Elizabeth K. Mahony

Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Dwingelo, Drenthe, Netherlands

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Publications (31)85.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We present the results of an all-sky radio survey between 5 and 9 GHz of the fields surrounding all unassociated gamma-ray objects listed in the Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog (2FGL). The observations were conducted in two steps, first observations with the Very Large Array and the Australia Telescope Compact Array provided localizations of weak radio point sources found in 2FGL fields at arcmin scales. Then a subset of those were followed-up with the Very Long Baseline and the Long Baseline Arrays providing detections at sub-arcsecond resolution. In total we found 865 radio sources at arcsec scales as candidates for association. Our association method is based on the fact that bright VLBI detected compact radio sources with milli-arcsecond structures are rare objects. We quantified association probabilities based on known statistics of source counts and assuming a uniform distribution of background sources. We thus report firm associations for 76 previously unknown gamma-ray active galactic nuclei based on sub-arcsec scale detections. Comparison of these new AGN associations with the predictions from using the WISE color-color diagram shows that using the color-color diagram misses half of the associations. In addition, we found that in 129 out of 588 observed gamma-ray sources not a single radio continuum source was detected above our sensitivity limit within the 3-sigma gamma-ray localization. These 'empty' fields were found to be concentrated around the innermost region of the galactic plane and we suggest that they are associated with an as yet unrecognized galactic population of gamma-ray emitters.
    08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Millisecond radio pulsars acquire their rapid rotation rates through mass and angular momentum transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary system. Recent studies of PSR J1824-2452I and PSR J1023+0038 have observationally demonstrated this link, and they have also shown that such systems can repeatedly transition back-and-forth between the radio millisecond pulsar and low-mass X-ray binary states. This also suggests that a fraction of such systems are not newly born radio millisecond pulsars but are rather suspended in a back-and-forth state switching phase, perhaps for giga-years. XSS J12270-4859 has been previously suggested to be a low-mass X-ray binary, and until recently the only such system to be seen at MeV-GeV energies. We present radio, optical and X-ray observations that offer compelling evidence that XSS J12270-4859 is a low-mass X-ray binary which transitioned to a radio millisecond pulsar state between 2012 November 14 and 2012 December 21. Though radio pulsations remain to be detected, we use optical and X-ray photometry/spectroscopy to show that the system has undergone a sudden dimming and no longer shows evidence for an accretion disk. The optical observations constrain the orbital period to 6.913+-0.002 hr.
    02/2014; 441(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The Fermi Large Area Telescope catalogue 2FGL lists 1872 objects. More than half of them are Active Galatic Nuclei (AGNs) with strong parsec-scale radio emission detectable with VLBI. But 30% of Fermi sources do not have associations and their nature is a mystery. For solving this mystery we launched a project of observing the fields around unassociated sources first with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and then following up detected objects with VLBI. This approach allows us to find those gamma-ray sources that are associated with AGNs brighter than 10-20 mJy. Analysis of the completeness of all-sky VLBI surveys shows that the number of bright radio sources with emission from parsec scales is small enough to make the probability of detection of an unrelated object within the Fermi localisation error ellipse negligible. We discuss the status of the program and preliminary results. Early results suggest there exists a population of radio quiet gamma-ray sources not associated with AGNs that show a greater concentration towards the galactic plane.