G Rajka

University of Oslo (UiO), Oslo, Oslo, Norway

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Publications (7)61.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether fish oil and/or corn oil had a beneficial effect on the clinical state of atopic dermatitis, and to evaluate the dietary intake of nutrients in this group of patients. In a double-blind, multicentre study lasting 4 months, during wintertime, 145 patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis were randomly assigned to receive either 6 g/day of concentrated n-3 fatty acids, or an isoenergetic amount of corn oil. As local treatment, only an emollient cream or hydrocortisone cream was allowed. The fatty acid pattern in serum phospholipids, and the dietary intake of nutrients were monitored in a subgroup of patients, and the results were compared with a group of patients with psoriasis. The overall clinical score, as evaluated by the physicians, improved during the trial by 30% in the fish oil (P<0.001) and 24% in the corn oil group (P<0.001). This was also consistent with the results from a selected skin area, and it was further confirmed by the total subjective clinical score reported by the patients. There were no significant differences in the clinical scores between the two groups at baseline, and at the end of the study. In the fish oil group, the amount of n-3 fatty acids in serum phospholipids was significantly increased at the end of the trial, compared with pretreatment values (P<0.001), whereas the level of n-6 fatty acids was decreased (P<0.001). In the corn oil group, arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and total n-6 fatty acids, increased significantly (P<0.05), whereas the other fatty acids were similar after corn oil supplementation, compared with baseline. Clinical improvement was significantly correlated with an increase in the concentration of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6, n-3) in serum phospholipids for the total group (P<0.05). Our patients with atopic dermatitis had significantly lower levels of both n-6 (P<0.01) and n-3 (P<0.001) fatty acids in serum phospholipids prior to the start of the trial compared with patients with psoriasis.In this large multicentre study of 145 patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis, there was a progressive significant improvement of the clinical condition in both groups, compared with baseline scores. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups, which implies the possibility of a placebo effect.
    British Journal of Dermatology 07/2006; 130(6):757 - 764. · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In several studies dietary fish oil has been found to have beneficial effect on psoriasis, but the results are contradictory and based mainly on open studies or studies of small numbers of patients. In a four-month double-blind, multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 145 patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis to receive in their diet either highly purified ethyl esters of n-3 fatty acids ("fish oil"; 6 g of oil per day, containing 5 g of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid) or an isoenergetic amount of corn oil containing mainly n-6 fatty acids. All the patients were advised to reduce their intake of saturated fatty acids. A 48-hour dietary recall was performed, and the fatty-acid pattern in the serum phospholipids was monitored in a subgroup of patients. In the fish-oil group, n-3 fatty acids were increased in serum phospholipids (P < 0.001), the ratio of arachidonic acid to eicosapentaenoic acid decreased (P < 0.001), and the level of n-6 fatty acids decreased (P < 0.001). In the corn-oil group, only docosahexaenoic acid increased significantly (P < 0.05). The ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids increased in both groups. Plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol decreased from base line in the fish-oil group (P < 0.05). The score on the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, as evaluated by the physicians, did not change significantly during the trial in either group. This was also true of a total subjective score reported by the patients, but a selected area of skin in the corn-oil group showed a significant reduction in the clinical signs (P < 0.05). Scaling was reduced from base line in both groups (P < 0.01). The fish-oil group had less cellular infiltration (P < 0.01), and the corn-oil group had improvement in desquamation and redness (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in clinical manifestations between the groups. Among the patients in the fish-oil group, an increase in the concentration of n-3 fatty acids in serum phospholipids was not accompanied by clinical improvement, whereas in the corn-oil group there was a significant correlation between clinical improvement and an increase in eicosapentaenoic acid and total n-3 fatty acids. Dietary supplementation with very-long-chain n-3 fatty acids was no better than corn-oil supplementation in treating psoriasis. Clinical improvement was not correlated with an increase in the concentration of n-3 fatty acids in serum phospholipids among the patients in the fish-oil group, whereas there was a significant correlation between clinical improvement and an increase in eicosapentaenoic acid and total n-3 fatty acids in the corn-oil group.
    New England Journal of Medicine 06/1993; 328(25):1812-6. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Incidence of malignant melanoma of the skin has risen rapidly during the last decades. Mortality rates are also rising, although not so much as incidence rates. There is strong evidence that exposure to sunlight is a major factor in the etiology of melanomas. There appears to be no direct cumulative dose-response relationship, except in the case of lentigo maligna melanoma. Episodes of sunburn among children and young individuals seem to be more important as an etiologic factor for melanoma than chronic exposure to the sun. Very high risk of melanoma exists in persons with dysplastic nevus syndrome. Persons with giant congenital nevi are also at increased risk. However, many melanomas arise de novo. It is our intention to reduce mortality by screening families at risk, by early detection and treatment of melanomas, and by education.
    Tidsskrift for Den norske legeforening 05/1990; 110(10):1202-5.
  • G Rajka
    Acta dermato-venereologica. Supplementum 02/1989; 144:10-2.
  • Acta dermato-venereologica. Supplementum 02/1989; 144:139.
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of dietary supplement with n-3 fatty acids to patients with atopic dermatitis were investigated in a 12-week, prospective, double-blind study. The experimental group received daily 10 g of fish oil, containing 3 g n-3 fatty acids, of which eicosapentaenoic acid represented about 1.8 g. The controls received an isoenergetic placebo supplement containing olive oil. Compliance was monitored by gas chromatographic analysis of fatty acid pattern in serum phospholipids. Results favoured the experimental group with regard to scale (P less than 0.05), itch (P less than 0.05) and overall subjective severity (P less than 0.02) as compared to the controls.
    Journal of internal medicine. Supplement 02/1989; 731:233-6.
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of a dietary supplement of n-3 fatty acids in patients with atopic dermatitis were investigated in a 12-week, double-blind study. The experimental group received 10 g of fish oil daily, of which about 1.8 g was eicosapentaenoic acid. This amount of eicosapentaenoic acid can be obtained from a daily intake of fat fish. The controls received an iso-energetic placebo supplement containing olive oil. Compliance was monitored by gas-chromatographic analysis of the fatty acid pattern in serum phospholipids. Results favoured the experimental group with regard to scale (P less than 0.05), itch (P less than 0.05) and overall subjective severity (P less than 0.02) as compared to the controls.
    British Journal of Dermatology 11/1987; 117(4):463-9. · 3.76 Impact Factor