Heather Beanlands

Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle-on-the-Saale, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

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Publications (28)38.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Person-centered care (PCC) is grounded in principles of respect, autonomy, and empowerment and requires the development of interpersonal relationships. For nursing students to engage in PCC, they need to intentionally develop personal knowing, which is an essential attribute of therapeutic relationships. Developing personal knowing, as well as professional knowledge, positions students to enact PCC in their practice. Faculty members play a vital role in fostering the development of personal knowing by creating opportunities for students in which genuine and respectful dialogue, reflection, self-awareness, and critical thinking can take place. This article explores several creative approaches faculty have used to actualize these qualities in their teaching-learning encounters with nursing students at various stages of their students' professional development. These approaches offer experiential teaching-learning opportunities that foster the development of personal knowing, as well as constructive and respectful relationships between faculty and students, therefore laying the groundwork for PCC in practice settings. [J Nurs Educ. 2014;53(X):xx-xx.].
    The Journal of nursing education. 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Faculty development that builds research capacity is a significant yet challenging expectation in academia. The School of Nursing faculty at Ryerson University established several research clusters to support research collaborations and productivity. This article explicates one cluster's development process, and specifically, its adoption of the narrative reflective process (NRP). Engaging in NRP permitted the group to creatively enter into critical dialogue, address both individual and collective needs, and establish a supportive environment that nurtures the creative process—all of which ultimately enhances scholarship and academic productivity.
    Creative Nursing 01/2014; 20(3).
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the views and current practice of SMBG among Black Caribbean and South Asian individuals with non-insulin treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Twelve participants completed semi-structured interviews that were guided by the Health Belief Model and analyzed using thematic network analysis. The frequency of monitoring among participants varied from several times a day to once per week. Most participants expressed similar experiences regarding their views and practices of SMBG. Minor differences across gender and culture were observed. All participants understood the benefits, but not all viewed SMBG as beneficial to their personal diabetes management. SMBG can facilitate a better understanding and maintenance of self-care behaviours. However, it can trigger both positive and negative emotional responses, such as a sense of disappointment when high readings are not anticipated, resulting in emotional distress. Health care professionals play a key role in the way SMBG is perceived and used by patients. While the majority of participants value SMBG as a self-management tool, barriers exist that impede its practice, particularly its cost. How individuals cope with these barriers is integral to understanding why some patients adopt SMBG more than others.
    BMC Endocrine Disorders 10/2013; 13(1):46. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Management of a chronic medical condition is a complex process and requires coordinated action between healthcare providers and patients. This process is further complicated by the fact that an increasing number of patients suffer from multiple chronic conditions. Self-management involves active participation of the patients in the everyday care of the symptoms of their illness(es) and medical treatments, as well as maintaining general health and prevention of progression of medical conditions. Managing the psychosocial consequences of illness is also an important component of self-management. Data have demonstrated that enhancing self-management improves quality of life, coping, symptom management, disability, and reduces healthcare expenditures and service utilization. To foster self-management, potential barriers to implementation as well as facilitators and supports for this approach must be acknowledged. In this article, we review various aspects of self-management in chronic illness, focusing on chronic kidney disease. Better understanding of these concepts will facilitate patient-provider collaboration, improve patient care with increased patient and staff satisfaction, and may ultimately result in better clinical outcomes and enhanced quality of life for both the patients and their families.
    Seminars in Dialysis 03/2013; 26(2):188-94. · 2.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Person-centred practice indubitably seems to be the antithesis of technology. The ostensible polarity of technology and person-centred practice is an easy road to travel down and in their various forms has been probably travelled for decades if not centuries. By forging ahead or enduring these dualisms, we continue to approach and recede, but never encounter the elusive and the liminal space between technology and person-centred practice. Inspired by Haraway's work, we argue that healthcare practitioners who critically consider their cyborg ontology may begin the process to initiate and complicate the liminal and sought after space between technology and person-centred practice. In this paper, we draw upon Haraway's idea that we are all materially and ontologically cyborgs. Cyborgs, the hybridity of machine and human, are part of our social reality and embedded in our everyday existence. By considering our cyborg ontology, we suggest that person-centred practice can be actualized in the contextualized, embodied and relational spaces of technology. It is not a question of espousing technology or person-centred practice. Such dualisms have been historically produced and reproduced over many decades and prevented us from recognizing our own cyborg ontology. Rather, it is salient that we take notice of our own cyborg ontology and how technological, habitual ways of being may prevent (and facilitate) us to recognize the embodied and contextualized experiences of patients. A disruption and engagement with the habitual can ensure we are not governed by technology in our logics and practices of care and can move us to a conscious and critical integration of person-centred practice in the technologized care environments. By acknowledging ourselves as cyborgs, we can recapture and preserve our humanness as caregivers, as well as thrive as we proceed in our technological way of being.
