Ellen van Weert

University of Groningen, Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands

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Publications (33)72.57 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mediating mechanisms of a 12-week group-based exercise intervention on cancer survivors' quality of life (QoL) were examined to inform future exercise intervention development. Two hundred nine cancer survivors ≥3 months posttreatment (57% breast cancer) aged 49.5 (±10.4) years were assigned to physical exercise (n = 147) or wait-list control (n = 62). QoL, fatigue, emotional distress, physical activity, general self-efficacy and mastery were assessed at baseline and post-intervention using questionnaires. Path analysis was conducted using Mplus to explore whether improved physical activity, general self-efficacy and mastery mediated the effects of exercise on fatigue and distress and consequently QoL. The intervention was associated with increased physical activity (β = 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.14;0.59), general self-efficacy (β = 2.41, 95%CI = 0.35;4.73), and mastery (β = 1.75, 95%CI = 0.36;2.78). Further, the intervention had both a direct effect on fatigue (β = -1.09, 95%CI = -2.12;0.01), and an indirect effect (β = -0.54, 95%CI = -1.00;-0.21) via physical activity (β = -0.29, 95%CI = -0.64;-0.07) and general self-efficacy (β = -0.25, 95%CI = -0.61;-0.05). The intervention had a borderline significant direct effect on reduced distress (β =-1.32, 95%CI =-2.68;0.11), and a significant indirect effect via increased general self-efficacy and mastery (β =-1.06, 95%CI =-1.89;-0.38). Reductions in fatigue (β =-1.33, 95%CI =-1.85;-0.83) and distress (β =-0.86, 95%CI =-1.25;-0.52) were associated with improved QoL. Further, increased physical activity was directly associated with improved QoL (β = 3.37, 95%CI = 1.01;5.54). The beneficial effect of group-based physical exercise on QoL was mediated by increased physical activity, general self-efficacy and mastery, and subsequent reductions in fatigue and distress. In addition to physical activity, future interventions should target self-efficacy and mastery. This may lead to reduced distress and fatigue, and consequently improved QoL of cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Psycho-Oncology 10/2013; · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: (1) To explore participation in leisure time physical activities (LTPAs) in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) compared with children developing typically. (2) To examine the association between participation in LTPA and aerobic fitness. Thirty-eight children with DCD (aged 7-12 years) were age and gender matched with 38 children developing typically. Participation in LTPA was self-administered by using an activity questionnaire, and aerobic fitness was estimated using a Shuttle Run Test. Children with DCD spent significantly less time in overall, nonorganized, and vigorous LTPA compared with children developing typically. Aerobic fitness was significantly lower for children with DCD. The best model, including age, group, and overall LTPA, explained 46.2% of the variance in aerobic fitness. Suitable physical activities should be fostered in children with DCD, who have a low participation rate and aerobic fitness level.
    Pediatric physical therapy: the official publication of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association 01/2013; 25(4):422-9.
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    ABSTRACT: : To compare components of health-related physical fitness between Dutch children with clinically diagnosed developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and typically developing children (TDC), and to examine associations between motor performance problems and components of health-related fitness in children with DCD. : A multicenter case-control study was used to compare health-related physical fitness in children with DCD (N = 38; age, 7-12 years; 10 girls and 28 boys) with that in age- and gender-matched TDC. Motor coordination problems (manual dexterity, ball and balance skills) were assessed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children. Health-related physical fitness was indicated by (1) cardiorespiratory fitness, (2) muscle strength, and (3) body mass index. : Significantly lower values of cardiorespiratory fitness (6.7% lower maximal cardiorespiratory fitness) were found in children with DCD compared with TDC. Extension and flexion of the elbow and flexion of the knee were also significantly lower (by 15.3%, 16.7%, and 18.4%, respectively) in DCD children compared with TDC. A significant negative and large association was found between cardiorespiratory fitness and balance performance. : Lower cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength in children with clinically diagnosed DCD compared with TDC support the importance of examining and training cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength, besides the regular attention for motor coordination problems.
    Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP 10/2012; 33(8):649-55. · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence supports the use of educational and physical training programs for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a group-based exercise and educational program on the physical performance and disease self-management of people with RA. This was a randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted at a rehabilitation center in the Netherlands. Thirty-four people diagnosed with RA participated in the study. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n=19) or a waiting list control group (n=15). The intervention in this study was an 8-week, multidisciplinary, group therapy program for people with RA, consisting of physical exercise designed to increase aerobic capacity and muscle strength (force-generating capacity) together with an educational program to improve health status and self-efficacy for disease-self-management. The main outcome measures were maximum oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max), muscle strength of the elbow and knee flexors and extensors, health status, and perceived self-efficacy. All data were recorded before intervention in week 1, after intervention in week 9, and at follow-up in week 22. The intervention group showed significant improvement (12.1%) in Vo(2)max at week 9 compared with the control group (-1.7%). Although significant within-group changes were found over time for muscle strength of the upper and lower extremities and health status that favored the intervention group, no between-group changes were found regarding these outcomes. An important limitation was the small number of participants included in our study, which may have resulted in a lack of power. The present group-based exercise and educational program for people with RA had a beneficial effect on aerobic capacity but not on muscle strength, health status, or self-efficacy.
    Physical Therapy 06/2011; 91(6):879-93. · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We tested the effects on problem-solving, anxiety and depression of 12-week group-based self-management cancer rehabilitation, combining comprehensive physical training (PT) and cognitive-behavioural problem-solving training (CBT), compared with PT. We expected that PT + CBT would outperform PT in improvements in problem-solving (Social Problem-Solving Inventory-Revised (SPSI-R)), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)), and that more anxious and/or depressed participants would benefit most from adding CBT to PT. Cancer survivors (aged 48.8 ± 10.9 years, all cancer types, medical treatment completed) were randomly assigned to PT + CBT (n = 76) or PT (n = 71). Measurement occasions were: before and post-rehabilitation (12 weeks), 3- and 9-month follow-up. A non-randomised usual care comparison group (UCC) (n = 62) was measured at baseline and after 12 weeks. Longitudinal intention-to-treat analyses showed no differential pattern in change between PT + CBT and PT. Post-rehabilitation, participants in PT and PT + CBT reported within-group improvements in problem-solving (negative problem orientation; p < 0.01), anxiety (p < 0.001) and depression (p < 0.001), which were maintained at 3- and 9-month follow-up (p < 0.05). Compared with UCC post-rehabilitation, PT and PT + CBT only improved in anxiety (p < 0.05). CBT did not add to the effects of PT and had no extra benefits for higher distressed participants. PT was feasible and sufficient for durably reducing cancer survivors' anxiety.
    Psychology & Health 10/2010; 26 Suppl 1:63-82. · 1.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancer-related fatigue of physical training combined with cognitive behavioral therapy with physical training alone and with no intervention. In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, 147 survivors of cancer were randomly assigned to a group that received physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy (PT+CBT group, n=76) or to a group that received physical training alone (PT group, n=71). In addition, a nonintervention control group (WLC group) consisting of 62 survivors of cancer who were on the waiting lists of rehabilitation centers elsewhere was included. The study was conducted at 4 rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands. All patients were survivors of cancer. Physical training consisting of 2 hours of individual training and group sports took place twice weekly, and cognitive-behavioral therapy took place once weekly for 2 hours. Fatigue was assessed with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory before and immediately after intervention (12 weeks after enrollment). The WLC group completed questionnaires at the same time points. Baseline fatigue did not differ significantly among the 3 groups. Over time, levels of fatigue significantly decreased in all domains in all groups, except in mental fatigue in the WLC group. Analyses of variance of postintervention fatigue showed statistically significant group effects on general fatigue, on physical and mental fatigue, and on reduced activation but not on reduced motivation. Compared with the WLC group, the PT group reported significantly greater decline in 4 domains of fatigue, whereas the PT+CBT group reported significantly greater decline in physical fatigue only. No significant differences in decline in fatigue were found between the PT+CBT and PT groups. Physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy and physical training alone had significant and beneficial effects on fatigue compared with no intervention. Physical training was equally effective as or more effective than physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy in reducing cancer-related fatigue, suggesting that cognitive-behavioral therapy did not have additional beneficial effects beyond the benefits of physical training.
