D. T. Hill

University of St Andrews, Saint Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom

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Publications (16)64.23 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We use the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey (GAMA) I data set combined with GALEX, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) imaging to construct the low-redshift (z < 0.1) galaxy luminosity functions in FUV, NUV, ugriz and YJHK bands from within a single well-constrained volume of 3.4 x 10(5) (Mpc h(-1))(3). The derived luminosity distributions are normalized to the SDSS data release 7 (DR7) main survey to reduce the estimated cosmic variance to the 5 per cent level. The data are used to construct the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) from 0.1 to 2.1 mu m free from any wavelength-dependent cosmic variance for both the elliptical and non-elliptical populations. The two populations exhibit dramatically different CSEDs as expected for a predominantly old and young population, respectively. Using the Driver et al. prescription for the azimuthally averaged photon escape fraction, the non-ellipticals are corrected for the impact of dust attenuation and the combined CSED constructed. The final results show that the Universe is currently generating (1.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(35) h W Mpc(-3) of which (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10(35) h W Mpc-3 is directly released into the inter-galactic medium and (0.6 +/- 0.1) x 10(35) h W Mpc(-3) is reprocessed and reradiated by dust in the far-IR. Using the GAMA data and our dust model we predict the mid- and far-IR emission which agrees remarkably well with available data. We therefore provide a robust description of the pre- and post-dust attenuated energy output of the nearby Universe from 0.1 mu m to 0.6 mm. The largest uncertainty in this measurement lies in the mid- and far-IR bands stemming from the dust attenuation correction and its currently poorly constrained dependence on environment, stellar mass and morphology.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2012; 427(4):3244-3264. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.22036.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context: The mass-metallicity relationship (MMR) of star-forming galaxies is well-established, however there is still some disagreement with respect to its exact shape and its possible dependence on other observables. Aims: We measure the MMR in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We compare our measured MMR to that measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and study the dependence of the MMR on various selection criteria to identify potential causes for disparities seen in the literature. Methods: We use strong emission line ratio diagnostics to derive oxygen abundances. We then apply a range of selection criteria for the minimum signal-to-noise in various emission lines, as well as the apparent and absolute magnitude to study variations in the inferred MMR. Results: The shape and position of the MMR can differ significantly depending on the metallicity calibration and selection used. After selecting a robust metallicity calibration amongst those tested, we find that the mass-metallicity relation for redshifts 0.061< z<0.35 in GAMA is in reasonable agreement with that found in the SDSS despite the difference in the luminosity range probed. Conclusions: In view of the significant variations of the MMR brought about by reasonable changes in the sample selection criteria and method, we recommend that care be taken when comparing the MMR from different surveys and studies directly. We also conclude that there could be a modest level of evolution over 0.06<z<0.35 within the GAMA sample.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 11/2012; 547:A79. DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201220050 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use the GAMA I dataset combined with GALEX, SDSS and UKIDSS imaging to construct the low-redshift (z<0.1) galaxy luminosity functions in FUV, NUV, ugriz, and YJHK bands from within a single well constrained volume of 3.4 x 10^5 (Mpc/h)^{3}. The derived luminosity distributions are normalised to the SDSS DR7 main survey to reduce the estimated cosmic variance to the 5 per cent level. The data are used to construct the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) from 0.1 to 2.1 \mum free from any wavelength dependent cosmic variance for both the elliptical and non-elliptical populations. The two populations exhibit dramatically different CSEDs as expected for a predominantly old and young population respectively. Using the Driver et al. (2008) prescription for the azimuthally averaged photon escape fraction, the non-ellipticals are corrected for the impact of dust attenuation and the combined CSED constructed. The final results show that the Universe is currently generating (1.8 +/- 0.3) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} of which (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is directly released into the inter-galactic medium and (0.6 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is reprocessed and reradiated by dust in the far-IR. Using the GAMA data and our dust model we predict the mid and far-IR emission which agrees remarkably well with available data. We therefore provide a robust description of the pre- and post dust attenuated energy output of the nearby Universe from 0.1micron to 0.6mm. The largest uncertainty in this measurement lies in the mid and far-IR bands stemming from the dust attenuation correction and its currently poorly constrained dependence on environment, stellar mass, and morphology.