    Nursing Philosophy 10/2012; 13(4):276-88. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The tradition of inherent knowledge and power of health care providers stands in stark contrast to the principles of self-determination and patient participation in patient-centered care. At the organizational level, patient-centered care is a merging of patient education, self-care, and evidence-based models of practice and consists of 4 broad domains of intervention including communication, partnerships, health promotion, and physical care. As a result of the unexamined discourse of knowledge and power in health care, the possibilities of patient-centered care have not been fully achieved. In this article, we used a critical social theory lens to examine the discursive influence of power upon the integration of patient-centered care into health care organizations. We begin with an overview of patient-centered care, followed by a discussion of the various ways that it has been introduced into health care organizations. We proceed by deconstructing the inherent power and knowledge of health care providers and shed light on how these long-standing traditions have impeded the integration of patient-centered care. We conclude with a discussion of viable solutions that can be used to implement patient-centered care into health care organizations. This article presents a perspective through which the integration of patient-centered care into health organizations can be examined.
    Quality management in health care 07/2012; 21(3):127-34.
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    ABSTRACT: South Asian (SA) immigrant women in Canada are at greater risk of contracting and dying from heart disease than their white Canadian counterparts. Low levels of physical activity (PA), a modifiable risk factor for heart disease, have been reported in the SA community. This study investigated the acceptability of culturally specific dance in enhancing SA women's engagement in PA. Two focus group sessions were held, involving a total of 16 SA women. Participants reported limited knowledge about the overall health benefits of PA. Chief barriers to PA were lack of time and motivation. Dancing was considered the most enjoyable PA, which could burn calories and act as a social outlet. Participants indicated that despite their community's diversity, a “women-only dance class” led by a community female dance instructor, combined with childcare services, would be acceptable.
    Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies 04/2012; 10(2):139-161.
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    ABSTRACT: Street-involved youth experience a range of mental health problems with elevated rates of psychiatric disorders compared with non-homeless youth. The overall objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the impact of a relationship-based intervention for homeless youth receiving services from agencies in downtown Toronto. The final sample included 15 homeless youth who met the study inclusion criteria. The intervention and comparison groups were compared at baseline and post-treatment on measures of mental health symptoms, hopelessness, self-esteem, resilience, and social connectedness. Participants receiving the intervention demonstrated a significant improvement in social connectedness, with a trend toward decreased hopelessness. Those participants who did not receive the intervention did not demonstrate any improvements in social connectedness and hopelessness. This preliminary pilot study suggests that providing a relationship-based intervention to street-involved youth may offer promise to strengthen social relationships and to mitigate overwhelming hopelessness and despair.
    Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing 11/2011; 24(4):208-15.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to develop a norm-referenced tool that would measure the self-care abilities and behaviours for adults requiring dialysis therapy. Guided by the Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (Orem, 2001) and an extensive review of the research literature, the Lay Care Giving for Adults on Dialysis tool (LC-GAD) (Horsburgh, Laing, Beanlands, Meng, & Harwood, 2008) was modified to develop the Self-Care for Adults on Dialysis (SCAD) measure. Content validity testing of the SCAD was conducted by a panel of 13 nephrology nursing experts. The tool was modified based on study findings. Further psychometric testing is required. When completed the SCAD tool will guide nurses to design and evaluate supportive self-care interventions for adults requiring dialysis.
    CANNT journal = Journal ACITN 01/2011; 21(2):38-43.
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    ABSTRACT: The social environments and activities of homeless youth frequently create a downward spiral, leading to drug abuse and survival sex as well as self-harm behaviours and suicidality. This study employed a mixed-methods approach to assess the mental health challenges and strengths of street-involved youth. A convenience sample of 70 homeless young people completed a series of standardized questionnaires evaluating mental health symptoms as well as resilience and self-esteem. Two focus groups were also held to capture the perceived mental health needs of street-involved youth. These young people (aged 16-24) were found to have high levels of mental health symptoms compared to other groups of young adults. However, they also exhibited moderately high levels of resilience and self-esteem. Therefore, multi-component mental health programs and interventions that address both strengths and challenges may well help street-involved youth to work towards social re-integration and, ultimately, improved quality of life.