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present a CO(1-0) survey for cold molecular gas in a representative sample of 13 high-z radio galaxies (HzRGs) at 1.4<z<2.8, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect CO(1-0) emission associated with five sources: MRC 0114-211, MRC 0152-209, MRC 0156-252, MRC 1138-262 and MRC 2048-272. The CO(1-0) luminosities are in the range $L'_{\rm CO} \sim (5 - 9) \times 10^{10}$ K km/s pc$^{2}$. For MRC 0152-209 and MRC 1138-262 part of the CO(1-0) emission coincides with the radio galaxy, while part is spread on scales of tens of kpc and likely associated with galaxy mergers. The molecular gas mass derived for these two systems is M$_{\rm H2} \sim 6 \times 10^{10}\, {\rm M}_{\odot}$ (M$_{\rm H2}$/$L'_{\rm CO}$=0.8). For the remaining three CO-detected sources, the CO(1-0) emission is located in the halo (~50-kpc) environment. These three HzRGs are among the fainter far-IR emitters in our sample, suggesting that similar reservoirs of cold molecular halo gas may have been missed in earlier studies due to pre-selection of IR-bright sources. In all three cases the CO(1-0) is aligned along the radio axis and found beyond the brightest radio hot-spot, in a region devoid of 4.5$\mu$m emission in Spitzer imaging. The CO(1-0) profiles are broad, with velocity widths of ~ 1000 - 3600 km/s. We discuss several possible scenarios to explain these halo reservoirs of CO(1-0). Following these results, we complement our CO(1-0) study with detections of extended CO from the literature and find at marginal statistical significance (95% level) that CO in HzRGs is preferentially aligned towards the radio jet axis. For the eight sources in which we do not detect CO(1-0), we set realistic upper limits of $L'_{\rm CO} \sim 3-4 \times 10^{10}$ K km/s pc$^{2}$. Our survey reveals a CO(1-0) detection rate of 38%, allowing us to compare the CO(1-0) content of HzRGs with that of other types of high-z galaxies.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2013; 438(4). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a source catalogue and first results from a deep, blind radio survey carried out at 20 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, with follow-up observations at 5.5, 9 and 18 GHz. The Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) deep pilot survey covers a total area of 5 deg^2 in the Chandra Deep Field South and in Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We estimate the survey to be 90% complete above 2.5 mJy. Of the 85 sources detected, 55% have steep spectra (alpha_{1.4}^{20} < -0.5) and 45% have flat or inverted spectra (alpha_{1.4}^{20} >= -0.5). The steep-spectrum sources tend to have single power-law spectra between 1.4 and 18 GHz, while the spectral indices of the flat- or inverted-spectrum sources tend to steepen with frequency. Among the 18 inverted-spectrum (alpha_{1.4}^{20} >= 0.0) sources, 10 have clearly defined peaks in their spectra with alpha_{1.4}^{5.5} > 0.15 and alpha_{9}^{18} < -0.15. On a 3-yr timescale, at least 10 sources varied by more than 15% at 20 GHz, showing that variability is still common at the low flux densities probed by the AT20G-deep pilot survey. We find a strong and puzzling shift in the typical spectral index of the 15-20 GHz source population when combining data from the AT20G, Ninth Cambridge and Tenth Cambridge surveys: there is a shift towards a steeper-spectrum population when going from ~1 Jy to ~5 mJy, which is followed by a shift back towards a flatter-spectrum population below ~5 mJy. The 5-GHz source-count model by Jackson & Wall (1999), which only includes contributions from FRI and FRII sources, and star-forming galaxies, does not reproduce the observed flattening of the flat-spectrum counts below ~5 mJy. It is therefore possible that another population of sources is contributing to this effect.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2013; 439(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spurred by the recent state change in the "missing link" pulsar binary system PSR J1023+0038 (ATel #5513, #5514, #5515, #5516; Stappers et al. 2013, arXiv:1311.7506; Patruno et al. 2013, arXiv:1310.7549) we report on optical, radio, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859, conducted between 2012 March 29 and 2013 December 10.
