David C Wheeler

University College London, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (105)898.5 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Patients with end-stage renal disease often have derangements in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and resultant secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT), which may contribute to the high prevalence of arterial stiffness and hypertension. We conducted a secondary analysis of the Evaluation of Cinacalcet Hydrochloride Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events (EVOLVE) trial, in which patients receiving hemodialysis with sHPT were randomly assigned to receive cinacalcet or placebo. We sought to examine whether the effect of cinacalcet on death and major cardiovascular events was modified by baseline pulse pressure as a marker of arterial stiffness, and whether cinacalcet yielded any effects on blood pressure. As reported previously, an unadjusted intention-to-treat analysis failed to conclude that randomization to cinacalcet reduces the risk of the primary composite end point (all-cause mortality or non-fatal myocardial infarction, heart failure, hospitalization for unstable angina or peripheral vascular event). However, after prespecified adjustment for baseline characteristics, patients randomized to cinacalcet experienced a nominally significant 13% lower adjusted risk (95% confidence limit 4-20%) of the primary composite end point. The effect of cinacalcet was not modified by baseline pulse pressure (Pinteraction=0.44). In adjusted models, at 20 weeks cinacalcet resulted in a 2.2 mm Hg larger average decrease in systolic blood pressure (P=0.002) and a 1.3 mm Hg larger average decrease in diastolic blood pressure (P=0.002) compared with placebo. In summary, in the EVOLVE trial, the effect of cinacalcet on death and major cardiovascular events was independent of baseline pulse pressure.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 4 June 2015; doi:10.1038/jhh.2015.56.
    Journal of human hypertension 06/2015; DOI:10.1038/jhh.2015.56 · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI). Whether estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) remain risk factors for AKI in the presence and absence of these conditions is uncertain. Meta-analysis of cohort studies. 8 general-population (1,285,045 participants) and 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD; 79,519 participants) cohorts. Cohorts participating in the CKD Prognosis Consortium. Diabetes and hypertension status, eGFR by the 2009 CKD Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine equation, urine ACR, and interactions. Hospitalization with AKI, using Cox proportional hazards models to estimate HRs of AKI and random-effects meta-analysis to pool results. During a mean follow-up of 4 years, there were 16,480 episodes of AKI in the general-population and 2,087 episodes in the CKD cohorts. Low eGFRs and high ACRs were associated with higher risks of AKI in individuals with or without diabetes and with or without hypertension. When compared to a common reference of eGFR of 80mL/min/1.73m(2) in nondiabetic patients, HRs for AKI were generally higher in diabetic patients at any level of eGFR. The same was true for diabetic patients at all levels of ACR compared with nondiabetic patients. The risk gradient for AKI with lower eGFRs was greater in those without diabetes than with diabetes, but similar with higher ACRs in those without versus with diabetes. Those with hypertension had a higher risk of AKI at eGFRs>60mL/min/1.73m(2) than those without hypertension. However, risk gradients for AKI with both lower eGFRs and higher ACRs were greater for those without than with hypertension. AKI identified by diagnostic code. Lower eGFRs and higher ACRs are associated with higher risks of AKI among individuals with or without either diabetes or hypertension. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 05/2015; DOI:10.1053/j.ajkd.2015.02.338 · 5.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Early mortality is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, but little is known about early cardiovascular event (CVE) rates after HD initiation. To study this we analyzed data in the AROii cohort of incident HD patients from over 300 European Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers. Weekly rates of a composite of CVEs during the first year and monthly rates of the composite and its constituents (coronary artery, cerebrovascular, peripheral arterial, congestive heart failure, and sudden cardiac death) during the first 2 years after HD initiation were assessed. Of 6308 patients that started dialysis within 7 days, 1449 patients experienced 2405 CVEs over the next 2 years. The first-year CVE rate (30.2/100 person-years; 95% CI, 28.7-31.7) greatly exceeded the second-year rate (19.4/100; 95% CI, 18.1-20.8). Composite CVEs were highest during the first week with increased risk compared with the second year, persisting until the fifth month. Except for sudden cardiac death, temporal patterns of rates for all CVE categories were very similar, with highest rates during the first month and a high-risk period extending to 4 months. Higher or lower cumulative weekly dialysis dose, lower blood flow, and lower net ultrafiltration during dialysis were associated with CVE during the high-risk period, but not during the post high-risk period. Thus, the incidence of CVE in the first weeks after HD initiation is much higher than during subsequent periods which raises concerns that HD initiation may trigger CVEs.Kidney International advance online publication, 29 April 2015; doi:10.1038/ki.2015.117.