    Physical Therapy 10/2010; 90(10):1413-25. · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the use of a submaximal exercise test in detecting change in fitness level after a physical training program, and to investigate the correlation of outcomes as measured submaximally or maximally. A prospective study in which exercise testing was performed before and after training intervention. Academic and general hospital and rehabilitation center. Cancer survivors (N=147) (all cancer types, medical treatment completed > or =3 mo ago) attended a 12-week supervised exercise program. A 12-week training program including aerobic training, strength training, and group sport. Outcome measures were changes in peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)peak) and peak power output (both determined during exhaustive exercise testing) and submaximal heart rate (determined during submaximal testing at a fixed workload). The Vo(2)peak and peak power output increased and the submaximal heart rate decreased significantly from baseline to postintervention (P<.001). Changes in submaximal heart rate were only weakly correlated with changes in Vo(2)peak and peak power output. Comparing the participants performing submaximal testing with a heart rate less than 140 beats per minute (bpm) versus the participants achieving a heart rate of 140 bpm or higher showed that changes in submaximal heart rate in the group cycling with moderate to high intensity (ie, heart rate > or =140 bpm) were clearly related to changes in VO(2)peak and peak power output. For the monitoring of training progress in daily clinical practice, changes in heart rate at a fixed submaximal workload that requires a heart rate greater than 140 bpm may serve as an alternative to an exhaustive exercise test.
    Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation 03/2010; 91(3):351-7. · 2.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are less physically active than healthy peers. Therefore, we developed an Internet-based intervention to improve physical activity (PA). The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the program in improving PA. PA was determined by activity-related energy expenditure, PA level, time spent on moderate to vigorous PA, and the number of days with > or =1 hour of moderate to vigorous activity, and was assessed with a 7-day activity diary. Aerobic exercise capacity was assessed by means of a Bruce treadmill test and was recorded as maximum endurance time. Disease activity was assessed by using the JIA core set. Adherence was electronically monitored. Of 59 patients, 33 eligible patients were included and randomized in an intervention (n = 17, mean +/- SD age 10.6 +/- 1.5 years) or control waiting-list group (n = 16, mean +/- SD age 10.8 +/- 1.4 years). All patients completed baseline and T1 testing. PA significantly improved in both groups. Maximum endurance time significantly improved in the intervention group but not in the control group. In a subgroup analysis for patients with low PA (intervention: n = 7, control: n = 5), PA improved in the intervention group but not in the control group. The intervention was safe, feasible, and showed a good adherence. An Internet-based program for children with JIA ages 8-12 years directed at promoting PA in daily life effectively improves PA in those patients with low PA levels. It is also able to improve endurance and it is safe, feasible, and has good adherence.
    Arthritis care & research. 01/2010; 62(5):697-703.
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    ABSTRACT: Trismus is a common problem after treatment of head and neck cancer. The Therabite is an effective treatment for trismus. To explore the factors that may influence Therabite exercise adherence, how these interrelate and to provide aims for interventions to increase adherence, the authors conducted a multi-centre, formal-evaluative qualitative retrospective study. 21 patients treated for head-neck cancer were interviewed in semi-structured, in-depth interviews. Internal motivation to exercise, the perceived effect, self-discipline and having a clear exercise goal influenced Therabite exercise adherence positively. Perceiving no effect, limitation in Therabite opening range and reaching the exercise goal or a plateau in mouth opening were negative influences. Pain, anxiety and the physiotherapist could influence adherence both positively and negatively. Based on the results, a model for Therabite exercise adherence was proposed. It is important to signal and assess the factors negatively influencing Therabite adherence, specifically before there is a perceived effect. Research is needed to examine why some patients do not achieve results despite high exercise adherence, to identify effective exercise regimens and to assess proposed interventions aimed to increase Therabite exercise adherence.
    International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 06/2009; 38(9):947-54. · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore physical activity (PA) in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared with a healthy population and to examine associations between PA and disease-related factors. Total energy expenditure (TEE), activity-related energy expenditure (AEE), PA level, and PA pattern were assessed with a 3-day activity diary. Aerobic capacity was assessed using a Symptom Limited Bicycle Ergometry test. Functional ability was assessed with the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire. Disease activity was assessed using Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation core set criteria. Overall well-being was measured using a visual analog scale, and time since diagnosis was assessed by retrospective study from patients' charts. We used a cross-sectional study design. Reference data were collected from healthy Dutch secondary school children. Thirty patients and 106 controls were included (mean+/-SD age 17.0+/-0.6 and 16.7+/-0.9 years, respectively). TEE, AEE, and PA level were significantly lower in the JIA group. The JIA group spent more time in bed and less time on moderate to vigorous PA. Only 23% of the JIA patients met public health recommendations to perform >or=1 hour daily moderate to vigorous PA compared with 66% in the reference group. Higher PA was associated with higher levels of well-being and maximal oxygen consumption. Adolescents with JIA have low PA levels and are at risk of losing the benefits of PA. Low PA is not related to disease activity, and control over the disease does not restore previous PA levels. Interventions by pediatric rheumatologists are needed to increase PA levels in patients with JIA.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 11/2008; 59(10):1379-84. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We compared the effect of a 12-week group-based multidisciplinary self-management rehabilitation program, combining physical training (twice weekly) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (once weekly) with the effect of 12-week group-based physical training (twice weekly) on cancer survivors' quality of life over a 1-year period. One hundred forty-seven survivors [48.8 +/- 10.9 years (mean +/- SD), all cancer types, medical treatment > or = 3 months ago] were randomly assigned to either physical training (PT, n = 71) or to physical training plus cognitive-behavioral therapy (PT + CBT, n = 76). Quality of life and physical activity levels were measured before and immediately after the intervention and at 3- and 9-month post-intervention using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 questionnaire and the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly, respectively. Multilevel linear mixed-effects models revealed no differential pattern in change of quality of life and physical activity between PT and PT + CBT. In both PT and PT + CBT, quality of life and physical activity were significantly and clinically relevantly improved immediately following the intervention and also at 3- and 9-month post-intervention compared to pre-intervention (p < 0.001). Self-management physical training had substantial and durable positive effects on cancer survivors' quality of life. Participants maintained physical activity levels once the program was completed. Combining physical training with our cognitive-behavioral intervention did not add to these beneficial effects of physical training neither in the short-term nor in the long-term. Physical training should be implemented within the framework of standard care for cancer survivors.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 10/2008; 17(6):653-63. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the development of a physical training programme for cancer patients. Four related but conceptually and empirically distinct physical problems are described: decreased aerobic capacity, decreased muscle strength, fatigue and impaired role physical functioning. The study aimed to identify the optimal content for an exercise programme that addresses these four physical problems, based on the highest level of evidence available. The study further aimed to review the evidence available on the delivery of the programmes. The final goal was to develop a programme in which content and delivery are based on the best available evidence. Literature searches (PUBMED and MEDLINE, to July 2006) on content looked for evidence about the efficacy of exercise on aerobic capacity, muscle strength, fatigue and impaired role physical functioning. Literature searches on delivery looked for self-management and/or self-efficacy enhancing techniques in relation to outcome, adherence to and/or adoption of a physically active lifestyle. Evidence on the effectiveness of exercise in cancer patients varies and increases when moving from muscle strength (RCT level), fatigue and physical role functioning to aerobic capacity (all at the meta-analysis level). Effect sizes for aerobic capacity were moderate, while effect sizes for fatigue and physical role functioning were zero and/or small. Many of the studies have significant methodological shortcomings. There was some evidence (meta-analyses) that self-management programmes and self-efficacy enhancing programmes have beneficial effects on health outcomes in a variety of chronic diseases, on the quality of life in cancer patients, and on exercise adherence and later exercise behaviour. Limited data are available on the effectiveness of exercise for cancer patients. Although evidence supports the positive effects of exercise on exercise capacity during and after completion of cancer treatment, the effects for fatigue and role functioning are ambiguous. Evidence on the effectiveness of progressive exercise training on muscle strength is promising. In addition, some evidence supports the positive effects of self-management programmes and self-efficacy enhancing programmes on health outcomes, exercise adherence and later exercise behaviour. The resulting programme was developed on the basis of the highest quality of evidence available regarding content and delivery. The content is based on information obtained from the present review, and on the recommendations of the American College of Sports Medicine. Potential advantages of the programme include: (a) tailored physical training towards focusing on the patient's established problems and (b) delivery of the training as a self-management programme that might have beneficial effects on health outcome, exercise adherence and a long-term physically active lifestyle.