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    ABSTRACT: Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) is a project to study galaxy formation and evolution, combining imaging data from ultraviolet to radio with spectroscopic data from the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Using data from phase 1 of GAMA, taken over three observing seasons, and correcting for various minor sources of incompleteness, we calculate galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) and their evolution in the ugriz passbands. At low redshift, z < 0.1, we find that blue galaxies, defined according to a magnitude-dependent but non-evolving colour cut, are reasonably well fitted over a range of more than ten magnitudes by simple Schechter functions in all bands. Red galaxies, and the combined blue-plus-red sample, require double power-law Schechter functions to fit a dip in their LF faintwards of the characteristic magnitude M * before a steepening faint end. This upturn is at least partly due to dust-reddened disc galaxies. We measure evolution of the galaxy LF over the redshift range 0.002 < z < 0.5 both by using a parametric fit and by measuring binned LFs in redshift slices. The characteristic lumi-nosity L * is found to increase with redshift in all bands, with red galaxies showing stronger luminosity evolution than blue galaxies. The comoving number density of blue galaxies in-creases with redshift, while that of red galaxies decreases, consistent with prevailing move- 2 J. Loveday et al. ment from blue cloud to red sequence. As well as being more numerous at higher redshift, blue galaxies also dominate the overall luminosity density beyond redshifts z 0.2. At lower redshifts, the luminosity density is dominated by red galaxies in the riz bands, by blue galax-ies in u and g.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2011; 000(2):0-0. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.20111.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a technique to identify optical counterparts of 250-μm-selected sources from the Herschel–ATLAS survey. Of the 6621 250 μm > 32-mJy sources in our science demonstration catalogue we find that ∼60 per cent have counterparts brighter than r = 22.4 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Applying a likelihood ratio technique we are able to identify 2423 of the counterparts with a reliability R > 0.8. This is approximately 37 per cent of the full 250-μm catalogue. We have estimated photometric redshifts for each of these 2423 reliable counterparts, while 1099 also have spectroscopic redshifts collated from several different sources, including the GAMA survey. We estimate the completeness of identifying counterparts as a function of redshift, and present evidence that 250-μm-selected Herschel–ATLAS galaxies have a bimodal redshift distribution. Those with reliable optical identifications have a redshift distribution peaking at z ≈ 0.25 ± 0.05, while submillimetre colours suggest that a significant fraction with no counterpart above the r-band limit have z > 1. We also suggest a method for selecting populations of strongly lensed high-redshift galaxies. Our identifications are matched to UV–NIR photometry from the GAMA survey, and these data are available as part of the Herschel–ATLAS public data release.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 08/2011; 416(2):857 - 872. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.18827.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the properties of satellite galaxies that surround isolated hosts within the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.15, using data taken as part of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. Making use of isolation and satellite criteria that take into account stellar mass estimates, we find 3514 isolated galaxies of which 1426 host a total of 2998 satellites. Separating the red and blue populations of satellites and hosts, using colour-mass diagrams, we investigate the radial distribution of satellite galaxies and determine how the red fraction of satellites varies as a function of satellite mass, host mass and the projected distance from their host. Comparing the red fraction of satellites to a control sample of small neighbours at greater projected radii, we show that the increase in red fraction is primarily a function of host mass. The satellite red fraction is about 0.2 higher than the control sample for hosts with 11.0 < log M_* < 11.5, while the red fractions show no difference for hosts with 10.0 < log M_* < 10.5. For the satellites of more massive hosts the red fraction also increases as a function of decreasing projected distance. Our results suggest that the likely main mechanism for the quenching of star formation in satellites hosted by isolated galaxies is strangulation.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 07/2011; 417(2). DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19353.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using the complete GAMA-I survey covering ~142 sq. deg. to r=19.4, of which ~47 sq. deg. is to r=19.8, we create the GAMA-I galaxy group catalogue (G3Cv1), generated using a friends-of-friends (FoF) based grouping algorithm. Our algorithm has been tested extensively on one family of mock GAMA lightcones, constructed from Lambda-CDM N-body simulations populated with semi-analytic galaxies. Recovered group properties are robust to the effects of interlopers and are median unbiased in the most important respects. G3Cv1 contains 14,388 galaxy groups (with multiplicity >= 2$), including 44,186 galaxies out of a possible 110,192 galaxies, implying ~40% of all galaxies are assigned to a group. The similarities of the mock group catalogues and G3Cv1 are multiple: global characteristics are in general well recovered. However, we do find a noticeable deficit in the number of high multiplicity groups in GAMA compared to the mocks. Additionally, despite exceptionally good local spatial completeness, G3Cv1 contains significantly fewer compact groups with 5 or more members, this effect becoming most evident for high multiplicity systems. These two differences are most likely due to limitations in the physics included of the current GAMA lightcone mock. Further studies using a variety of galaxy formation models are required to confirm their exact origin.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 06/2011; 416(4). DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19217.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present an analysis of the properties of the lowest Halpha-luminosity galaxies (L_Halpha<4x10^32 W; SFR<0.02 Msun/yr) in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These galaxies make up the the rise above a Schechter function in the number density of systems seen at the faint end of the Halpha luminosity function. Above our flux limit we find that these galaxies are principally composed of intrinsically low stellar mass systems (median stellar mass =2.5x10^8 Msun) with only 5/90 having stellar masses M>10^10 Msun. The low SFR systems are found to exist predominantly in the lowest density environments (median density ~0.02 galaxy Mpc^-2 with none in environments more dense than ~1.5 galaxy Mpc^-2). Their current specific star formation rates (SSFR; -8.5 < log(SSFR[yr^-1])<-12.) are consistent with their having had a variety of star formation histories. The low density environments of these galaxies demonstrates that such low-mass, star-forming systems can only remain as low-mass and forming stars if they reside sufficiently far from other galaxies to avoid being accreted, dispersed through tidal effects or having their gas reservoirs rendered ineffective through external processes. Comment: 10 pages, accepted for publication in MNRAS
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2010; 413(2). DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.18210.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use data from the Herschel-ATLAS to investigate the evolution of the far-infrared–radio correlation over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.5. Using the total far-infrared luminosity of all >5σ sources in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Field and cross-matching these data with radio data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimetres (FIRST) survey and the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) Northern Sky Survey (NVSS), we obtain 104 radio counterparts to the Herschel sources. With these data we find no evidence for evolution in the far-infrared–radio correlation over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.5, where the median value for the ratio between far-infrared and radio luminosity, qIR, over this range is qIR= 2.40 ± 0.12 (and a mean of qIR= 2.52 ± 0.03 accounting for the lower limits), consistent with both the local value determined from IRAS and values derived from surveys targeting the high-redshift Universe. By comparing the radio fluxes of our sample measured from both FIRST and NVSS we show that previous results suggesting an increase in the value of qIR from high to low redshift may be the result of resolving out extended emission of the low-redshift sources with relatively high-resolution interferometric data, although contamination from active galactic nuclei could still play a significant role. We also find tentative evidence that the longer wavelength cooler dust is heated by an evolved stellar population which does not trace the star formation rate as closely as the shorter wavelength ≲ 250 μm emission or the radio emission, supporting suggestions based on detailed models of individual galaxies.