    Kidney International 04/2015; DOI:10.1038/ki.2015.117 · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nitric oxide (NO) production is diminished in many patients with cardiovascular and renal disease. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthesis, and elevated plasma levels of ADMA are associated with poor outcomes. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1 (DDAH1) is a methylarginine-metabolizing enzyme that reduces ADMA levels. We reported previously that a DDAH1 gene variant associated with increased renal DDAH1 mRNA transcription and lower plasma ADMA levels, but counterintuitively, a steeper rate of renal function decline. Here, we test the hypothesis that reduced renal-specific ADMA metabolism protects against progressive renal damage. Renal DDAH1 is expressed predominately within the proximal tubule. A novel proximal tubule-specific Ddah1 knockout (Ddah1(PT-/-)) mouse demonstrated tubular cell accumulation of ADMA and lower NO concentrations, but unaltered plasma ADMA concentrations. Ddah1(PT-/-) mice were protected from reduced kidney tissue mass, collagen deposition, and profibrotic cytokine expression in two independent renal injury models: folate nephropathy and unilateral ureteric obstruction. Furthermore, a study of two independent kidney transplant cohorts revealed higher levels of human renal allograft methylarginine-metabolizing enzyme gene expression associated with steeper function decline. We also report an association among DDAH1 expression, NO activity, and uromodulin expression supported by data from both animal and human studies, raising the possibility that kidney DDAH1 expression exacerbates renal injury through uromodulin-related mechanisms. Together, these data demonstrate that reduced renal tubular ADMA metabolism protects against progressive kidney function decline. Thus, circulating ADMA may be an imprecise marker of renal methylarginine metabolism, and therapeutic ADMA reduction may even be deleterious to kidney function. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 04/2015; DOI:10.1681/ASN.2014030280 · 9.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) affects up to 12 million individuals and is the fourth most common cause for renal replacement therapy worldwide. There have been many recent advances in the understanding of its molecular genetics and biology, and in the diagnosis and management of its manifestations. Yet, diagnosis, evaluation, prevention, and treatment vary widely and there are no broadly accepted practice guidelines. Barriers to translation of basic science breakthroughs to clinical care exist, with considerable heterogeneity across countries. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Controversies Conference on ADPKD brought together a panel of multidisciplinary clinical expertise and engaged patients to identify areas of consensus, gaps in knowledge, and research and health-care priorities related to diagnosis; monitoring of kidney disease progression; management of hypertension, renal function decline and complications; end-stage renal disease; extrarenal complications; and practical integrated patient support. These are summarized in this review.Kidney International advance online publication, 18 March 2015; doi:10.1038/ki.2015.59.
    Kidney International 03/2015; DOI:10.1038/ki.2015.59 · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The calcimimetic cinacalcet reduced the risk of death or cardiovascular (CV) events in older, but not younger, patients with moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) who were receiving hemodialysis. To determine whether the lower risk in younger patients might be due to lower baseline CV risk and more frequent use of cointerventions that reduce parathyroid hormone (kidney transplantation, parathyroidectomy, and commercial cinacalcet use), this study examined the effects of cinacalcet in older (≥65 years, n=1005) and younger (<65 years, n=2878) patients. Evaluation of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events (EVOLVE) was a global, multicenter, randomized placebo-controlled trial in 3883 prevalent patients on hemodialysis, whose outcomes included death, major CV events, and development of severe unremitting HPT. The age subgroup analysis was prespecified. Older patients had higher baseline prevalence of diabetes mellitus and CV comorbidity. Annualized rates of kidney transplantation and parathyroidectomy were >3-fold higher in younger relative to older patients and were more frequent in patients randomized to placebo. In older patients, the adjusted relative hazard (95% confidence interval) for the primary composite (CV) end point (cinacalcet versus placebo) was 0.70 (0.60 to 0.81); in younger patients, the relative hazard was 0.97 (0.86 to 1.09). Corresponding adjusted relative hazards for mortality were 0.68 (0.51 to 0.81) and 0.99 (0.86 to 1.13). Reduction in the risk of severe unremitting HPT was similar in both groups. In the EVOLVE trial, cinacalcet decreased the risk of death and of major CV events in older, but not younger, patients with moderate to severe HPT who were receiving hemodialysis. Effect modification by age may be partly explained by differences in underlying CV risk and differential application of cointerventions that reduce parathyroid hormone. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.
    Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 02/2015; 10(5). DOI:10.2215/CJN.07730814 · 5.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new definition and classification of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) was proposed in 2005 and it was later followed by a guideline publication on this topic from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) in 2009. This work recognized that CKD-MBD is a syndrome of bone abnormalities, laboratory abnormalities, and vascular calcification linked to fractures, cardiovascular disease, and mortality. Because of limited data at the time of the original guideline systematic review, many of the recommendations were cautiously vague. KDIGO convened a Controversies Conference in October 2013 to review the CKD-MBD literature published since the 2009 guideline. Specifically, the objective of this conference was to determine whether sufficient new data had emerged to support a reassessment of the CKD-MBD guideline and if so to determine the scope of these potential revisions. This report summarizes the results of these proceedings, highlighting important new studies conducted in the interval since the original KDIGO CKD-MBD guideline.Kidney International advance online publication, 4 February 2015; doi:10.1038/ki.2014.425.
    Kidney International 02/2015; 87(3). DOI:10.1038/ki.2014.425 · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fractures are frequent in patients receiving hemodialysis. We tested the hypothesis that cinacalcet would reduce the rate of clinical fractures in patients receiving hemodialysis using data from the Evaluation of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events trial, a placebo-controlled trial that randomized 3883 hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism to receive cinacalcet or placebo for ≤64 months. This study was a prespecified secondary analysis of the trial whose primary end point was all-cause mortality and non-fatal cardiovascular events, and one of the secondary end points was first clinical fracture event. Clinical fractures were observed in 255 of 1935 (13.2%) patients randomized to placebo and 238 of 1948 (12.2%) patients randomized to cinacalcet. In an unadjusted intention-to-treat analysis, the relative hazard for fracture (cinacalcet versus placebo) was 0.89 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.75 to 1.07). After adjustment for baseline characteristics and multiple fractures, the relative hazard was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.72 to 0.98). Using a prespecified lag-censoring analysis (a measure of actual drug exposure), the relative hazard for fracture was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.58 to 0.90). When participants were censored at the time of cointerventions (parathyroidectomy, transplant, or provision of commercial cinacalcet), the relative hazard was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.58 to 0.87). Fracture rates were higher in older compared with younger patients and the effect of cinacalcet appeared more pronounced in older patients. In conclusion, using an unadjusted intention-to-treat analysis, cinacalcet did not reduce the rate of clinical fracture. However, when accounting for differences in baseline characteristics, multiple fractures, and/or events prompting discontinuation of study drug, cinacalcet reduced the rate of clinical fracture by 16%-29%. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 12/2014; 26(6). DOI:10.1681/ASN.2014040414 · 9.47 Impact Factor
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    Nitric Oxide 11/2014; 42C:130-131. DOI:10.1016/j.niox.2014.09.095 · 3.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Premature cardiovascular disease limits the duration and quality of life on long-term hemodialysis. The objective of this study was to define the frequency of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events attributable to atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic mechanisms, risk factors for these events, and the effects of cinacalcet, using adjudicated data collected during the EValuation of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower CardioVascular Events (EVOLVE) Trial. EVOLVE was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial that randomized 3883 hemodialysis patients with moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism to cinacalcet or matched placebo for up to 64 months. For this post hoc analysis, the outcome measure was fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events reflecting atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. During the trial, 1518 patients experienced an adjudicated cardiovascular event, including 958 attributable to nonatherosclerotic disease. Of 1421 deaths during the trial, 768 (54%) were due to cardiovascular disease. Sudden death was the most frequent fatal cardiovascular event, accounting for 24.5% of overall mortality. Combining fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, randomization to cinacalcet reduced the rates of sudden death and heart failure. Patients randomized to cinacalcet experienced fewer nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular events (adjusted relative hazard 0.84, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.96), while the effect of cinacalcet on atherosclerotic events did not reach statistical significance. Accepting the limitations of post hoc analysis, any benefits of cinacalcet on cardiovascular disease in the context of hemodialysis may result from attenuation of nonatherosclerotic processes. Unique identifier: NCT00345839. URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.