    The Astronomer's Telegram. 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We have made the first detailed study of the high-frequency radio-source population in the local universe, using a sample of 202 radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey identified with galaxies from the 6dF Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). The AT20G-6dFGS galaxies have a median redshift of z=0.058 and span a wide range in radio luminosity, allowing us to make the first measurement of the local radio luminosity function at 20 GHz. Our sample includes some classical FR-1 and FR-2 radio galaxies, but most of the AT20G-6dFGS galaxies host compact (FR-0) radio AGN which appear lack extended radio emission even at lower frequencies. Most of these FR-0 sources show no evidence for relativistic beaming, and the FR-0 class appears to be a mixed population which includes young Compact Steep-Spectrum (CSS) and Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies. We see a strong dichotomy in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies of FR-1 and FR-2 radio sources, with the FR-1 systems found almost exclusively in WISE `early-type' galaxies and the FR-2 radio sources in WISE `late-type' galaxies. The host galaxies of the flat- and steep-spectrum radio sources have a similar distribution in both K--band luminosity and WISE colours, though galaxies with flat-spectrum sources are more likely to show weak emission lines in their optical spectra. We conclude that these flat-spectrum and steep-spectrum radio sources mainly represent different stages in radio-galaxy evolution, rather than beamed and unbeamed radio-source populations.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 03/2013; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We study a sample of 202 radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey which are identified with nearby galaxies from the 6dF Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). Our sample includes many of the youngest and most active radio galaxies in the local universe, and around 65% of the sample are candidate Compact Steep-Spectrum (CSS) and Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources. The AT20G-6dFGS galaxies have a median redshift of z=0.058 and span a wide range in radio luminosity. The local radio luminosity function (RLF) of galaxies at 20 GHz roughly matches the local 1.4 GHz RLF for radio-loud active galaxies if we make a simple shift in radio spectral index. While most of the AT20G-6dFGS galaxies are massive ellipticals, at least 30% of the radio sources in our sample are hosted by galaxies with WISE infrared colours characteristic of spiral galaxies with ongoing star formation. We see a strong dichotomy in the WISE colours of the host galaxies of FR-1 and FR-2 radio sources in our sample, with the FR-1 systems found almost exclusively in `WISE early-type' galaxies with [4.6]-[12] < 2.0 mag and the FR-2 radio galaxies in `WISE late-type' galaxies with [4.6]-[12] > 2.0 mag. This strongly suggests that some factor related to the host-galaxy morphology or large-scale environment helps to determine whether a young radio source evolves into an extended FR-1 radio galaxy or an FR-2 system. The host galaxies of flat- and steep-spectrum sources in our sample have a similar distribution in both galaxy stellar mass and WISE colours (though galaxies with flat-spectrum radio sources are more likely to show weak emission lines in their optical spectra). This is consistent with a picture in which these flat-spectrum and steep-spectrum radio sources represent different stages in radio-galaxy evolution, rather than beamed and unbeamed radio-source populations.
    03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We report results of the first phase of observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 5 and 9 GHz of the fields around 411 gamma-ray sources with declinations < +10 deg detected by Fermi but marked as unassociated in the 2FGL catalogue. We have detected 424 sources with flux densities in a range of 2 mJy to 6 Jy that lie within the 99 per cent localisation uncertainty of 283 gamma-ray sources. Of these, 146 objects were detected in both the 5 and 9 GHz bands. We found 84 sources in our sample with a spectral index flatter than -0.5. The majority of detected sources are weaker than 100 mJy and for this reason were not found in previous surveys. Approximately 1/3 of our sample, 128 objects, have the probability of being associated by more than 10 times than the probability of being a background source found in the vicinity of a gamma-ray object by chance. We present the catalogue of positions of these sources, estimates of their flux densities and spectral indices where available.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 01/2013; 432(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The distribution of QSO radio luminosities has long been debated in the literature. Some argue that it is a bimodal distribution, implying that there are two separate QSO populations (normally referred to as 'radio-loud' and 'radio-quiet'), while others claim it forms a more continuous distribution characteristic of a single population. We use deep observations at 20 GHz to investigate whether the distribution is bimodal at high radio frequencies. Carrying out this study at high radio frequencies has an advantage over previous studies as the radio emission comes predominantly from the core of the AGN, hence probes the most recent activity. Studies carried out at lower frequencies are dominated by the large scale lobes where the emission is built up over longer timescales (10^7-10^8 yrs), thereby confusing the sample. Our sample comprises 874 X-ray selected QSOs that were observed as part of the 6dF Galaxy Survey. Of these, 40% were detected down to a 3 sigma detection limit of 0.2-0.5 mJy. No evidence of bimodality is seen in either the 20 GHz luminosity distribution or in the distribution of the R_20 parameter: the ratio of the radio to optical luminosities traditionally used to classify objects as being either radio-loud or radio-quiet. Previous results have claimed that at low radio luminosities, star formation processes can dominate the radio emission observed in QSOs. We attempt to investigate these claims by stacking the undetected sources at 20 GHz and discuss the limitations in carrying out this analysis. However, if the radio emission was solely due to star formation processes, we calculate that this corresponds to star formation rates ranging from ~10 solar masses/yr to ~2300 solar masses/yr.
    The Astrophysical Journal 05/2012; 754(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present results from a search for 21 cm associated HI absorption in a sample of 29 radio sources selected from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey. Observations were conducted using the Australia Telescope Compact Array Broadband Backend, with which we can simultaneously look for 21 cm absorption in a redshift range of 0.04 < z < 0.08, with a velocity resolution of 7 km/s . In preparation for future large-scale H I absorption surveys we test a spectral-line finding method based on Bayesian inference. We use this to assign significance to our detections and to determine the best-fitting number of spectral-line components. We find that the automated spectral-line search is limited by residuals in the continuum, both from the band-pass calibration and spectral-ripple subtraction, at spectral-line widths of \Deltav_FWHM > 103 km/s . Using this technique we detect two new absorbers and a third, previously known, yielding a 10 per cent detection rate. Of the detections, the spectral-line profiles are consistent with the theory that we are seeing different orientations of the absorbing gas, in both the host galaxy and circumnuclear disc, with respect to our line-of-sight to the source. In order to spatially resolve the spectral-line components in the two new detections, and so verify this conclusion, we require further high-resolution 21 cm observations (~0.01 arcsec) using very long baseline interferometry.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 04/2012; 423(3). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use high angular resolution data, measured from visibility of sources at the longest baseline of 4500 m of the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), for the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey to obtain angular size information for > 94% of AT20G sources. We confirm the previous AT20G result that due to the high survey frequency of 20 GHz, the source population is strongly dominated by compact sources (79%). At 0.15 arcseconds angular resolution limit, we show a very strong correlation between the compact and extended sources with flat and steep-spectrum sources respectively. Thus, we provide a firm physical basis for the traditional spectral classification into flat and steep-spectrum sources to separate compact and extended sources. We find the cut-off of -0.46 to be optimum for spectral indices between 1 and 5 GHz and, hence, recommend the continued use of -0.5 for future studies. We study the effect of spectral curvature on redshift cut-off of compact AGNs using recently published redshift data. Using spectral indices at different frequencies, we correct for the redshift effect and produce restframe frequency spectra for compact sources for redshift up to ~5. We show that the flat spectra of most compact sources start to steepen at ~30 GHz. At higher frequencies, the spectra of both populations are steep so the use of spectral index does not separate the compact and extended source populations as well as in lower frequencies. We find that due to the spectral steepening, surveys of compact sources at higher frequencies (>5 GHz) will have redshift cut-off due to spectral curvature but at lower frequencies, the surveys are not significantly affected by spectral curvature, thus, the evidence for a strong redshift cut-off in AGNs found in lower frequency surveys is a real cut-off and not a result of K-correction.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 02/2012; 422(3). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Here, we describe the Compact Array Broad-band Backend (CABB) and present first results obtained with the upgraded Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The 16-fold increase in observing bandwidth, from 2 × 128 to 2 × 2048 MHz, high-bit sampling and the addition of 16 zoom windows (each divided into further 2048 channels) provide major improvements for all ATCA observations. The benefits of the new system are: (1) hugely increased radio continuum and polarization sensitivity as well as image fidelity; (2) substantially improved capability to search for and map emission and absorption lines over large velocity ranges; (3) simultaneous multi-line and continuum observations; (4) increased sensitivity, survey speed and dynamic range due to high-bit sampling and (5) high-velocity resolution, while maintaining full polarization output. The new CABB system encourages all observers to make use of both spectral line and continuum data to achieve their full potential.Given the dramatic increase of the ATCA capabilities in all bands (ranging from 1.1 to 105 GHz) CABB enables scientific projects that were not feasible before the upgrade, such as simultaneous observations of multiple spectral lines, on-the-fly mapping, fast follow-up of radio transients (e.g. the radio afterglow of new supernovae) and maser observation at high-velocity resolution and full polarization. The first science results presented here include wide-band spectra, high dynamic-range images and polarization measurements, highlighting the increased capability and discovery potential of the ATCA.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 09/2011; 416(2):832 - 856. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our current understanding of radio-loud AGN comes predominantly from studies at frequencies of 5 GHz and below. With the recent completion of the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey, we can now gain insight into the high-frequency radio properties of AGN. This paper presents supplementary information on the AT20G sources in the form of optical counterparts and redshifts. Optical counterparts were identified using the SuperCOSMOS database and redshifts were found from either the 6dF Galaxy survey or the literature. We also report 144 new redshifts. For AT20G sources outside the Galactic plane, 78.5% have optical identifications and 30.9% have redshift information. The optical identification rate also increases with increasing flux density. Targets which had optical spectra available were examined to obtain a spectral classification. There appear to be two distinct AT20G populations; the high luminosity quasars that are generally associated with point-source optical counterparts and exhibit strong emission lines in the optical spectrum, and the lower luminosity radio galaxies that are generally associated with passive galaxies in both the optical images and spectroscopic properties. It is suggested that these different populations can be associated with different accretion modes (cold-mode or hot-mode). We find that the cold-mode sources have a steeper spectral index and produce more luminous radio lobes, but generally reside in smaller host galaxies than their hot-mode counterparts. This can be attributed to the fact that they are accreting material more efficiently. Lastly, we compare the AT20G survey with the S-cubed semi-empirical (S3-SEX) models and conclude that the S3-SEX models need refining to correctly model the compact cores of AGN. The AT20G survey provides the ideal sample to do this.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 07/2011; 417. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Here we describe the Compact Array Broadband Backend (CABB) and present first results obtained with the upgraded Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The 16-fold increase in observing bandwidth, from 2 x 128 MHz to 2 x 2048 MHz, high bit sampling, and addition of 16 zoom windows (each divided into a further 2048 channels) provide major improvements for all ATCA observations. The benefits of the new system are: (1) hugely increased radio continuum and polarization sensitivity as well as image fidelity, (2) substantially improved capability to search for and map emission and absorption lines over large velocity ranges, (3) simultaneous multi-line and continuum observations, (4) increased sensitivity, survey speed and dynamic range due to high-bit sampling, and (5) high velocity resolution, while maintaining full polarization output. The new CABB system encourages all observers to make use of both spectral line and continuum data to achieve their full potential. Given the dramatic increase of the ATCA capabilities in all bands (ranging from 1.1 to 105 GHz) CABB enables scientific projects that were not feasible before the upgrade, such as simultaneous observations of multiple spectral lines, on-the-fly mapping, fast follow-up of radio transients (e.g., the radio afterglow of new supernovae) and maser observations at high velocity resolution and full polarization. The first science results presented here include wide-band spectra, high dynamic-range images, and polarization measurements, highlighting the increased capability and discovery potential of the ATCA.
    05/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: The Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey is a blind survey of the whole Southern sky at 20 GHz with follow-up observations at 4.8, 8.6 and 20 GHz carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) from 2004 to 2008. In this paper we present an analysis of radio spectral properties in total intensity and polarization, sizes, optical identifications and redshifts of the sample of the 5808 extragalactic sources in the survey catalogue of confirmed sources over 6.1 sr in the Southern sky (i.e. the whole Southern sky excluding the strip at Galactic latitude |b| < ).The sample has a flux density limit of 40 mJy. Completeness has been measured as a function of scan region and flux density. Averaging over the whole survey area the follow-up survey is 78 per cent complete above 50 mJy and 93 per cent complete above 100 mJy. 3332 sources with declination δ < −15° have good quality almost simultaneous observations at 4.8, 8.6 and 20 GHz. The spectral analysis shows that the sample is dominated by flat-spectrum sources, with 69 per cent having spectral index α208.6 > − 0.5 (S∝να). The fraction of flat-spectrum sources decreases from 81 per cent for S20 GHz > 500 mJy to 60 per cent for S20 GHz < 100 mJy. There is also a clear spectral steepening at higher frequencies with the median α decreasing from −0.16 between 4.8 and 8.6 GHz to −0.28 between 8.6 and 20 GHz.Simultaneous observations in polarization are available for all the sources at all the frequencies. 768 sources have a good-quality detection of polarized flux density at 20 GHz; 467 of them were also detected in polarization at 4.8 and/or at 8.6 GHz so that it has been possible to compare the spectral behaviour in total intensity and polarization. We have found that the polarized fraction increases slightly with frequency and decreases with flux density. The spectral indices in total intensity and in polarization are, on average, close to each other, but we also found several sources for which the spectral shape of the polarized emission is substantially different from the spectral shape in total intensity. The correlation between the spectral indices in total intensity and in polarization is weaker for flat-spectrum sources.Cross-matches and comparisons have been made with other catalogues at lower radio frequencies, and in the optical, X-ray and γ-ray bands. Redshift estimates are available for 825 sources.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 03/2011; 412(1):318 - 330. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 01/2011; 416:832-856.
