F Mortier

Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et l'Environnement, Gif, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (24)54.66 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An aqueous alcohol extract of Eschscholzia californica (Ec) has been evaluated for benzodiazepine, neuroleptic, antidepressant, antihistaminic and analgesic properties, in order to complete the study of the sedative and anxiolytic effects previously demonstrated. The plant extract did not protect mice against the convulsant effects of pentylenetetrazol, and did not cause muscle relaxant effects but appeared to possess an affinity for the benzodiazepine receptor: thus, flumazenil, an antagonist of these receptors, suppressed the sedative and anxiolytic effects of the extract. The Ec extract induced peripheral analgesic effects in mice but did not possess antidepressant, neuroleptic or antihistaminic effects.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2001; 15(5):377-81. · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • D Beaux, J Fleurentin, F Mortier
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    ABSTRACT: Aqueous extracts of Sambucus nigra and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and hydroalcohol extracts of Orthosiphon stamineus and Hieracium pilosella were tested for their diuretic activities in rats; pharmacological evaluation revealed that they led to an increase in urine flow. Urinary sodium excretion in rats was increased with O. stamineus and S. nigra.
    Phytotherapy Research 06/1999; 13(3):222-5. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A lyophilized aqueous extract of Euphorbia hirta L. (Eh) has been evaluated for benzodiazepine-like properties and for hypnotic, neuroleptic and antidepressant properties, in order to complete the study of dose-dependent sedative and analgesic effects previously demonstrated. The plant extract did not protect mice against the convulsant effects of pentylenetetrazol, it did not cause muscle relaxant effects and it did not seem to possess any affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In addition, Eh did not have its own hypnotic effects in mice, but it intensified those of barbiturates, and caused a direct action on the central nervous system. This aqueous extract did not possess neuroleptic activity, but slight antidepressant effects were obtained against reserpine-induced ptosis and oxotremorine-induced hypothermia.
    Phytotherapy Research 12/1998; 10(8):670 - 676. · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • D. Beaux, J. Fleurentin, F. Mortier
    Phytotherapy Research 01/1998; 12(7):498-501. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lyophilised hydroalcoholic and aqueous extracts of the aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae) (Passion-flower), as well as chemical constituents of the plant, indole alkaloids (harman, harmin, harmalin, harmol, and harmalol) maltol and flavonoids (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin and isovitexin) were assessed for behavioral effects in mice. The accordance with the traditional use of P. incarnata, psychotropic properties were confirmed by some behavioral tests in mice. The anxiolytic properties of hydroalcoholic extract were confirmed at 400 mg/kg by the increase of rears and steps climbed in the staircase test (non-familiar environmental test), and the increase in locomotion and time spent in light side in the light/dark box choice test (non-familiar environmental test). The sedative properties of aqueous extract were confirmed at 400 g/kg by decrease of rears and steps climbed in the staircase test and the decrease of rears and locomotion in the free exploratory test. Moreover, the aqueous extract induced sleep in mice after treatment with a sub-hypnotic dose of pentobarbital.
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology 07/1997; 57(1):11-20. · 2.94 Impact Factor
  • D. Beaux, J. Fleurentin, F. Mortier
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    ABSTRACT: Hydroalcohol extracts of Foeniculum vulgare var dulce (D.C) root were tested for their diuretic activity in rats. Pharmacological evaluation revealed that they led to an increase in urine flow and urinary sodium excretion in rats. Dose effect relations were also assessed. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 06/1997; 11(4):320-322. · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Ethnopharmacology 06/1997; 57(1):11-20. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The iridoids of Harpagophytum procumbens and Harpagophytum zeyheri were studied by CLHP. Harpagoside is the main iridoid for both drugs whereas 8-p-coumaroylharpagide is a representative iridoid of Harpagophytum zeyheri only. The ratio harpagoside/8-p-coumaroylharpagide can be used to distinguish chemically both species. For commercial dried aqueous extracts this ratio is intermediate because they are probably prepared from a mixture of H. procumbens and H. zeyheri drugs. The aqueous extracts of both drugs show similar analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Harpagophytum procumbens and Harpagophytum zeyheri should be accepted as sources for the drug Harpagophyti radix.
    Planta Medica 05/1997; 63(2):171-6. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • Phytotherapy Research - PHYTOTHER RES. 01/1996; 10(8):670-676.
  • M Joyeux, A Lobstein, R Anton, F Mortier
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    ABSTRACT: Ginkgo biloba extract is known to be efficient in diseases associated with free radical generation. This study compares the in vitro effect of some constituents of Ginkgo against lipid peroxidation and cell necrosis of isolated rat hepatocytes, and against superoxide anion which is generally implicated in cell damages.
    Planta Medica 05/1995; 61(2):126-9. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Various researchers have described anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extracts of devil's-claw (Harpagophytum procumbens DC.). In this study the extent of the anti-inflammatory activity of an aqueous extract prepared from cryoground fresh plant and administered intraperitoneally, per os (by gavage), and intraduodenally was determined in rats. The anti-inflammatory properties were assessed by applying the carrageenan-induced edema test. The results obtained indicated that intraperitoneal pretreatment with an aqueous extract of H. procumbens significantly reduced the carrageenan-induced edema at 400 and 800 mg/kg 4 h after carrageenan injection (45 and 65% inhibition, respectively). When administered orally (by gavage), the extracts were inefficient. This result could be attributed to the time in transition in the stomach, where the pH is acidic, causing a decrease of the activity of the extract. This inference is consistent with the results obtained by other authors, showing the absence of extract activity when it was treated in an environment of pH 1 and 37 degrees C (similar to the physicochemical conditions found in the stomach) and then administered intraperitoneally. Intraduodenal pretreatment with the aqueous extract significantly reduced the carrageenan-induced edema at 200, 400, and 1600 mg/kg 6-9 h after carrageenan injection (43, 60, and 41% inhibition, respectively). The presence of extract activity after intraduodenal administration supports the assumption that transition of the extract through the stomach leads to loss of activity.
    Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology 01/1995; 72(12):1532-6. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The dried aqueous extract of Harpagophytum procumbens (Pedaliaceae) and its main iridoid glycoside, harpagoside, have been evaluated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in mice and rats, in order to validate or invalidate the involvement of this compound in such properties. This extract exerted significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, from the dose 100 mg of dried secondary roots/kg, the first being obtained on an acute inflammatory process (carrageenan-induced edema test in rats) and the second being obtained against a chemical stimulus (writhing test in mice). Harpagoside does not appear to be involved in anti-inflammatory properties, since this iridoid glycoside did not protect against carrageenan inflammatory effects when it was used at 5 and 10 mg/kg; 5 mg corresponding to the quantity contained in 400 mg of dried secondary roots. The main iridoid glycoside of H. procumbens appears to be implicated in the peripheral analgesic properties of this species, but other compounds have to be involved, since the dose of 10 mg/kg exerted a significant protective effect. The absence of the activity of H. procumbens after an acid treatment (0.1 N hydrochloric acid), stomach, suggests the use of a suitable galenic preparation in order to protect the active principles from the action of the acid released in the stomach.
    Planta Medica 05/1992; 58(2):117-23. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eschsholzia californica Cham. is a traditional medicinal plant of the Indians used by the rural population of California for its analgesic and sedative properties. Our study on the aqueous extract shows that this plant reduced the behavioural parameters measured in a familiar environment test in mice (novelty preference, locomotion and rearings in two compartments test) at doses above 100 mg/kg and in non-familiar environment tests (staircase test) at doses above 200 mg/kg. This finding validates its traditional sedative properties confirmed by the sleeping induction at doses above 100 mg/kg. Furthermore, when administered at a dose a of 25 mg/kg, E. californica appeared to also have an anxiolytic action since it produced an increase of the number of steps climbed by mice in the staircase test (anticonflict effect) and that of the time spent by animals in the lit box when they were confronted with the light/dark choice situation. Before evaluation of the behavioural effects, it was verified that our aqueous extract did not induce any toxic effect when administered i.p. and p.o.
    Planta Medica 07/1991; 57(3):212-6. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lyophilised aqueous extract of Euphorbia hirta L. (Euphorbiaceae) has been evaluated for analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory properties in mice and rats, in order to complete its activity profile, after the confirmation of the existence of a central depressant activity particularly expressed by a strong sedative effect, associated with anxiolytic effects. This study leads us to the conclusion that this plant extract exerts central analgesic properties. Such a dose-dependent action was obtained against chemical (writhing test) and thermic (hot plate test) stimuli, respectively, from the doses of 20 and 25 mg/kg and it was inhibited by a naloxone pretreatment, a specific morphinic antagonist compound. An antipyretic activity was obtained at the sedative doses of 100 and 400 mg/kg, on the yeast-induced hyperthermia. Finally, significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects were observed on an acute inflammatory process (carrageenan-induced edema test in rats) from the dose of 100 mg/kg. On the other hand, plant extract remained inactive on chronic processes such as Freund's adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis, after a chronic treatment during fourteen days at the daily dose of 200 or 400 mg/kg; however, if inefficacy was observed on rat backpaws edema and on loss of weight, the aqueous extract reduced the inflammatory hyperalgia.
    Planta Medica 07/1991; 57(3):225-31. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dried hydro-alcoholic extract of Peumus boldus (Monimiaceae) has been evaluated for hepatoprotective, choleretic and anti-inflammatory effects in mice and rats, in order to validate or to invalidate traditional therapeutic indications. This extract exerted a significant hepatoprotection of tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced hepatotoxicity in isolated rat hepatocytes (in vitro technique) by reducing the lipid peroxidation and the enzymatic leakage of LDH; this in vitro efficacy was reinforced by a significant hepatoprotection on CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in mice (in vivo technique), the plant extract reducing the enzymatic leakage of ALAT. Boldine, the main alkaloid of P. boldus appears to be implicated in this hepatoprotective activity. Choleretic effects, often mentioned in traditional indications, have not been confirmed in rats. Finally, significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects were obtained on an acute inflammatory process (carrageenan-induced edema test in rats). Boldine does not appear to be involved in such properties.
    Planta Medica 05/1991; 57(2):110-5. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A lyophilised hydroalcoholic extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) has been evaluated for behavioral effects in mice. According to the traditional use of M. officinalis, sedative properties have been confirmed for low doses by the decrease of behavioral parameters measured in a non-familiar environment test (staircase test) and in a familiar environment test (two compartment test). With high doses, a peripheral analgesic activity was obtained by reducing the acetic acid-induced pain (writhing test); moreover, the plant extract induced the sleep in mice after treatment with an infrahypnotic dose of pentobarbital and potentialised the sleep induced by a hypnotic dose of pentobarbital.
    Planta Medica 05/1991; 57(2):105-9. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The traditional uses of minerals drugs and chemical products for medicine were studied in Afghanistan. Twelve medicinal drugs have been identified by chemical investigations and are presented in one table with the vernacular names (in Dari, Pasto and Kati); the origins and the therapeutical uses are listed in another table with their cultural background in pre-Islamic (Greek and Indian medicines) and Islamic pharmacopoeia (Afghano-Persian and Arabian medicines). Twenty-six other mineral drugs are also mentioned.
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology 05/1991; 33(1-2):169-78. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The traditional therapeutic indications for the use of Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae) have been investigated. The lyophilised aqueous extract of roots of M. citrifolia was evaluated for analgesic and behavioural effects in mice. The extract did not exhibit any toxic effects but did show a significant, dose-related, central analgesic activity in the writhing and hotplate tests; this effect was confirmed by the antagonistic action of naloxone. Furthermore, administration of M. citrifolia extract at high dosages decreased all behavioural parameters in the two compartment test, the light/dark choice situation test, and the staircase test; together with the induced sleeping time, these results are suggestive of sedative properties.
    Planta Medica 11/1990; 56(5):430-4. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tert-butyl hydroperoxide induces in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes malonaldehyde formation and lacticodehydrogenase and aspartate amino-transferase leakage. This model, when adapted to crude extracts, permits the demonstration of both anti-lipoperoxidant and antihepatotoxic activity of reference products like quercetin and silymarin and plant extracts like Rosmarinus officinalis and Eschscholzia californica.
    Planta Medica 05/1990; 56(2):171-4. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: According to our results, the traditional therapeutic indications of Eupatorium cannabinum L., choleretic and hepatoprotective effects, have been widely demonstrated. An aqueous extract induces hypercholeresis in the rat, the site of bile formation is canalicular in origin and both bile acid-dependent and bile acid-independent flows could be stimulated; the extract possesses anti-necrotic properties against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity, reducing widely the plasma GPT level in pretreated rats.
    Planta Medica 05/1989; 55(2):127-32. · 2.35 Impact Factor