Denise H J Delahaije

Maastricht Universitair Medisch Centrum, Maestricht, Limburg, Netherlands

Are you Denise H J Delahaije?

Claim your profile

Publications (4)7.61 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: To validate a previously published prediction model for recurrent early-onset preeclampsia (PE). Methods: We included 229 pregnant women with a history of early-onset PE and computed their risk using the prediction model, compared the predicted risk to their pregnancy outcomes and assessed performance of the model. Results: Early-onset PE recurred in 6.6% of participants. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 59% (95% CI: 45-73). The model created groups that were only moderately different in terms of their risk. Conclusions: The model's discriminate ability was poor and predictive performance insufficient to classify women into relevant risk groups.
    Hypertension in Pregnancy 01/2014; · 0.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Women who suffered from pregnancy complications are at increased risk for anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether having suffered from preeclampsia (PE) or HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) syndrome is associated with anxiety and depression, and whether PE/HELLP is an independent risk factor for developing anxiety and depression. Systematic search on PubMed and PsycInfo with no time limit. Studies presenting original data, including women with a history of PE/HELLP and at least one comparison group of women without PE/HELLP, reporting the results for each group separately or in a multivariate regression analysis with PE/HELLP as an independent variable. Study characteristics and outcomes were extracted using a prespecified form. If necessary, additional calculations were performed. The search yielded 267 articles, with only six being suitable for inclusion in this review. Studies on depression (six studies) showed generally positive associations between PE/HELLP and the prevalence of depression or severity of depressive symptoms. However, the results of three studies were not statistically significant. Studies addressing anxiety (two studies) did not show significant associations between PE/HELLP and anxiety scores. Associations between post‐traumatic stress and PE/HELLP, investigated in four studies, were often nonsignificant. Due to heterogeneity of study methods, a meta‐analysis of the results was not possible. In most studies, confounder control was poor. Evidence is mixed but generally points to positive associations between various forms of psychopathology and previous PE/HELLP. Causality of the associations can, however, not be judged adequately.
    Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica 01/2013; 92(7). · 1.85 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To develop a model to identify women at very low risk of recurrent early-onset preeclampsia. We enrolled 407 women who had experienced early-onset preeclampsia in their first pregnancy, resulting in a delivery before 34 weeks' gestation. Preeclampsia was defined as hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg) after 20 weeks' gestation with de novo proteinuria (≥300 mg urinary protein excretion/day). Based on the previous published evidence and expert opinion, 5 predictors (gestational age at previous birth, prior small-for-gestational-age newborn, fasting blood glucose, body mass index, and hypertension) were entered in a logistic regression model. Discrimination and calibration were evaluated after adjusting for overfitting by bootstrapping techniques. Early-onset disease recurred in 28 (6.9%) of 407 women. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the model was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.56-0.74). Calibration was good, indicated by a nonsignificant Hosmer-Lemeshow test (P = .11). Using a predicted absolute risk threshold of, for example, 4.6% (ie, women identified with an estimated risk either above or below 4.6%), the sensitivity was 100%, with a specificity of 26%. In such a strategy, no women who developed preeclampsia were missed, while 98 of the 407 women would be regarded as low risk of recurrent early-onset preeclampsia, not necessarily requiring intensified antenatal care. Our model may be helpful in the identification of women at very low risk of recurrent early-onset preeclampsia. Before widespread application, our model should be validated in other populations.
    Reproductive sciences (Thousand Oaks, Calif.) 06/2011; 18(11):1154-9. · 2.31 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome may have serious consequences for both mother and fetus. Women who have suffered from preeclampsia or the HELLP syndrome, have an increased risk of developing preeclampsia in a subsequent pregnancy. However, most women will develop no or only minor complications. In this study, we intend to determine cost-effectiveness of recurrence risk guided care versus care as usual in pregnant women with a history of early-onset preeclampsia. We developed a prediction model to estimate the individual risk of recurrence of early-onset preeclampsia and the HELLP syndrome. In a before-after study, pregnant women with preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome in their previous pregnancy receiving care as usual (before introduction of the prediction model) will be compared with women receiving recurrence risk guided care (after introduction of the prediction model). Eligible and pregnant women will be recruited at six university hospitals and seven large non-university tertiary referral hospitals in the Netherlands. The primary outcome measure is the recurrence of early-onset preeclampsia or HELLP syndrome in women allocated to the regular monitoring group. For the economic evaluation, a modelling approach will be used. Costs and effects of recurrence risk guided care with those of care as usual will be compared by means of a decision model. Two incremental cost-effectiveness ratios will be calculated: 1) cost per Quality Adjusted Life Year (mother unit of analysis) and 2) cost per live born child (child unit of analysis). This is, to our knowledge, the first study that evaluates prospectively the efficacy of a multivariable prediction rule for recurrent hypertensive disease in pregnancy. Results of this study could either be integrated into the current guideline on Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy, or be used to develop a new guideline.
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 10/2010; 10:60. · 2.52 Impact Factor