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    ABSTRACT: The Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey is a blind survey of the whole Southern sky at 20 GHz with follow-up observations at 4.8, 8.6, and 20 GHz carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). In this paper we present an analysis of radio spectral properties in total intensity and polarisation, sizes, optical identifications, and redshifts of the sample of the 5808 extragalactic sources in the survey catalogue of confirmed sources over the whole Southern sky excluding the strip at Galactic latitude |b|<1.5deg. The sample has a flux density limit of 40 mJy. Completeness has been measured as a function of scan region and flux density. Averaging over the whole survey area the follow-up survey is 78% complete above 50mJy and 93% complete above 100mJy. 3332 sources with declination <-15deg have good quality almost simultaneous observations at 4.8, 8.6, and 20GHz. The spectral analysis shows that the sample is dominated by flat-spectrum sources. The fraction of flat-spectrum sources decreases from 81% for 20GHz flux densities S>500mJy, to 60% for S<100mJy. There is also a clear spectral steepening at higher frequencies with the median spectral index decreasing from -0.16 between 4.8 and 8.6GHz to -0.28 between 8.6 and 20GHz. Simultaneous observations in polarisation are available for all the sources at all the frequencies. 768 sources have a good quality detection of polarised flux density at 20GHz; 467 of them were also detected in polarisation at 4.8 and/or at 8.6GHz so that it has been possible to compare the spectral behaviour in total intensity and polarisation. We have found that the polarised fraction increases slightly with frequency and decreases with flux density. Cross matches and comparisons have been made with other catalogues at lower radio frequencies, and in the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray bands. Redshift estimates are available for 825 sources. Comment: 15 pages, 16 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
    10/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: The recently commissioned Compact Array Broadband Backend (CABB) on the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provides 2 GHz bandwidth in each frequency and polarisation, significantly increasing the sensitivity of the Array. This increased sensitivity allows for larger samples of sources to be targeted whilst also probing fainter radio luminosities. Using CABB, we have observed a large sample of objects at 20 GHz to investigate the high-frequency radio luminosity distribution of X-ray selected QSOs at redshifts less than 1. Observing at high frequencies allows us to focus on the core emission of the AGN, hence recording the most recent activity. Comment: Accepted for publication in Proceedings of Science [PoS(ISKAF2010)072]. Poster presented at 'A New Golden Age for Radio Astronomy', International SKA Forum 2010, 10-14 June 2010, Hof van Saksen, NL
    08/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to obtain 40 GHz and 95 GHz observations of a number of sources that were selected from the Australia Telescope Compact Array 20 GHz (AT20G) survey . The aim of the observations was to improve the spectral coverage for sources with spectral peaks near 20 GHz or inverted (rising) radio spectra between 8.6 GHz and 20 GHz. We present the radio observations of a sample of 21 such sources along with optical spectra taken from the ANU Siding Spring Observatory 2.3m telescope and the ESO-New Technology Telescope (NTT). We find that as a group the sources show the same level of variability as typical GPS sources, and that of the 21 candidate GPS sources roughly 60% appear to be genuinely young radio galaxies. Three of the 21 sources studied show evidence of being restarted radio galaxies. If these numbers are indicative of the larger population of AT20G radio sources then as many as 400 genuine GPS sources could be contained within the AT20G with up to 25% of them being restarted radio galaxies. Comment: 21 pages, 24 figures, Table 1 truncated at 11 columns
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 08/2010; · 5.52 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

198 Citations
85.24 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2014
    • Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy
      Dwingelo, Drenthe, Netherlands
  • 2007–2012
    • University of Sydney
      • • Sydney Institute of Astronomy (SIfA)
      • • School of Physics
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2011
    • University of Tasmania
      Hobart Town, Tasmania, Australia
    • Swinburne University of Technology
      • Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia