Gail Chapman

University Hospital Of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke-upon-Trent, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (3)9.93 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To assess whether the G allele of the serotonin receptor 1A C(-1019)G polymorphism is associated with premenstrual dysphoric disorder. The study sample comprised 53 women with clinically diagnosed premenstrual dysphoric disorder (age range 27-46 years, mean 37.7 years) and 51 healthy control subjects (age range 22-48 years, mean 36.2 years). The serotonin receptor 1A C(-1019)G polymorphism was genotyped and compared between the two groups. In contrast to the postulated "high-risk" G/G genotype, there was a marked overrepresentation of the C/C genotype in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder group (P=.034; odds ratio 3.63, 95% confidence interval 1.22-10.78). The presence of at least one C allele was associated with a 2.5-fold increased risk of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (P=.053; odds ratio 2.46, 95% confidence interval 1.03-5.88). Our hypothesis that the high-risk G allele is associated with the occurrence of premenstrual dysphoria was not proved in this study. However, due to the increased prevalence of the C variant, we suggest that the C(-1019) allele may contribute to the risk of premenstrual dysphoria. II.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 11/2007; 110(4):788-92. · 4.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether common polymorphisms of key genes that control the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) pathway are associated with premenstrual dysphoric disorder. The study sample comprised 53 women with clinically diagnosed premenstrual dysphoric disorder (age range, 27-46 years; mean age, 37.7 years) and 52 healthy control subjects (age range, 22-48 years; mean age, 36.2 years). Eight polymorphisms that encode the 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (LPR, VNTR-2, and 3' UTR G/T), tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1 G-6526A, G-5806T, and A218C), and monoamine oxidase A (monoamine oxidase A promoter VNTR-1 and exon 8 Fnu 4H1) were genotyped. Genotype and allelic frequencies were analyzed by chi-square test and stepwise logistic regression analysis. There was no significant association between any genotype and clinical category and no significant allelic distribution profiles in either the premenstrual dysphoric disorder group or the control group. These findings do not support a major role for common 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter, TPH1, and monoamine oxidase A polymorphisms in contributing to susceptibility to premenstrual dysphoric disorder.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 12/2006; 195(5):1254-9. · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry allows trace gas quantification in exhaled breath and in the air/vapor above liquids (headspace) down to the 10 parts-per-billion level. During selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry investigation of the volatile compounds emitted by urine, high acetone levels were incidentally identified in the headspace of urine from healthy female volunteers around their mid-cycle. Hence, this study was designed to measure urine headspace acetone levels throughout the menstrual cycle. Using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry we measured daily urine headspace acetone concentrations of seven ovulating (group 1) and three postmenopausal volunteers (group 2). A several-fold increase in urine headspace acetone level was detected 2-3 days after the predicted day of ovulation in 5 of the 7 volunteers in group 1. No such rise was detected in group 2. This study provides the basis for future research to understand the reason for and the potential utility of this phenomenon.
    Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica 02/2006; 85(8):1008-11. · 1.85 Impact Factor