    Patient Education and Counseling 06/2008; 71(2):169-90. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To conduct a randomized controlled trial and compare the effects on cancer survivors' quality of life in a 12-week group-based multidisciplinary self-management rehabilitation program, combining physical training (twice weekly) and cognitive-behavioral training (once weekly) with those of a 12-week group-based physical training (twice weekly). In addition, both interventions were compared with no intervention. Participants (all cancer types, medical treatment completed > or = 3 months ago) were randomly assigned to multidisciplinary rehabilitation (n = 76) or physical training (n = 71). The nonintervention comparison group consisted of 62 patients on a waiting list. Quality of life was measured using the RAND-36. The rehabilitation groups were measured at baseline, after rehabilitation, and 3-month follow-up, and the nonintervention group was measured at baseline and 12 weeks later. The effects of multidisciplinary rehabilitation did not outperform those of physical training in role limitations due to emotional problem (primary outcome) or any other domains of quality of life (all p > .05). Compared with no intervention, participants in both rehabilitation groups showed significant and clinically relevant improvements in role limitations due to physical problem (primary outcome; effect size (ES) = 0.66), and in physical functioning (ES = 0.48), vitality (ES = 0.54), and health change (ES = 0.76) (all p < .01). Adding a cognitive-behavioral training to group-based self-management physical training did not have additional beneficial effects on cancer survivors' quality of life. Compared with the nonintervention group, the group-based self-management rehabilitation improved cancer survivors' quality of life.
    Psychosomatic Medicine 05/2008; 70(4):422-9. · 4.08 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 01/2008; 6:1-1. · 1.47 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 01/2008; 6. · 1.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We compared the effect of a group-based 12-week supervised exercise programme, i.e. aerobic and resistance exercise, and group sports, with that of the same programme combined with cognitive-behavioural training on physical fitness and activity of cancer survivors. One hundred and forty seven cancer survivors (all cancer types, medical treatment >or=3 months ago)were randomly assigned to physical training (PT, n=71) or PT plus cognitive-behavioural training (PT+CBT, n=76). Maximal aerobic capacity, muscle strength and physical activity were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Analyses using multilevel linear mixed-effects models showed that cancer survivors' physical fitness increased significantly in PT and PT+CBT from baseline to post-intervention. Changes did not differ between PT and PT+CBT. Physical fitness of cancer survivors was improved following an intensive physical training programme. Adding a structured cognitive-behavioural intervention did not enhance the effect.
    Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden) 01/2008; 47(5):825-34. · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Group-based physical training interventions have been shown to be effective in increasing quality of life in cancer survivors. Until now, however, the impact of cohesion within the group on intervention outcome has not been investigated. We examined self-reported individual group cohesion ratings collected in the first half of a 12-week rehabilitation programme for cancer survivors (N=132). Four dimensions of group cohesion were measured, i.e. the bond with the group as whole, the bond with other members, cooperation within the group and the instrumental value. Quality of life, physical functioning and fatigue were assessed before and after the intervention using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30. Linear multiple multivariate regression analysis was conducted to explore the relationship between group cohesion and intervention outcome. The relationship between group cohesion and outcome was significantly modified by gender. Higher ratings of cooperation within the group predicted better post-intervention quality of life and physical functioning and less fatigue in men, and better quality of life and physical functioning in women. Additionally, women who reported a stronger bond with other members showed a lower quality of life after the intervention. No relationship was found between the instrumental value and the outcome variables. Some dimensions of group cohesion seem to be associated with intervention outcome. The underlying mechanisms need to be unravelled.
    Psycho-Oncology 12/2007; 17(9):917-25. · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals, and to assess associations between disease-related variables and aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity. Of 25 patients enrolled in a JIA transition outpatient clinic, 22 patients with JIA were included in this study (mean +/- SD age 17.1 +/- 0.7 years, range 16-18 years). Aerobic capacity was examined using a Symptom Limited Bicycle Ergometry test. Anaerobic capacity was assessed with the Wingate Anaerobic Test. Functional ability was assessed with the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire. Pain and overall well-being were measured using a visual analog scale. Disease duration and disease activity were also assessed. Absolute and relative maximal oxygen consumption in the JIA group were significantly impaired (85% and 83% for boys, respectively; 81% and 78% for girls, respectively) compared with healthy controls. Mean power was also significantly impaired (88% for boys and 74% for girls), whereas peak power was significantly impaired for girls and just failed significance for boys (67% for girls and 92% for boys). A post hoc analysis correcting for underweight and overweight demonstrated that body composition did not influence the results substantially. This study demonstrated that adolescents with JIA have an impaired aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity compared with healthy age- and sex-matched peers. The likely cause for this significant impairment is multifactorial and needs to be revealed to improve treatment strategies.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 09/2007; · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: After lung transplantation (LTx) exercise capacity frequently remains limited, despite significantly improved pulmonary function. The aim of this study was to evaluate maximal exercise capacity and peripheral muscle force before and 1 year after LTx, and to determine whether peripheral muscle force and lactate threshold (LT) limit exercise capacity 1 year after LTx. Twenty-five subjects (mean age 43 years, 8 women and 17 men, 4 single-lung transplantations) were included in the study. Measurements included maximal exercise capacity, lactate threshold (symptom-limited bicycle ergometer test) and muscle force test (hand-held dynamometer) were performed before and 1 year after LTx. Before LTx, all patients showed severe exercise intolerance (mean +/- SD): work capacity (W(peak)), 11.6 +/- 18 W; peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)), 8.6 +/- 3.6 ml/min/kg. After LTx, exercise capacity improved significantly: W(peak), 69 +/- 27 W (p < 0.001); peak Vo(2), 15.7 +/- 4.3 ml/min/kg (p < 0.001). Ventilatory factors did not appear to limit exercise capacity. Quadriceps muscle force pre- vs post-LTx was: 248 +/- 73 N vs 281 +/- 68 N (p < 0.05). Post-LTx, a significant correlation was found between LT and exercise capacity (r = 0.76, p < 0.001), between muscle force and exercise capacity (r = 0.41, p < 0.05) and between the LT and muscle force (r = 0.53, p < 0.01). The occurrence of an early and pathologic LT and peripheral muscle weakness contributes to the limitation of exercise capacity and reflects a peripheral deficit post-LTx.
    The Journal of heart and lung transplantation: the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation 12/2006; 25(11):1310-6. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of the study were to examine the effects of a multidimensional rehabilitation program on cancer-related fatigue, to examine concurrent predictors of fatigue, and to investigate whether change in fatigue over time was associated with change in predictors. Sample: 72 cancer survivors with different diagnoses. Setting: rehabilitation center. Intervention: 15-week rehabilitation program. Measures: Fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory), demographic and disease/treatment-related variables, body composition (bioelectrical impedance), exercise capacity (symptom-limited bicycle ergometry), muscle force (handheld dynamometry), physical and psychological symptom distress (Rotterdam Symptom Check List), experienced physical and psychological functioning (RAND-36), and self-efficacy (General-Self-Efficacy Scale, Dutch version). Measurements were performed before (T0) and after rehabilitation (T1). At T1 (n = 56), significant improvements in fatigue were found, with effect sizes varying from -0.35 to -0.78. At T0, the different dimensions of fatigue were predicted by different physical and psychological variables. Explained variance of change in fatigue varied from 42%-58% and was associated with pre-existing fatigue and with change in physical functioning, role functioning due to physical problems, psychological functioning, and physical symptoms distress. Within this selected group of patients we found that (a) rehabilitation is effective in reducing fatigue, (b) both physical and psychological parameters predicted different dimensions of fatigue at baseline, and (c) change in fatigue was mainly associated with change in physical parameters.
    The Oncologist 03/2006; 11(2):184-96. · 4.10 Impact Factor