E Marchini

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (4)13.23 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Sleepers were studied in their homes to obtain measures of relationships between (a) discrepancies between reported and recorded sleep, (b) degree of sleep difficulty, and (e) reported cognitive activity. Twelve good sleepers and 12 insomniacs were questioned immediately after lights out, at the occurrence of the first sleep spindle or K-complex, 10 min after the second sleep onset, 5 min after the onset of the first REM period, 10 min after the onset of the first stage 2, during subsequent periods of REM and stage 2 sleep, and at spontaneous arousals. Subjects responded to questions regarding mental content (thought vs picture, awake vs asleep, audience vs actor), estimated total time, and estimated total sleep time since the previous arousal. Insomniacs overestimated sleep difficulty only at 10 min after the second spindle and at spontaneous arousals. Reports of “picture” and “actor” were associated with sleeping difficulty. Persons who reported being “awake,”“actor,” and “picture” showed significantly greater discrepancies between reported and recorded sleep than persons who reported “sleep,”“audience,” or “thought”. The results are discussed in terms of implications for increased understanding of the phenomenon of insomnia.
    Psychophysiology 01/2007; 20(3):243 - 250. DOI:10.1111/j.1469-8986.1983.tb02151.x · 3.18 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sleepers were studied in their homes to obtain measures of relationships between (a) discrepancies between reported and recorded sleep, (b) degree of sleep difficulty, and (c) reported cognitive activity. Twelve good sleepers and 12 insomniacs were questioned immediately after lights out, at the occurrence of the first sleep spindle or K-complex, 10 min after the second sleep onset, 5 min after the onset of the first REM period, 10 min after the onset of the first stage 2, during subsequent periods of REM and stage 2 sleep, and at spontaneous arousals. Subjects responded to questions regarding mental content (thought vs picture, awake vs sleep, audience vs actor), estimated total time, and estimated total sleep time since the previous arousal. Insomniacs overestimated sleep difficulty only at 10 min after the second spindle and at spontaneous arousals. Reports of 'picture' and 'actor' were associated with sleeping difficulty. Persons who reported being 'awake', 'actor' and 'picture' showed significantly greater discrepancies between reported and recorded sleep than persons who reported 'sleep', 'audience', or 'thought'. The results are discussed in terms of implications for increased understanding of the phenomenon of insomnia.
    Psychophysiology 06/1983; 20(3):243-50. · 3.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twelve good sleepers and 12 insomniacs were recorded over three nights in their homes. Subjective assessment of sleep indicated minimal disruption due to sleep recording procedures. A cut point of 88 per cent sleep efficiency resulted in correct classification of nine poor sleepers and 10 good sleepers. Multiple discriminant function analyses, using variables related to rapid eye movement sleep, resulted in the same number of correct classifications. The two indices combined resulted in 100 per cent exclusion of false positives for good sleepers and insomniacs. Insomniacs also showed more night-to night variability in sleep and greater difficulty in returning to sleep once aroused. These results show that good sleepers and insomniacs can be distinquished with a high degree of resolution using variables derived from the home all-night sleep recording.
    Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease 05/1982; 170(4):224-30. DOI:10.1097/00005053-198204000-00007 · 1.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Home sleep recordings were conducted over four consecutive nights with 12 good sleepers and 12 sleep-maintenance insomniacs. Good sleepers showed decreased sleep efficiency and increased min awake after sleep onset on night 1. Insomniacs showed extended latency to onset of the first REM period and decreased REM in the first third of the initial recording night. Good sleepers and insomniacs reported no significant differences in adequacy of sleep between the first and subsequent sleep nights.
    Sleep 10/1981; 4(3):293-8. · 5.06 Impact Factor