    The Canadian journal of nursing research = Revue canadienne de recherche en sciences infirmières 09/2010; 42(3):30-49.
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    ABSTRACT: The social environments and activities of homeless youth frequently create a downward spiral, leading to drug abuse and survival sex as well as self-harm behaviours and suicidality. This study employed a mixed-methods approach to assess the mental health challenges and strengths of street-involved youth. A convenience sample of 70 homeless young people completed a series of standardized questionnaires evaluating mental health symptoms as well as resilience and self-esteem. Two focus groups were also held to capture the perceived mental health needs of street-involved youth. These young people (aged 16-24) were found to have high levels of mental health symptoms compared to other groups of young adults. However, they also exhibited moderately high levels of resilience and self-esteem. Therefore, multi-component mental health programs and interventions that address both strengths and challenges may well help street-involved youth to work towards social re-integration and, ultimately, improved quality of life. French Les activités sociales des jeunes sans-abri et les milieux qu'ils fréquentent entraînent souvent un mode de vie nocif menant à la toxicomanie, au sexe de survie, à des comportements autodestructeurs et à des tendances suicidaires. Dans le cadre de cette étude, une approche à méthodes mixtes a été utilisée pour évaluer les défis et les forces chez les jeunes vivant dans la rue, sur le plan de la santé mentale. Un échantillon de commodité composé de 70 jeunes sans-abri a répondu à une sér ie de questionnaires normalisés, lesquels visaient à évaluer l'état de santé mentale, la résilience et l'estime de soi de ces jeunes. Les chercheurs ont aussi tenu deux groupes de discussion avec pour but de cerner les perceptions qu'ont les jeunes vivant dans la rue quant à leurs besoins en santé mentale. L'étude a révélé chez cette population (âgée de 16 à 24 ans) d'importants taux de troubles mentaux, comparativement à d'autres groupes de jeunes adultes. Toutefois, ces jeunes affichaient des taux de résilience et d'estime de soi modérément élevés. Par conséquent, la mise en place de programmes et d'interventions en santé mentale tenant compte à la fois des forces et des défis pourraient aider les jeunes vivant dans la rue, dans leur démarche pour réintégrer la société et, en bout de ligne, améliorer leur qualité de vie.
    The Canadian journal of nursing research = Revue canadienne de recherche en sciences infirmières 08/2010; 42(3):30-49.
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    ABSTRACT: Limited research has examined the specific approach, mode of delivery, and dose of educational interventions. Yet such knowledge is essential to develop effective heart failure educational interventions. The intent of this systematic review was to determine what approach, mode, and dose is most effective in producing changes in heart failure patient education. The sample included 69 studies involving 1865 study participants. Findings indicate the most effective means for delivery heart failure patient education is through the individualization of content, the use of combined mediums for delivery, provision of education on a one-on-one basis, and in multiple sessions. These results highlight the need to redesign current heart failure patient education initiatives to enhance patient outcomes.
    European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing 10/2009; 9(1):30-7. · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Lay Care-Giving for Adults Receiving Dialysis (LC-GAD) was developed using qualitative and quantitative approaches to systematically measure the breadth and quantity of caregiver activities. The reliability and validity of these evaluations was tested on a sample of 447 Canadian family members and friends who cared for adults on dialysis. Factor analysis was performed independently assessing two components. The first measured the abstract, cognitive work of care-giving (Think-LC-GAD) which included the subscales of appraisal, advocating, coaching, juggling and routinizing. These five factors explained two-thirds of the total variance of the Think-LC-GAD. The second component measured the concrete tasks of care-giving (Task-LC-GAD) which included providing transportation, performing dialysis, personal hygiene, diet, symptom relief, comfort measures and teaching self-care. These seven factors explained seven-eights of the total variance in the Task-LCGAD. Test-retest reliability of these two components had significant correlation coefficients. The validity of the Think- and Task-LC-GADs showed positive correlations between themselves and the perceived burden of care-giving, the trait of conscientiousness and self-reported self-care abilities.
    Kidney International 08/2008; 74(2):230-6. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the impact of one person's dietary change on the experiences of a significant other with whom they regularly shared meals. Qualitative constant comparison approach using semistructured interviews. Community-based. Forty-two participants were recruited using a stratified purposive sampling strategy. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed using NUD*IST, version 4.0 software (Qualitative Solutions and Research, Melbourne, Australia, 1997) and manual coding. Most dietary changers had modified their diets in response to a disease diagnosis (eg, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, hypoglycemia, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), ulcer, allergies). Others had changed their diets for personal reasons (eg, weight loss, vegetarian diets). The dietary changes included dietary fat reduction, conversion to vegetarian or vegan diets, restriction of total kilocalorie intake, and elimination or reduction of specific food items. Significant others described a range of emotional responses to the dietary change, including cooperation, encouragement, skepticism, and anger. Significant others' descriptions of the roles that they played in the dietary change were positive (enabling), neutral (neither enabling nor inhibiting), or negative (inhibiting). Most significant others played positive roles; few played neutral or negative roles. Understanding dietary change from the perspective of significant others can enable nutrition professionals to develop strategies to promote dietary modifications as a shared activity.
    Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 03/2008; 40(2):80-8. · 1.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Young people coping with first episode schizophrenia may be predisposed to illness engulfment whereby the illness entirely defines self-concept. They require psychosocial intervention to preserve an identity distinct from illness, promote hopefulness, and minimise the impact of stigma, enabling them to embrace a healthy sense of self and an optimistic future. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a group intervention designed to promote healthy self-concepts by reducing self-stigmatisation and engulfment among young adults recovering from first episode schizophrenia. Participants at two first episode psychosis clinics, one in Toronto and one in Ottawa, were assigned to one of two groups: intervention plus treatment as usual, or a control with only treatment as usual. A repeated measures analysis revealed that immediately post-intervention, the treatment group significantly improved on engulfment, hope, and quality of life measures compared with the control. No improvement was observed in self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and stigma. Intervening early in the course of the illness to address engulfment and self-stigmatisation may enable young people to acquire positive attitudes toward themselves and the future. Future longitudinal data are needed to determine whether this intervention will prevent the development of chronicity and demoralisation over time.
    Advances in Mental Health 12/2007; 6(3).
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    Heather Beanlands, Elizabeth McCay, Janet Landeen
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    ABSTRACT: Although the literature suggests that loss of self is a universal concern across chronic illnesses in general, little consideration has been given to loss of self across physical and mental illnesses. The authors compare loss of self in individuals with a mental illness (early schizophrenia) and in those with a physical illness (chronic kidney disease). In this secondary analysis, focus group data from 2 samples are examined for similarities and differences in the emergent themes. While striving to be my best self getting on with life was an overarching goal for both groups, the strategies for achieving it differed. The participants engaged in activities related to approaching the illness, accommodating, and connecting in order to strike a balance between the demands of the illness and non-illness aspects of their lives. The commonalities in the wish to be my best self that were found in both groups indicate that the wish to preserve a sense of self beyond the illness may not be illness-specific. The preliminary results of this secondary analysis suggest that building a positive sense of self in the face of illness is a critical part of illness adjustment and that there are opportunities for nurses and researchers to learn about the spectrum of strategies employed by individuals as they strive to move beyond the illness.
    The Canadian journal of nursing research = Revue canadienne de recherche en sciences infirmières 10/2006; 38(3):10-30.