    Journal of the American Heart Association 10/2014; 3(6). DOI:10.1161/JAHA.114.001363 · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are unlikely to gain the same benefit from conventional doses of statins as do patients with cardiovascular disease alone. This study investigated whether inflammation accompanying CKD causes statin resistance. Methods. Inflammatory stress was induced by adding cytokines and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to human mesangial cells (HMCs) in vitro, and in vivo by subcutaneous casein injection in apolipoprotein E, scavenger receptors class A and CD36 triple knockout mice. Results. Inflammatory stress exacerbated cholesterol accumulation and was accompanied in vitro and in vivo by increased HMGCoA reductase (HMGCoA-R) mRNA and protein expression mediated via activation of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 pathway. Atorvastatin reduced HMGCoA-R enzymatic activity and intracellular cholesterol synthesis in vitro; however, inflammatory stress weakened these suppressive effects. Atorvastatin at concentrations of 15 mu M inhibited HMGCoA-R activity by 50% (IC50) in HMCs, but the same concentration in the presence of interleukin (IL)-1 beta resulted in only 30% inhibition of HMGCoA-R activity in HMCs. Knocking down SCAP prevented statin resistance induced by IL-1 beta, and overexpression of SCAP-induced statin resistance even without inflammatory stress. In vivo, the amount of atorvastatin required to lower serum cholesterol and decrease kidney lipid accumulation rose from 2 to 10 mg/kg/day in the presence of inflammatory stress. Conclusions. Inflammatory stress can disrupt HMGCoA-R-mediated cholesterol synthesis resulting in intracellular lipid accumulation and statin resistance.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 06/2014; 29(10). DOI:10.1093/ndt/gfu203 · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol/L compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant 3% reduction in the incidence of ESRD (1057 [33.9%] cases with simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus 1084 [34.6%] cases with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.89 to 1.05; P=0.41). Similarly, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had no significant effect on the prespecified tertiary outcomes of ESRD or death (1477 [47.4%] events with treatment versus 1513 [48.3%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.04; P=0.34) or ESRD or doubling of baseline creatinine (1189 [38.2%] events with treatment versus 1257 [40.2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 05/2014; 25(8). DOI:10.1681/ASN.2013090965 · 9.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) continue to grow markedly throughout the world, due primarily to the increase in type 2 DM (T2DM). Although improvements in DM and hypertension management have reduced the proportion of diabetic individuals who develop chronic kidney disease (CKD) and progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the sheer increase in people developing DM will have a major impact on dialysis and transplant needs. This KDIGO conference addressed a number of controversial areas in the management of DM patients with CKD, including aspects of screening for CKD with measurements of albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); defining treatment outcomes; glycemic management in both those developing CKD and those with ESRD; hypertension goals and management, including blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; and lipid management.Kidney International advance online publication, 30 April 2014; doi:10.1038/ki.2014.128.
    Kidney International 04/2014; DOI:10.1038/ki.2014.128 · 8.52 Impact Factor
  • David C Wheeler, Gavin Becker
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 04/2014; 63(6). DOI:10.1053/j.ajkd.2014.03.007 · 5.76 Impact Factor
  • Bertram L Kasiske, David C Wheeler
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    ABSTRACT: Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) was founded in 2003 to fulfill a need for international cooperation and consolidation in the development and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. KDIGO has experienced a rapid growth in the development of guidelines, producing three guidelines in its first 6 years and another six in the last 3 years. In addition, it has held 12 global conferences on important issues in kidney disease and its treatment. A major effort is under way to support the dissemination and implementation of KDIGO guidelines through various channels, including an Implementation Task Force with official representatives in 86 countries. KDIGO is now under its own management and remains committed to the development of evidence-based guidelines. Future challenges include finding adequate sources of funding and building stronger links with other organizations involved in guideline development and implementation.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 11/2013; 29(4). DOI:10.1093/ndt/gft441 · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The risk of cardiovascular disease is increased by up to 33 to 50× in chronic inflammatory states and convention doses of statins may not provide the same cardiovascular protection as in noninflamed patients. This study investigated whether the increase in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoA-R)-mediated cholesterol synthesis observed under inflammatory stress was resistant to the action of statins and if so, whether this was because of interference with the sterol regulatory element binding protein cleavage-activating protein pathway. Inflammatory stress was induced by adding cytokines (interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6) and lipopolysaccharides to vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro and by subcutaneous casein injection in apolipoprotein E/scavenger receptors class A/CD36 triple knockout mice in vivo. Inflammatory stress exacerbated cholesterol ester accumulation and was accompanied in vitro and in vivo by increased HMGCoA-R mRNA and protein expression mediated via activation of the sterol regulatory element binding protein cleavage-activating protein/sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 pathway. Atorvastatin reduced HMGCoA-R enzymatic activity and intracellular cholesterol synthesis in vitro. However, inflammatory stress weakened these suppressive effects. Atorvastatin at concentrations of 16 μmol/L inhibited HMGCoA-R activity by 50% in vascular smooth muscle cells, but the same concentration resulted in only 30% of HMGCoA-R activity in vascular smooth muscle cells in the presence of interleukin-1β. Knocking down sterol regulatory element binding protein cleavage-activating protein prevented statin resistance induced by interleukin-1β, and overexpression of sterol regulatory element binding protein cleavage-activating protein induced statin resistance even without inflammatory stress. In vivo, the amount of atorvastatin required to lower serum cholesterol and decrease aortic lipid accumulation rose from 2 to 10 mg/kg per day in the presence of inflammatory stress. Increased cholesterol synthesis mediated by HMGCoA-R under inflammatory stress may be one of the mechanisms for intracellular lipid accumulation and statin resistance.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 11/2013; 34(2). DOI:10.1161/ATVBAHA.113.301301 · 5.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context:The clinical course of secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) in patients on hemodialysis is not well described, and the effect of the calcimimetic cinacalcet on disease progression is uncertain.Objective:To describe (a) the clinical course of sHPT in patients treated with phosphate binders and/or vitamin D sterols and (b) the impact of cinacalcet on occurrence of severe unremitting HPT, defined by the persistence of markedly elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations together with hypercalcemia or parathyroidectomy (PTX).Design:Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.Setting:Global, multicenter.Patients:3883 patients on hemodialysis of 5755 screened with moderate to severe sHPT.Main outcome measures:Parathyroidectomy, severe, unremitting HPT and use of commercial cinacalcet (a protocol violation).Intervention:Cinacalcet (30 to 180 mg daily) or placebo for up to 64 months.Results:In the 1935 patients randomized to placebo, 278 (14%) patients underwent PTX (median PTH 1872 pg/mL within prior 12 weeks of surgery). Age, sex, geographic region, co-morbidity, calcium-containing phosphate binder use, and baseline serum calcium, phosphorus and PTH concentrations were associated with PTX. Commercial cinacalcet was started in 443 (23%) patients (median PTH 1108 pg/mL before treatment began). Severe unremitting HPT developed in 470 (24%) patients. In a multivariable Cox model, the relative hazard (comparing patients randomized to cinacalcet versus placebo) of severe unremitting HPT was 0.31 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.37). The relative hazard differed little when adjusted by baseline clinical characteristics.Conclusions:Severe unremitting HPT develops frequently in patients on hemodialysis despite conventional therapy, and cinacalcet substantially reduces its occurrence.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 10/2013; 98(12). DOI:10.1210/jc.2013-2975 · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The amount of irreversible injury on renal allograft biopsy predicts function, but little is known about the early evolution of this damage. In a single-center cohort, we examined the relationship between donor-, recipient-, and transplantation-associated factors and change in a morphometric index of chronic damage (ICD) between protocol biopsies performed at implantation and at 2-3 months. We then investigated whether early delta ICD predicted subsequent biochemical outcomes. We found little evidence to support differences between the study group, who had undergone serial biopsies, and a contemporaneous control group, who had not. In allografts with serial biopsies (n = 162), there was an increase in ICD between implantation (median: 2%, IQR:0-8) and 2-3 months post-transplant (median 8% IQR:4-15; p < 0.0001). Donation from younger or live donors was independently associated with smaller early post-transplant increases in ICD. There was no evidence for a difference in delta ICD between donation after cardiac death vs. donation after brain death, nor association with length of cold ischemia. After adjustment for GFR at the time of the second biopsy, delta ICD after three months did not predict allograft function at one yr. These findings suggest that graft damage develops shortly after transplantation and reflects donor factors, but does not predict future biochemical outcomes.
    Clinical Transplantation 10/2013; DOI:10.1111/ctr.12251 · 1.49 Impact Factor
  • Richard Haynes, David C Wheeler
    Nature Reviews Nephrology 07/2013; DOI:10.1038/nrneph.2013.128 · 8.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral and bone disorder is associated with diverse metabolic and endocrine disturbances that ultimately may contribute to further loss of kidney function, bone demineralization, and fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular events. Recent insights into the pathophysiology of the events that unfold during the development of this disorder suggest that disturbances in phosphate metabolism are pivotal. The consequences of abnormal phosphate homeostasis are evident at estimated glomerular filtration rates <70 mL/min/1.73 m(2), long before serum phosphate levels increase. Healthy individuals with blood phosphate levels in the top quartile of the normal range have an increased risk of developing CKD, reaching end-stage renal disease, and experiencing cardiovascular events. Substantial public health consequences may be related to increased dietary phosphorus exposure from additives that contain phosphate in the food supply and from modest increases in serum phosphate levels; however, it remains to be established whether interventions aimed at these targets can impact on the development of adverse clinical outcomes. Current approaches involving dietary intervention and intestinal phosphate binders are based on principles and assumptions that need to be examined more rigorously. Compelling animal, observational, and clinical data indicate that interventions directed at lowering phosphate exposure and serum phosphate levels should be subject to rigorous clinical trials that use appropriate placebo comparators and focus on key clinical outcomes, such as cardiovascular events, progression of CKD, fractures, quality of life, and mortality.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 06/2013; 62(3). DOI:10.1053/j.ajkd.2013.03.042 · 5.76 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
898.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2015
    • University College London
      • Centre for Nephrology
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2012
    • Royal Free Academy of PMC
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • Harvard Medical School
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2005–2007
    • Universitair Ziekenhuis Ghent
      Gand, Flanders, Belgium
  • 1996–2003
    • University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
      • Department of Nephrology
      Birmingham, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 1998–2001
    • Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
  • 2000
    • University of Wales
      • College of Medicine
      Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
  • 1999–2000
    • The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
      Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia
    • University of Birmingham
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
  • 1988–1993
    • Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust
      • Department of Radiology
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom