may be related to several factors such as their high persistence in the environment and in foods, as well as their low infectious dose. Even if a treatment reduces an initial viral load of 5 log10 by 1000-fold, residual unaffected virions (0.01%) may be sufficient to cause illness. Minimally processed foods such as bivalve molluscs and fresh produce are frequently involved in the transmission of foodborne viruses to humans. This chapter provides an update of the recent findings relating to the inactivation of foodborne viruses using physical and chemical approaches. In addition to traditional methods using heat or chemical compounds such as chlorine and organic acids, innovative technologies such as high-pressure, pulsed light and irradiation as well as ozone or peroxyacid treatments are presented.
    Practical Food Safety: Contemporary Issues and Future Directions, Edited by Rajeev Bhat, Vicente M. Gómez-López, 01/2014: chapter 23: pages 471-495; John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., ISBN: 978-1-118-47460-0
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work is to study the expression of stress genes and those involved in pediocin and nisin production in Pediococcus acidilactici UL5 and Lactococcus lactis ATCC11454 under simulated gastrointestinal (GI) physiological conditions. The two strains were fed to a dynamic GI model (TIM-1). Samples were taken from different compartments and analysed for strain survival as well as for the expression of pediocin PA-1 operon, nisin A production gene and stress genes using RT-qPCR. Ileal-delivered efflux showed a survival rate of 17 and 0·0007% for Ped. acidilactici and La. lactis, respectively. Pediocin operon genes from stressed cells were generally expressed at least at the same level as for unstressed cells. However, pedA is up-regulated in the effluent at 120 and 180 min. Nisin A genes were always up-regulated with particularly in the stomach after 70 min compared with control. Bacteriocin production of Ped. acidilactici UL5 and Lc. lactis ATCC 11454 are not affected by upper GI simulated conditions and thus could be considered as relevant probiotic candidates. This study demonstrates the capacity of lactic acid bacteria to survive and express their bacteriocins genes under simulated GI conditions.
    Journal of Applied Microbiology 11/2013; DOI:10.1111/jam.12391
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    ABSTRACT: The efficacy of an anionic peptides-enriched extract (APEE), produced by nanofiltration of a tryptic hydrolysate from whey proteins, to inhibit the growth of Listeria innocua and Listeria monocytogenes in reconstituted Cheddar cheese was studied. The antimicrobial activity of APEE in reconstituted cheese was greater against L. monocytogenes than L. innocua and was higher in storage at 30 �C than at 4 �C. The combination of 20 mg g�1 of APEE and 1.75% salt/moisture (S/M) in cheeses incubated for 7 days at 30 �C was the most efficient condition to inhibit the growth of Listeria. Using these conditions, L. monocytogenes counts were significantly reduced by 1.1 and 1.5 log cfu g�1, compared with cheeses without APEE and prepared with lactococci at 1.75 and 3.5% S/M, respectively. These results suggest that antimicrobial anionic peptides from whey proteins can contribute to control pathogen in reduced-salt Cheddar cheeses.
    International Dairy Journal 09/2013; 32:6-12. DOI:10.1016/j.idairyj.2013.03.008

Publication Stats

2k Citations
304.36 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1993–2015
    • Université du Québec
      Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
  • 1991–2015
    • Laval University
      • • Department of Food and Nutrition Sciences
      • • Institute of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods (INAF)
      Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
  • 2007–2008
    • Alexandria University
      • Department of Dairy Science and Technology
      Al Iskandarīyah, Alexandria, Egypt
  • 2004
    • Eawag: Das Wasserforschungs-Institut des ETH-Bereichs
      Duebendorf, Zurich, Switzerland
  • 1993–1999
    • Centre d'enseignement et de recherche en foresterie de Sainte-Foy
      Québec, Quebec, Canada
  • 1997
    • Université du Québec à Montréal
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 1995
    • University of Manitoba
      • Department of Food Science
      Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada