Gordon D Logan

Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

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Publications (181)626.02 Total impact

  • Darryl W Schneider, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has revealed that task-switch costs (worse performance for task switches than for task repetitions) at the first position of an explicit task sequence are eliminated or reduced when repeating or switching sequences. The authors hypothesize that such effects are restricted to points in the sequence representation that are associated with sequence-level processing such as chunk retrieval that changes the contents of working memory. In an experiment testing this chunk-point hypothesis, subjects memorized and performed explicit task sequences under different chunking instructions that induced chunk points at different positions within the sequences. Regardless of position, performance was slower at chunk points than at non-chunk points, providing direct evidence of chunking, and task-switch costs were reduced or eliminated at chunk points while they remained large and robust at non-chunk points. These findings support the chunk-point hypothesis and are discussed in relation to task-set inhibition and associative interference.
    Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 09/2014; · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Skilled typing is controlled by two hierarchically structured processing loops (Logan & Crump, 2011): The outer loop, which produces words, commands the inner loop, which produces keystrokes. Here, we assessed the interplay between the two loops by investigating how visual feedback from the screen (responses either were or were not echoed on the screen) and the hands (the hands either were or were not covered with a box) influences the control of skilled typing. Our results indicated, first, that the reaction time of the first keystroke was longer when responses were not echoed than when they were. Also, the interkeystroke interval (IKSI) was longer when the hands were covered than when they were visible, and the IKSI for responses that were not echoed was longer when explicit error monitoring was required (Exp. 2) than when it was not required (Exp. 1). Finally, explicit error monitoring was more accurate when response echoes were present than when they were absent, and implicit error monitoring (i.e., posterror slowing) was not influenced by visual feedback from the screen or the hands. These findings suggest that the outer loop adjusts the inner-loop timing parameters to compensate for reductions in visual feedback. We suggest that these adjustments are preemptive control strategies designed to execute keystrokes more cautiously when visual feedback from the hands is absent, to generate more cautious motor programs when visual feedback from the screen is absent, and to enable enough time for the outer loop to monitor keystrokes when visual feedback from the screen is absent and explicit error reports are required.
    Attention Perception & Psychophysics 08/2014; · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    Kristy M Snyder, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: We address the problem of serial order in skilled typing, asking whether typists represent the identity and order of the keystrokes they type jointly by linking successive keystrokes into a chained sequence, or separately by associating keystrokes with position codes. In 4 experiments, typists prepared to type a prime word and were probed to type a target word. We varied the overlap between the identity and order of keystrokes in the prime and the target. Experiment 1 tested whether the identity of keystrokes can be primed separately from their order. Experiments 2 and 3 tested whether keystroke positions can be primed out of sequence. Experiment 4 tested whether keystrokes are primed equally across serial positions. The results were consistent with chaining theories: Keystroke identities were not primed separately from their order, keystroke positions were not primed out of sequence, and priming was graded across the keystroke sequence and depended on the number of keystrokes that were primed in sequence. We conclude by discussing the possibility that the problem of serial order may be solved differently for different sequential tasks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology Human Perception & Performance 06/2014; · 3.11 Impact Factor
  • Motonori Yamaguchi, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: The present study investigated the way people acquire and control skilled performance in the context of typewriting. Typing skill was degraded by changing the location of a key (target key) while retaining the locations of other keys to disable an association between the letter and the key. We conducted 4 experiments: Experiment 1 demonstrated that disabling a letter-key association affected not only the execution of the target keystroke but also the planning of other keystrokes for words involving the target key. In Experiments 2-4, typists practiced with a new target location and then transferred to a condition in which they typed the practiced words with the original key location (Experiment 2) or typed new words with the practiced key location (Experiments 3 and 4). Experiment 2 showed that the newly acquired letter-key association interfered with the execution of the original keystroke but not planning. Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated that acquisition of the new letter-key association depended on multiple levels of linguistic units. Experiment 4 demonstrated that acquisition of the new association depended on sequences both before and after the target keystroke. We discuss implications of the results for 2 prominent approaches to modeling sequential behavior: hierarchical control and recurrent network models. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology Learning Memory and Cognition 06/2014; · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Decision-making is explained by psychologists through stochastic accumulator models and by neurophysiologists through the activity of neurons believed to instantiate these models. We investigated an overlooked scaling problem: How does a response time (RT) that can be explained by a single model accumulator arise from numerous, redundant accumulator neurons, each of which individually appears to explain the variability of RT? We explored this scaling problem by developing a unique ensemble model of RT, called e pluribus unum, which embodies the well-known dictum "out of many, one." We used the e pluribus unum model to analyze the RTs produced by ensembles of redundant, idiosyncratic stochastic accumulators under various termination mechanisms and accumulation rate correlations in computer simulations of ensembles of varying size. We found that predicted RT distributions are largely invariant to ensemble size if the accumulators share at least modestly correlated accumulation rates and RT is not governed by the most extreme accumulators. Under these regimes the termination times of individual accumulators was predictive of ensemble RT. We also found that the threshold measured on individual accumulators, corresponding to the firing rate of neurons measured at RT, can be invariant with RT but is equivalent to the specified model threshold only when the rate correlation is very high.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/2014; 111(7):2848-53. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Response inhibition is an important act of control in many domains of psychology and neuroscience. It is often studied in a stop-signal task that requires subjects to inhibit an ongoing action in response to a stop signal. Performance in the stop-signal task is understood as a race between a go process that underlies the action and a stop process that inhibits the action. Responses are inhibited if the stop process finishes before the go process. The finishing time of the stop process is not directly observable; a mathematical model is required to estimate its duration. Logan and Cowan (1984) developed an independent race model that is widely used for this purpose. We present a general race model that extends the independent race model to account for the role of choice in go and stop processes, and a special race model that assumes each runner is a stochastic accumulator governed by a diffusion process. We apply the models to 2 data sets to test assumptions about selective influence of capacity limitations on drift rates and strategies on thresholds, which are largely confirmed. The model provides estimates of distributions of stop-signal response times, which previous models could not estimate. We discuss implications of viewing cognitive control as the result of a repertoire of acts of control tailored to different tasks and situations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Psychological Review 01/2014; 121(1):66-95. · 9.80 Impact Factor
  • Darryl W Schneider, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: The contingent encoding assumption is the idea that response selection in task-switching situations does not begin until the cue and the target have both been encoded. The authors tested the assumption by manipulating response congruency, stimulus order, and stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) in two experiments. They found evidence of response selection prior to cue encoding for congruent targets with target-cue order at a long SOA, indicating that the contingent encoding assumption is invalid. The authors describe how contingent encoding can be removed from an existing task-switching model by introducing baseline evidence-task-neutral evidence that serves as a baseline for response selection prior to stimulus encoding. Simulations revealed that the modified model could reproduce the full pattern of response time data and generate responses prior to cue encoding. The authors conclude by discussing directions for further model development.
    Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006) 10/2013; · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted four experiments to investigate skilled typists' explicit knowledge of the locations of keys on the QWERTY keyboard, with three procedures: free recall (Exp. 1), cued recall (Exp. 2), and recognition (Exp. 3). We found that skilled typists' explicit knowledge of key locations is incomplete and inaccurate. The findings are consistent with theories of skilled performance and automaticity that associate implicit knowledge with skilled performance and explicit knowledge with novice performance. In Experiment 4, we investigated whether novice typists acquire more complete explicit knowledge of key locations when learning to touch-type. We had skilled QWERTY typists complete a Dvorak touch-typing tutorial. We then tested their explicit knowledge of the Dvorak and QWERTY key locations with the free recall task. We found no difference in explicit knowledge of the two keyboards, suggesting that typists know little about key locations on the keyboard, whether they are exposed to the keyboard for 2 h or 12 years.
    Attention Perception & Psychophysics 10/2013; · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An unresolved issue in the task-switching literature is whether preparatory reconfiguration occurs before a change of task. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to determine whether preparatory reconfiguration occurs during two different task-switching procedures: voluntary and cued task switching. We focused on two ERP components that index different cognitive operations. The contingent negative variation (CNV) is a sensitive measure of a participant's preparedness to use a specific stimulus-response mapping. In contrast, the P3 indexes memory updating. We found a pronounced modulation of the CNV before voluntary task switches, but not before cued task switches. Instead, cued task switches were preceded by a larger P3, as compared with task repetitions. Our findings suggest that task set reconfiguration is carried out prior to voluntary task switches, whereas memory processes dominate cued task switches.
    Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 08/2013; · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: When we plan sequences of actions, we must hold some elements of the sequence in working memory (WM) while we execute others. Research shows that execution of an action can be delayed if it partly overlaps (vs. does not overlap) with another action plan maintained in WM (partial repetition cost). However, it is not known whether all features of the action maintained in WM interfere equally with current actions. Most serial models of memory and action assume that interference will be equal, because all action features in the sequence should be activated to an equal degree in parallel; others assume that action features earlier in the sequence will interfere more than those later in the sequence, because earlier features will be more active. Using a partial repetition paradigm, this study examined whether serial position of action features in action sequences maintained in WM have an influence on current actions. Two stimulus events occurred in a sequence, and participants planned and maintained an action sequence to the first event (action A) in WM while executing a speeded response to the second event (action B). Results showed delayed execution of action B when it matched the first feature in the action A sequence (partial repetition cost), but not when it matched the last feature. These findings suggest that serial order is represented in the action plan prior to response execution, consistent with models that assume that serial order is represented by a primacy gradient of parallel feature activation prior to action execution.
    Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 07/2013; · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    Motonori Yamaguchi, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: Theories of skilled performance propose that highly trained skills involve hierarchically structured control processes. The present study examined and demonstrated hierarchical control at several levels of processing in skilled typewriting. In the first two experiments, we scrambled the order of letters in words to prevent skilled typists from chunking letters, and compared typing words and scrambled words. Experiment 1 manipulated stimulus quality to reveal chunking in perception, and Experiment 2 manipulated concurrent memory load to reveal chunking in short-term memory (STM). Both experiments manipulated the number of letters in words and nonwords to reveal chunking in motor planning. In the next two experiments, we degraded typing skill by altering the usual haptic feedback by using a laser-projection keyboard, so that typists had to monitor keystrokes. Neither the number of motor chunks (Experiment 3) nor the number of STM items (Experiment 4) was influenced by the manipulation. The results indicate that the utilization of hierarchical control depends on whether the input allows chunking but not on whether the output is generated automatically. We consider the role of automaticity in hierarchical control of skilled performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology Human Perception & Performance 07/2013; · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    Patrick G Bissett, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: The search-step paradigm addresses the processes involved in changing movement plans, usually saccadic eye-movements. Subjects move their eyes to a target (T1) among distractors, but when the target steps to a new location (T2), subjects are instructed to move their eyes directly from fixation to the new location. We ask whether moving to T2 requires a separate stop process that inhibits the movement to T1. It need not. The movement plan for the second response may inhibit the first response. To distinguish these hypotheses, we decoupled the offset of T1 from the onset of T2. If the second movement is sufficient to inhibit the first, then the probability of responding to T1 should depend only on T2 onset. If a separate stop process is required, then the probability of responding to T1 should depend only on T1 offset, which acts as a stop signal. We tested these hypotheses in manual and saccadic search-step tasks and found that the probability of responding to T1 depended most strongly on T1 offset, supporting the hypothesis that changing from one movement plan to another involves a separate stop process that inhibits the first plan. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology Human Perception & Performance 05/2013; · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    Patrick G Bissett, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: Selective stopping paradigms address selectivity in controlled behavior, as subjects stop certain responses or responses to certain stimuli. The literature has discussed 2 strategies for selective stopping. First, selective stopping may prolong the stop process by adding a discrimination stage (Independent Discriminate then Stop). Second, selective stopping may involve stopping nonselectively and then restarting the response if the signal is an ignore signal (Stop then Discriminate). We discovered a variant of the first strategy that occurred often in our experiments and previously published experiments: The requirement to discriminate stop and ignore signals may interact with the go process, invalidating the independent race model (Dependent Discriminate then Stop). Our experiments focused on stimulus selective stopping, in which subjects stop to one signal and ignore another. When stop and ignore signals were equally likely, some subjects used the Stop then Discriminate strategy and others used the Dependent Discriminate then Stop strategy. When stop signals were more frequent than ignore signals, most subjects used the Stop then Discriminate strategy; when ignore signals were more frequent than stop signals, most subjects used the Dependent Discriminate then Stop strategy. The commonly accepted Independent Discriminate then Stop strategy was seldom implemented. Selective stopping was either not selective (Stop then Discriminate), or interacted with going (Dependent Discriminate then Stop). Implications for the cognitive science, lifespan development, clinical science, and neuroscience of selective stopping are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology General 03/2013; · 3.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The stop-signal paradigm is a popular method for examining response inhibition and impulse control in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and clinical domains because it allows the estimation of the covert latency of the stop process: the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT). In three sets of simulations, we examined to what extent SSRTs that were estimated with the popular mean and integration methods were influenced by the skew of the reaction time distribution and the gradual slowing of the response latencies. We found that the mean method consistently overestimated SSRT. The integration method tended to underestimate SSRT when response latencies gradually increased. This underestimation bias was absent when SSRTs were estimated with the integration method for smaller blocks of trials. Thus, skewing and response slowing can lead to spurious inhibitory differences. We recommend that the mean method of estimating SSRT be abandoned in favor of the integration method.
    Psychological Science 02/2013; · 4.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The stop-signal paradigm is frequently used to study response inhibition. In this paradigm, participants perform a two-choice response time (RT) task where the primary task is occasionally interrupted by a stop-signal that prompts participants to withhold their response. The primary goal is to estimate the latency of the unobservable stop response (stop signal reaction time or SSRT). Recently, Matzke et al. (2013) have developed a Bayesian parametric approach (BPA) that allows for the estimation of the entire distribution of SSRTs. The BPA assumes that SSRTs are ex-Gaussian distributed and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to estimate the parameters of the SSRT distribution. Here we present an efficient and user-friendly software implementation of the BPA-BEESTS-that can be applied to individual as well as hierarchical stop-signal data. BEESTS comes with an easy-to-use graphical user interface and provides users with summary statistics of the posterior distribution of the parameters as well various diagnostic tools to assess the quality of the parameter estimates. The software is open source and runs on Windows and OS X operating systems. In sum, BEESTS allows experimental and clinical psychologists to estimate entire distributions of SSRTs and hence facilitates the more rigorous analysis of stop-signal data.
    Frontiers in Psychology 01/2013; 4:918. · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    Kristy M Snyder, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: It is often disruptive to attend to the details of one's expert performance. The current work presents four experiments that utilized a monitor to report protocol to evaluate the sufficiency of three accounts of monitoring-induced disruption. The inhibition hypothesis states that disruption results from costs associated with preparing to withhold inappropriate responses. The dual-task hypothesis states that disruption results from maintaining monitored information in working memory. The implicit-explicit hypothesis states that disruption results from explicitly monitoring details of performance that are normally implicit. The findings suggest that all three hypotheses are sufficient to produce disruption, but inhibition and dual-task costs are not necessary. Experiment 1 showed that monitoring to report was disruptive even when there was no requirement to inhibit. Experiment 2 showed that maintaining information in working memory caused some disruption but much less than monitoring to report. Experiment 4 showed that monitoring to inhibit was more disruptive than monitoring to report, suggesting that monitoring is more disruptive when it is combined with other task requirements, such as inhibition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology Human Perception & Performance 12/2012; · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cognitive concept of response inhibition can be measured with the stop-signal paradigm. In this paradigm, participants perform a 2-choice response time (RT) task where, on some of the trials, the primary task is interrupted by a stop signal that prompts participants to withhold their response. The dependent variable of interest is the latency of the unobservable stop response (stop-signal reaction time, or SSRT). Based on the horse race model (Logan & Cowan, 1984), several methods have been developed to estimate SSRTs. None of these approaches allow for the accurate estimation of the entire distribution of SSRTs. Here we introduce a Bayesian parametric approach that addresses this limitation. Our method is based on the assumptions of the horse race model and rests on the concept of censored distributions. We treat response inhibition as a censoring mechanism, where the distribution of RTs on the primary task (go RTs) is censored by the distribution of SSRTs. The method assumes that go RTs and SSRTs are ex-Gaussian distributed and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to obtain posterior distributions for the model parameters. The method can be applied to individual as well as hierarchical data structures. We present the results of a number of parameter recovery and robustness studies and apply our approach to published data from a stop-signal experiment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology General 11/2012; · 3.99 Impact Factor
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    Motonori Yamaguchi, Gordon D Logan, Vanessa Li
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    ABSTRACT: Does response selection select words or letters in skilled typewriting? Typing performance involves hierarchically organized control processes: an outer loop that controls word level processing, and an inner loop that controls letter (or keystroke) level processing. The present study addressed whether response selection occurs in the outer loop or the inner loop by using the psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm in which Task1 required typing single words and Task2 required vocal responses to tones. The number of letters (string length) in the words was manipulated to discriminate selection of words from selection of keystrokes. In Experiment 1, the PRP effect depended on string length of words in Task1, suggesting that response selection occurs in the inner loop. To assess contributions of the outer loop, the influence of string length was examined in a lexical-decision task that also involves word encoding and lexical access (Experiment 2), or to-be-typed words were preexposed so outer-loop processing could finish before typing started (Experiment 3). Response time for Task2 (RT2) did not depend on string length with lexical decision, and RT2 still depended on string length with typing preexposed strings. These results support the inner-loop locus of the PRP effect. In Experiment 4, typing was performed as Task2, and the effect of string length on typing RT interacted with stimulus onset asynchrony superadditively, implying that another bottleneck also exists in the outer loop. We conclude that there are at least two bottleneck processes in skilled typewriting. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology Human Perception & Performance 11/2012; · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Typing performance involves hierarchically structured control systems: At the higher level, an outer loop generates a word or a series of words to be typed; at the lower level, an inner loop activates the keystrokes comprising the word in parallel and executes them in the correct order. The present experiments examined contributions of the outer- and inner-loop processes to the control of speed and accuracy in typewriting. Experiments 1 and 2 involved discontinuous typing of single words, and Experiments 3 and 4 involved continuous typing of paragraphs. Across experiments, typists were able to trade speed for accuracy but were unable to type at rates faster than 100 ms/keystroke, implying limits to the flexibility of the underlying processes. The analyses of the component latencies and errors indicated that the majority of the trade-offs were due to inner-loop processing. The contribution of outer-loop processing to the trade-offs was small, but it resulted in large costs in error rate. Implications for strategic control of automatic processes are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology Human Perception & Performance 11/2012; · 3.11 Impact Factor
  • Matthew J C Crump, Gordon D Logan
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    ABSTRACT: Error detection serves 2 different functions: prevention and cure. Prevention engages post-error slowing to reduce future errors, whereas cure engages processes that correct the error. Thus, prevention predicts post-error slowing, and cure does not. We investigated this distinction in skilled typists in 3 experiments. In Experiment 1, post-error performance was investigated in 800 typists who completed a short continuous typing test where correction was disallowed. In Experiments 2 and 3, post-error performance and post-correction performance were investigated by manipulating whether typists were allowed to correct their mistakes. Across experiments, there was limited evidence that typists used error detection for prevention; typists preferred the cure. After making mistakes, they corrected them and rapidly resumed typing at normal rates. Post-error slowing occurred only when correction was disabled; post-error speeding occurred when correction was enabled. This finding offers support for the novel hypothesis that post-error slowing reflects the inhibition of pre-potent tendencies to correct mistakes. Error-detection processes in general will be better understood by distinguishing between tasks that allow performers to cure their errors through correction rather than reduce their errors through prevention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Experimental Psychology General 09/2012; · 3.99 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

11k Citations
626.02 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Purdue University
      • Department of Psychological Sciences
      West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
    • Washington State University
      • Department of Psychology
      Pullman, WA, United States
    • University of Exeter
      • College of Life and Environmental Sciences
      Exeter, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2001–2012
    • Vanderbilt University
      • Department of Psychology
      Nashville, MI, United States
    • University of Notre Dame
      • Department of Psychology
      Indiana, PA, United States
  • 2010–2011
    • Carnegie Mellon University
      • Department of Psychology
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
    • Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology
      • Institute of Psychology
      Beijing, Beijing Shi, China
    • California Institute of Technology
      Pasadena, California, United States
  • 2007
    • Lehigh University
      Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2006
    • McMaster University
      Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • 2003
    • Leiden University
      • Institute of Psychology
      Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2002
    • Dalhousie University
      Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 1994–2002
    • University of Amsterdam
      • Department of Developmental Psychology
      Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 1988–2001
    • University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
      • Department of Psychology
      Urbana, Illinois, United States
  • 1999
    • University of California, San Diego
      • Department of Psychology
      San Diego, CA, United States
  • 1998
    • Stanford University
      • Department of Psychology
      Stanford, CA, United States
  • 1995
    • University of Groningen
      Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • 1989–1990
    • SickKids
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Louisiana State University
      • Department of Psychology
      Baton Rouge, LA, United States
  • 1983
    • University of British Columbia - Vancouver
      • Department of Psychology
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 1978–1979
    • University of Toronto
      • Department of Psychology
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada