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Publications (8)20.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Fast-growing chickens have a limited ability to tolerate high temperatures. Thermal manipulation during embryogenesis (TM) has previously been shown to lower chicken body temperature (Tb) at hatching and to improve thermotolerance until market age, possibly resulting from changes in metabolic regulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of TM (12 h/d, 39.5°C, 65% RH from d 7 to 16 of embryogenesis vs. 37.8°C, 56% RH continuously) and of a subsequent heat challenge (32°C for 5 h at 34 d) on the mRNA expression of metabolic genes and cell signaling in the Pectoralis major muscle and the liver. Gene expression was analyzed by RT-qPCR in 8 chickens per treatment, characterized by low Tb in the TM groups and high Tb in the control groups. Data were analyzed using the general linear model of SAS considering TM and heat challenge within TM as main effects. TM had significant long-term effects on thyroid hormone metabolism by decreasing the muscle mRNA expression of deiodinase DIO3. Under standard rearing conditions, the expression of several genes involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, such as transcription factor PGC-1α, was affected by TM in the muscle, whereas for other genes regulating mitochondrial function and muscle growth, TM seemed to mitigate the decrease induced by the heat challenge. TM increased DIO2 mRNA expression in the liver (only at 21°C) and reduced the citrate synthase activity involved in the Krebs cycle. The phosphorylation level of p38 Mitogen-activated-protein kinase regulating the cell stress response was higher in the muscle of TM groups compared to controls. In conclusion, markers of energy utilization and growth were either changed by TM in the Pectoralis major muscle and the liver by thermal manipulation during incubation as a possible long-term adaptation limiting energy metabolism, or mitigated during heat challenge.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(9):e105339. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chickens mimic an insulin-resistance state by exhibiting several peculiarities with regard to plasma glucose level and its control by insulin. To gain insight into the role of insulin in the control of chicken transcriptome, liver and leg muscle transcriptomes were compared in fed controls and "diabetic" chickens, at 5 h after insulin immuno-neutralization, using 20.7K-chicken oligo-microarrays. At a level of false discovery rate <0.01, 1,573 and 1,225 signals were significantly modified by insulin privation in liver and muscle, respectively. Microarray data agreed reasonably well with qRT-PCR and some protein level measurements. Differentially expressed mRNAs with human ID were classified using Biorag analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Multiple metabolic pathways, structural proteins, transporters and proteins of intracellular trafficking, major signaling pathways, and elements of the transcriptional control machinery were largely represented in both tissues. At least 42 mRNAs have already been associated with diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, energy expenditure, or identified as sensors of metabolism in mice or humans. The contribution of the pathways presently identified to chicken physiology (particularly those not yet related to insulin) needs to be evaluated in future studies. Other challenges include the characterization of "unknown" mRNAs and the identification of the steps or networks, which disturbed tissue transcriptome so extensively, quickly after the turning off of the insulin signal. In conclusion, pleiotropic effects of insulin in chickens are further evidenced; major pathways controlled by insulin in mammals have been conserved despite the presence of unique features of insulin signaling in chicken muscle.
    Physiological Genomics 01/2012; 44(5):283-92. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The avian uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3), mainly expressed in muscle tissue, could be involved in fatty acid (FA) metabolism, limitation of reactive oxygen species production, and/or nonshivering thermogenesis. We recently demonstrated that UCP3 mRNA expression was increased by isoproterenol (Iso), a β-agonist, in chicken Pectoralis major. This upregulation was associated with changes in FA metabolism and variations in the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and in the expression of the transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms involving AMPK and PPARα in UCP3 regulation in primary cultures of chick myoblasts. Avian UCP3 mRNA expression, associated with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation, was increased by Iso and/or FAs. The PKA pathway mediated the effects of Iso on UCP3 expression. FA stimulation also led to AMPK activation. Furthermore, the direct involvement of AMPK on UCP3 regulation was shown by using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxyamide ribonucleoside and Compound C. The use of the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190, which was associated with AMPK activation, also dramatically enhanced UCP3 mRNA expression. Finally the PPARα agonist WY-14643 strongly increased UCP3 mRNA expression. This study highlights the control of UCP3 expression by the β-adrenergic system and FA in chick myoblasts and demonstrates that its expression is directly regulated by AMPK and by PPARα. Overexpression of avian UCP3 might modulate energy utilization or limit oxidative stress when mitochondrial metabolism of FA is triggered by catecholamines.
    AJP Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology 04/2011; 301(1):R201-8. · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) is orthologous to UCP3, which is suggested to be involved in fatty acid metabolism and to limit the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species in mammals. In the chicken, the role and regulation of avUCP remain to be clarified. The aim of this study was to explore the control of avUCP expression by the beta-adrenergic system, known to be involved in avian thermoregulation and lipid utilization, and in UCP expression in mammals. Therefore, we measured the expression of avUCP mRNA and protein in the Pectoralis major muscle of chickens injected with the beta(2) agonist isoproterenol, and we investigated the potential pathways involved in the regulation of avUCP mRNA expression. Avian UCP mRNA expression was increased 7-fold 4h after isoproterenol injection, leading to a tendency to a 40% increase in avUCP protein 24h post-injection. This increase was preceded, 30 min after isoproterenol injection, by changes in the chicken thyroid status and in the muscular expression of PPARalpha, PPARbeta/delta, and PPARgamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). Moreover, the analysis of the avUCP promoter sequence suggested potential binding sites for PPARs and for thyroid hormone receptors. We also detected the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, which has recently been reported to be involved in UCP3 regulation in mammals. This study presents for the first time evidence of beta-adrenergic control on avUCP messenger expression in chicken muscle and suggests the potential involvement of AMPK and several transcription factors in this regulation.
    Domestic animal endocrinology 09/2009; 38(2):115-25. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We recently provided evidence of the presence of glucokinase (GCK) in the chicken liver [Berradi, H., Taouis, M., Cassy, S., Rideau, N., 2005. Glucokinase in chicken (Gallus gallus). Partial cDNA cloning, immunodetection and activity determination. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. B Biochem. Mol. Biol. 141, 129-139]. In the present study we addressed the question of whether nutritional regulation of GCK occurs. Several nutritional conditions were compared in chickens (5 weeks old) previously trained to meal-feeding. One group was left in the fasted state (F: 24h) and one was tested at the end of the 2h meal (refed: RF). Two other 2h meal-refed groups received an acute oral saccharose load (6ml/kg BW) just before the 2h meal and were sacrificed either at the end of the meal (Saccharose refed, SRF) or 3h later (SRF+3). Liver GCK mRNA and protein levels did not differ between F, RF and SRF chickens but were significantly increased in SRF+3 chickens (2-fold, p<0.05). GCK activity did not differ between F and RF chickens but increased significantly in SRF and SRF+3 chickens (1.7-fold, p<0.05). Chicken liver GCK expression (mRNA and protein) and activity were therefore inducible in these chickens by feeding a meal with acute oral administration of carbohydrate. These and recent findings demonstrating insulin dependency of the liver GCK mRNA and protein strongly suggest that GCK may have an important role in carbohydrate metabolism, including that of the chicken. However, even in these highly stimulatory conditions, liver GCK activity remained relatively low in comparison with other species. The latter result may partly explain the high plasma glucose level in the chicken.
    General and Comparative Endocrinology 10/2008; 158(2):173-7. · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was aimed at evaluating the molecular mechanisms associated with the differences in muscle glycogen content and breast meat quality between 2 experimental lines of chicken divergently selected on abdominal fatness. The glycogen at death (estimated through the glycolytic potential) of the pectoralis major muscle and the quality of the resulting meat were estimated in the 2 lines. The fat chickens exhibited greater glycolytic potential, and in turn lower ultimate pH than the lean chickens. Consequently, the breast meat of fat birds was paler and less colored (i.e., less red and yellow), and exhibited greater drip loss compared with that of lean birds. In relation to these variations, transcription and activation levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were investigated. The main difference observed between lines was a 3-fold greater level of AMPK activation, evaluated through phosphorylation of AMPKalpha-(Thr(172)), in the muscle of lean birds. At the transcriptional level, data indicated concomitant down- and upregulation for the gamma1 and gamma2 AMPK subunit isoforms, respectively, in the muscle of lean chickens. Transcriptional levels of enzymes directly involved in glycogen turnover were also investigated. Data showed greater gene expression for glycogen synthase, glycogen phosphorylase, and the gamma subunit of phosphorylase kinase in lean birds. Together, these data indicate that selection on body fatness in chicken alters the muscle glycogen turnover and content and consequently the quality traits of the resulting meat. Alterations of AMPK activity could play a key role in these changes.
    Journal of Animal Science 08/2008; 86(11):2888-96. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In order to evaluate the role of insulin in chicken, an insulin immuno-neutralization was performed. Fed chickens received 1 or 3 i.v. injections of anti-insulin serum (2-h intervals), while fed or fasted controls received normal serum. Measurements included insulin signaling cascade (at 1 h in liver and muscle), metabolic or endocrine plasma parameters (at 1 and 5 h), and qRT-PCR analysis (at 5 h) of 23 genes involved in endocrine regulation, metabolisms, and transcription. Most plasma parameters and food intake were altered by insulin privation as early as 1 h and largely at 5 h. The initial steps of insulin signaling pathways including insulin receptor (IR), IR substrate-1 (IRS-1), and Src homology collagen and downstream elements: phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, GSK3, ERK2, and S6 ribosomal protein) were accordingly turned off in the liver. In the muscle, IR, IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and PI3K activity remained unchanged, whereas several subsequent steps were altered by insulin privation. In both tissues, AMPK was not altered. In the liver, insulin privation decreased Egr1, PPAR gamma, SREBP1, THRSP alpha (spot 14), D2-deiodinase, glucokinase (GK), and fatty acid synthase (whereas D3-deiodinase and IGF-binding protein 1 transcripts were up-regulated. Liver SREBP1 and GK and plasma IGFBP1 proteins were accordingly down- and up-regulated. In the muscle, PPAR beta delta and atrogin-1 mRNA increased and Egr1 mRNA decreased. Changes in messengers were partly mimicked by fasting. Thus, insulin signaling in muscle is peculiar in chicken and is strictly dependent on insulin in fed status. The 'diabetic' status induced by insulin immuno-neutralization is accompanied by impairments of glucagon secretion, thyroid axis, and expression of several genes involved in regulatory pathways or metabolisms, evidencing pleiotropic effects of insulin in fed chicken.
    Journal of Endocrinology 07/2008; 197(3):531-42. · 4.06 Impact Factor
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