Fabrice Ruiz

ClinSearch, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

Are you Fabrice Ruiz?

Claim your profile

Publications (3)10.45 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Invasive fungal disease (IFD) remains a major concern in patients with haematological conditions. We describe diagnoses, therapeutic management and outcomes in unselected consecutive patients from haematological facilities treated for suspected or documented IFD. In this observational prospective study, children/adults with haematological conditions or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were recruited upon start of non-prophylactic systemic antifungal treatment in 37 French haematological facilities (December 2007 to December 2008). IFD episodes were classified according to the 2008 EORTC/MSG criteria. The cohort included 419 patients (298 adults and 121 children): 88% haematological malignancies, 28% HSCT recipients and 68% neutropenic. Patients had 423 IFD episodes: 21% mycologically documented (59% probable/proven aspergillosis, 32% proven candidiasis and 9% probable/proven other IFD) and 20% classified as possible IFD. The remaining cases were assigned to two groups: febrile neutropenia (34%) and unclassified (25%), 9% of which were classified as possible/probable/proven IFD by day 7. Treatment was thus initiated early in 59% of patients; liposomal amphotericin B and caspofungin were the most common single-agent therapies. The 12 week mortality was 18% for probable/proven aspergillosis, 15% for proven candidiasis, 10% for probable/proven other IFD, 9% for possible IFD, 3% for febrile neutropenia and 12% for unclassified episodes (log rank P = 0.016); it was dependent on age, complete remission of underlying haematological disease and mechanical ventilation. In this comprehensive sample of haematological patients receiving antifungal treatment, we observe a widespread resort to early therapy and a low mortality rate, including in patients with probable or proven IFD.
    Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 07/2012; 67(11):2731-8. DOI:10.1093/jac/dks266 · 5.44 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The APTIMA HPV Assay (AHPV) allows detection of 14 high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) RNA types in cervical specimens. Until present, the assay has been compared to HPV DNA tests only in triage settings. Herein, we compare AHPV with a DNA assay (Hybrid Capture 2; HC2) and liquid-based cytology (LBC; using PreservCyt ThinPrep liquid Pap) in a screening setting (French APTIMA screening evaluation [FASE] study). Women (N = 5,006) aged 20-65 were screened by gynecologists in 17 private practices in Paris, France. One cervical specimen was collected and tested with LBC, AHPV and HC2 assays. Women were referred to colposcopy if they were ASC-US+ in LBC or HPV positive in either HPV assay. To control for verification bias, a random group (14%) with normal LBC and dually HPV negative tests underwent colposcopy. Data from 4,429 women were analyzed. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated for the three tests. AHPV and HC2 were highly sensitive for CIN2+ (92.0% and 96.7%) and CIN3+ (95.7% and 95.3%) detection and much more sensitive than LBC (69.1% for CIN2+ and 73.3% for CIN3+). Specificity of AHPV was higher than that of HC2, but similar to that of LBC (p < 0.001). Combining LBC with either HPV test slightly increased sensitivity but compromised specificity. AHPV assay is both specific and sensitive for the detection of high-grade precancerous lesions and may be considered as an option for routine cervical cancer screening for women over 20 years of age.
    International Journal of Cancer 08/2011; 129(3):691-701. DOI:10.1002/ijc.25726 · 5.01 Impact Factor