  • Heather Beanlands, Elizabeth McCay, Janet Landeen
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    ABSTRACT: Although the literature suggests that loss of self is a universal concern across chronic illnesses in general, little consideration has been given to loss of self across physical and mental illnesses. The authors compare loss of self in individuals with a mental illness (early schizophrenia) and in those with a physical illness (chronic kidney disease). In this secondary analysis, focus group data from 2 samples are examined for similarities and differences in the emergent themes. While striving to be my best self: getting on with life was an overarching goal for both groups, the strategies for achieving it differed. The participants engaged in activities related to approaching the illness, accommodating, and connecting in order to strike a balance between the demands of the illness and non-illness aspects of their lives. The commonalities in the wish to be my best self that were found in both groups indicate that the wish to preserve a sense of self beyond the illness may not be illness-specific. The preliminary results of this secondary analysis suggest that building a positive sense of self in the face of illness is a critical part of illness adjustment and that there are opportunities for nurses and researchers to learn about the spectrum of strategies employed by individuals as they strive to move beyond the illness. French Même si les recherches indiquent que la perte d'identité est un thème universel qui concerne l'ensemble des maladies chroniques, peu d'études jusqu'ici ont abordé cette question en comparant la maladie mentale et la maladie physique. C'est ce qui amené les auteures à comparer ce phénomène chez des sujets souffrant de maladie mentale (schizophrénie précoce) et des sujets atteints d'une maladie physique (maladies chroniques du rein) dans le cadre d'une analyse secondaire. Elles ont étudié des données provenant de deux groupes échantillons afin de relever les points communs et divergents des thèmes émergents. Un but commun se dégage chez les sujets des deux groupes, soit de chercher à développer le meilleur de soi-même et à reprendre sa vie en main, mais les stratégies pour y parvenir diffèrent. Pour trouver un équilibre entre les exigences imposées par la maladie et les autres aspects de leur vie, les sujets ont rapporté s'investir dans des activités pour apprivoiser la maladie, s'adapter et se retrouver. Le désir de développer le meilleur de soi-même comportait des points communs dans les deux groupes, ce qui laisse croire que le désir de préserver l'intégrité du soi au-delà de la maladie ne découlerait pas du fait même d'être malade. Les résultats préliminaires de l'étude indiquent que la construction d'une identité positive est un facteur clé du processus d'adaptation à la maladie. Il reste donc beaucoup à apprendre sur l'éventail de stratégies mises en œuvre par les principaux intéressés pour distancer la maladie.
    The Canadian journal of nursing research = Revue canadienne de recherche en sciences infirmières 08/2006; 38(3):10-30.
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    ABSTRACT: The stress associated with managing a first episode of schizophrenia and the secondary psychological sequelae may predispose young people to the phenomenon of illness engulfment, whereby personal identity is lost and replaced with a sense of self defined entirely by the illness. The overall objective of this pilot project was to provide an initial evaluation of the impact of a novel group intervention targeting improvement of self-concept (engulfment) and overall quality of life for young adults recovering from a first episode of schizophrenia. Fifty-two young adults diagnosed with a DSM-IV schizophrenia spectrum disorder were sequentially assigned to either a 12-week group intervention that provided members with opportunities to attain healthy self-concepts or a control group that received high quality treatment as usual. The two groups were compared on pretreatment, post-treatment, and 3-month post-treatment measures of engulfment, quality of life, and psychiatric symptoms. Allowing for dropouts, 26 subjects remained in the treatment group and 14 subjects in the control group after the 3-month follow-up. Participants in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvement in engulfment, quality of life (intrapsychic subscale) and symptoms, while the comparison group did not change. These preliminary results provide support for the benefits of a group intervention designed to enhance self-concept and to minimize the engulfing effects of illness.
    Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal 02/2006; 30(2):105-11. · 1.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the experience of being on quarantine for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) with a focus on the relationship between perceived risk of contracting SARS and reported compliance with the quarantine order and protocols. Descriptive, qualitative. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with people who had been quarantined during the SARS outbreak in Toronto in 2003. Data analysis was completed using an iterative and collaborative approach of reading and re-reading the transcribed interviews, identifying common themes, and comparing and contrasting the data. To varying extents, participants wavered between fear and denial about their risk of contracting or spreading SARS. Reported compliance with the actual quarantine order was high. However, within households quarantine protocols were followed unevenly. This research indicates the need for greater credibility in public health communications to increase compliance with quarantine protocols and to contain outbreaks of new and deadly infectious diseases.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 02/2005; 37(4):343-7. · 1.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of home quarantine during the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in Toronto in 2003. Qualitative descriptive design. Stratified random sampling techniques were used to generate a list of potential participants, who varied in terms of gender and closeness of exposure to someone with suspected SARS (contact level). Twenty-one individuals participated in the study. All interviews were audiotaped and followed a semistructured interview guide. Participants were invited to describe their experience of quarantine in detail including their advice for Public Health. The experience followed a trajectory of stages beginning before quarantine and ending after quarantine. Despite individual differences, common themes of uncertainty, isolation, and coping intersected the data. Public Health has a dual role of monitoring compliance and providing support to people in quarantine. This study has implications for public health policy and practice in planning for future public health emergencies in terms of the information and the resources required to mount an effective response.
    Public Health Nursing 01/2005; 22(5):398-406. · 0.78 Impact Factor