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 11/2010; 409(1):92 - 101. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17772.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (ATLAS) science demonstration data to investigate the star formation properties of radio-selected galaxies in the GAMA-9h field as a function of radio luminosity and redshift. Radio selection at the lowest radio luminosities, as expected, selects mostly starburst galaxies. At higher radio luminosities, where the population is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN), we find that some individual objects are associated with high far-infrared luminosities. However, the far-infrared properties of the radio-loud population are statistically indistinguishable from those of a comparison population of radio-quiet galaxies matched in redshift and K-band absolute magnitude. There is thus no evidence that the host galaxies of these largely low-luminosity (Fanaroff–Riley class I), and presumably low-excitation, AGN, as a population, have particularly unusual star formation histories. Models in which the AGN activity in higher luminosity, high-excitation radio galaxies is triggered by major mergers would predict a luminosity-dependent effect that is not seen in our data (which only span a limited range in radio luminosity) but which may well be detectable with the full Herschel-ATLAS data set.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 11/2010; 409(1):122 - 131. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17791.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey has been operating since February 2008 on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope using the AAOmega fibre-fed spectrograph facility to acquire spectra with a resolution of R~1300 for 120,862 SDSS selected galaxies. The target catalogue constitutes three contiguous equatorial regions centred at 9h (G09), 12h (G12) and 14.5h (G15) each of 12 x 4 sq.deg to limiting fluxes of r < 19.4, r < 19.8, and r < 19.4 mag respectively (and additional limits at other wavelengths). Spectra and reliable redshifts have been acquired for over 98 per cent of the galaxies within these limits. Here we present the survey footprint, progression, data reduction, redshifting, re-redshifting, an assessment of data quality after 3 years, additional image analysis products (including ugrizYJHK photometry, Sersic profiles and photometric redshifts), observing mask, and construction of our core survey catalogue (GamaCore). From this we create three science ready catalogues: GamaCoreDR1 for public release, which includes data acquired during year 1 of operations within specified magnitude limits (February 2008 to April 2008); GamaCoreMainSurvey containing all data above our survey limits for use by the GAMA team and collaborators; and GamaCoreAtlasSv containing year 1, 2 and 3 data matched to Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration data. These catalogues along with the associated spectra, stamps and profiles can be accessed via the GAMA website: http://www.gama-survey.org/ Comment: Submitted to MNRAS. MySQL database and data downloads available now from http://www.gama-survey.org/
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 09/2010; 413(2). DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.18188.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a technique to identify optical counterparts of 250 um-selected sources from the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Of the 6621 250 um > 32 mJy sources in our science demonstration catalogue we find that ~60 percent have counterparts brighter than r=22.4 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Applying a likelihood ratio technique we are able to identify 2423 of the counterparts with a reliability R > 0.8. This is approximately 37 percent of the full 250 micron catalogue. We have estimated photometric redshifts for each of these 2423 reliable counterparts, while 1099 also have spectroscopic redshifts collated from several different sources, including the GAMA survey. We estimate the completeness of identifying counterparts as a function of redshift, and present evidence that 250 um-selected Herschel-ATLAS galaxies have a bimodal redshift distribution. Those with reliable optical identifications have a redshift distribution peaking at z ~ 0.25 +/- 0.05, while sub-mm colours suggest that a significant fraction with no counterpart above the r-band limit have z > 1. We also suggest a method for selecting populations of strongly-lensed high redshift galaxies. Our identifications are matched to UV--NIR photometry from the GAMA survey, and these data are available as part of the Herschel-ATLAS public data release.
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    ABSTRACT: A heuristic greedy algorithm is developed for efficiently tiling spatially dense redshift surveys. In its first application to the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey we find it rapidly improves the spatial uniformity of our data, and naturally corrects for any spatial bias introduced by the 2dF multi object spectrograph. We make conservative predictions for the final state of the GAMA redshift survey after our final allocation of time, and can be confident that even if worse than typical weather affects our observations, all of our main survey requirements will be met. Comment: 14 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in PASA, high quality version available at http://www.eso.org/~jliske/gama/pubs.html
    Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia 10/2009; 27(01). DOI:10.1071/AS09053 · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the spectroscopic target selection for the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The input catalogue is drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The aim is to measure redshifts for galaxies in three 4x12 degree regions at 9h, 12h and 14.5h, on the celestial equator, with magnitude selections r < 19.4, z < 18.2 and K(AB) < 17.6 over all three regions, and r < 19.8 in the 12-h region. The target density is 1080 per sq. deg. in the 12-h region and 720 per sq. deg. in the other regions. The average GAMA target density and area are compared with completed and ongoing galaxy redshift surveys. The GAMA survey implements a highly complete star-galaxy separation that jointly uses an intensity-profile separator (delta(sg) = r-band psf mag - model mag) as per the SDSS) and a colour separator. The colour separator is defined as delta(sg,jk) = J - K - f(g-i), where f(g-i) is a quadratic fit to the J-K colour of the stellar locus over the range 0.3 < g-i < 2.3. All galaxy populations investigated are well separated with delta(sg,jk) > 0.2. From two years out of a three-year AAOmega program on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, we have obtained 79599 unique galaxy redshifts. Previously known redshifts in the GAMA region bring the total up to 98497. The median galaxy redshift is 0.2 with 99% at z < 0.5. We present some of the global statistical properties of the survey, including K-band galaxy counts, colour-redshift relations and preliminary n(z). Comment: 15 pages, 15 figures, accepted by MNRAS; v2 includes new figure with K-band galaxy counts, more description of UKIDSS reduction, and other minor changes
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2009; DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16282.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The stellar initial mass function (IMF) describes the distribution in stellar masses produced from a burst of star formation. For more than fifty years, the implicit as-sumption underpinning most areas of research involving the IMF has been that it is universal, regardless of time and environment. We measure the high–mass IMF slope for a sample of low–to–moderate redshift galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assem-bly survey. The large range in luminosities and galaxy masses of the sample permits the exploration of underlying IMF dependencies. A strong IMF–star formation rate dependency is discovered, which shows that highly star forming galaxies form pro-portionally more massive stars (they have IMFs with flatter power–law slopes) than galaxies with low star formation rates. This has a significant impact on a wide vari-ety of galaxy evolution studies, all of which rely on assumptions about the slope of the IMF. Our result is supported by, and provides an explanation for, the results of numerous recent explorations suggesting a variation of or evolution in the IMF.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 05/2002; 000(2):1-18. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.18800.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use data from the Herschel-ATLAS to investigate the evolution of the far-infrared?radio correlation over the redshift range 0 ensuremath< z ensuremath< 0.5. Using the total far-infrared luminosity of all ensuremath>5? sources in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Field and cross-matching these data with radio data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimetres (FIRST) survey and the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) Northern Sky Survey (NVSS), we obtain 104 radio counterparts to the Herschel sources.With these data we find no evidence for evolution in the far-infrared?radio correlation over the redshift range 0 ensuremath< z ensuremath< 0.5, where the median value for the ratio between far-infrared and radio luminosity, qIR, over this range is qIR =2.40Â$pm$0.12 (and a mean of qIR = 2.52 Â$pm$ 0.03 accounting for the lower limits), consistent with both the local value determined from IRAS and values derived from surveys targeting the high-redshift Universe. By comparing the radio fluxes of our sample measured from both FIRST and NVSS we show that previous results suggesting an increase in the value of qIR from high to low redshift may be the result of resolving out extended emission of the low-redshift sources with relatively high-resolution interferometric data, although contamination from active galactic nuclei could still play a significant role. We also find tentative evidence that the longer wavelength cooler dust is heated by an evolved stellar population which does not trace the star formation rate as closely as the shorter wavelength ensuremath<ensuremath textttchar126ensuremath<?subensuremath>250 ?m emission or the radio emission, supporting suggestions based on detailed models of individual galaxies.

Publication Stats

394 Citations
64.23 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2012
    • University of St Andrews
      • School of Physics and Astronomy
      Saint Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom
    • University of Nottingham
      • School of Physics and Astronomy
      Nottingham, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2002–2011
    • Scottish Universities Physics Alliance
      Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom