Bhardwaj DN

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, NCT, India

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Publications (41)8.22 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Death in custody causes one of the most embarrassing situation for the law enforcement agencies and medicolegal experts. The doctors has to follow the guidelines given by National Human Rights Commission while conducting postmortem examination in such cases and many a times doctors have been blamed for giving a biased opinion under influence to protect the interests of police and jail officials. This paper discusses postmortem examination in cases of custodial deaths and incidence of custodial death in India as well as other parts of the world. The cases of custodial deaths for which autopsy was conducted at AIIMS has also been discussed.
    Journal of the Indian Medical Association 03/2008; 106(2):101, 104, 106.
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    ABSTRACT: This prospective study was conducted at South Delhi, India over period of about two years at casualty of a tertiary hospital. A total number of 207 cases were examined during this period, 90 (43.47%) were victims of sexual assault and 117 (56.53%) were accused (offenders). Both were brought to the Casualty for medical examination. South Delhi is thickly populated with people ranging from lower socio-economic group to high income group of varied occupation. It also has thick population of migrant workers from rural India and neighboring countries. This study was planned to make medical examination more objective and meaningful in view of increasing crime rate. This study revealed that maximum number of victims (25.55%) were brought for medical examination 5-7 days after the incident. Maximum number of assailants (47%) brought for medical examination 5- 14 days after the incidence. Majority i.e. 62(68.88%) of alleged rape victims were in the age group between 11 to 20 year. In a total 90 alleged sexual offence victims, 80 (88.88%) were female victims and 10 (11.11%) were male victims. Victim and accused were brought together for medical examination in 41(19.80%) cases. Maximum numbers (64.10%) of assailants were of the age group of 16 to 25 year. In maximum number incidence of sexual offences occurred in victims’ houses (41.11%) followed by in assailant’s house (28.88%). From education point of view 28.88% of victims were illiterate, 33.33% of victims were literate up to class V (primary) standard. 92.22% of victims and 88.88% of assailants were from low socio-economic group. In term of relations of assailants with their victims, 44.44% were having acquaintance and 18.80% were complete strangers. 25.55% victims were involved in forcible rape, 43.33% were involved in consensual rape. Only 11.11% were involved in unnatural sexual offences and most of the victims were all male in sodomy cases. Only 25.55% victims of alleged rape cases had some physical injuries which varied from simple to grievous injuries. In 85.55% of rape victims rupture of hymen was seen at multiple sites, but all were old ruptures. One (1.11%) victim of alleged rape case became pregnant following rape and delivered a Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, 11029, India Abstract Mal J For Path Sci (June 2008); Vol.3 No.2 8 full term male baby in the casualty. Forensic materials were collected from victims in 81.11% cases. The results were positive in 5.55% of cases. Forensic materials were collected from assailant in 21.36% cases. The results were positive in 0.85% of cases. The single, separated, divorced, or widowed female i.e. without a mate, is five times more prone to sexual assault than the married, and those having the mate with her. Area populated by factory and industrial labour , and slum clusters had highest number of cases.
    Mal J For Path Sci. 01/2008; 3:7-44.
  • D N Bhardwaj, T Millo, S Lalwani
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    ABSTRACT: Knowledge of human anatomy is essential for all those practising medicine. The human skeleton is invariably used to study the anatomy of body structures. For this, many human skeletons are obtained from the market by students and teachers and are kept at home or in hostel rooms. However, after use the skeleton has to be disposed off properly. In the present case, a human skeleton used for study purposes was thrown away in garbage and someone informed the police about presence of skeletal remains in the garbage. The case was registered by the police and the skeletal remains were brought for medico-legal autopsy.
    Medicine, science, and the law 02/2007; 47(1):86-7. · 0.48 Impact Factor
  • R Rautji, D N Bhardwaj, T D Dogra
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    ABSTRACT: Anatomic trauma scoring systems are fundamental to trauma research. The Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and its derivative, the Injury Severity Score (ISS), are the most frequently used scales. In a prospective study, 400 autopsies of road traffic accident victims performed between January 2002 and December 2003 were coded according to the AIS and ISS methods. All the cases were classified into different injury groups according to the Injury Severity Scale. Fifty-eight cases (14.5%) were assigned an ISS value of <25; 244 (61%) cases were valued between 25-49; 38 cases (9.5%) were valued between 50-74 and 60 (15%) cases had a value of 75. On analysis of medical care, in cases with ISS<50, about 96% of the victims did not receive optimal care quickly enough with a lack of pre-hospital resuscitation measures and lengthy transportation time to hospital being of major importance.
    Medicine, science, and the law 04/2006; 46(2):157-65. · 0.48 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Indian Journal of Community Medicine. 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION Of all the crimes, sex related crimes arethe most barbarous and humiliating.Women and children remain the mostvulnerable group to this crime. Thealarming rise in the rate of sexual assaultworldwide represents a major public healthproblem.1In USA an estimate of one in every fourwomen and children,2 and in Nigeria fourout of every ten women are victims ofsexual assault.3 Incidence of rape in SouthAfrica is approximately 300 per 100,000women.4 In India over the last five years,rape cases have shown alternate increasingand decreasing trends with increase of 6.6per cent in year 2000 over 1999 and adecline of 2.5 per cent in year 2001. In year2001, a total of 16,075 (1.6 per 100,000population) cases of rape against womenand 2,113 (0.2 per 100,000 population) casesof child rape were reported all over India.This represents 11.2 per cent and 19.5 percent of total crime against women and
    Journal of Family welfare. 01/2005; 51:60-66.
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    ABSTRACT: A 29-year-old male was found dead lying in a pool of blood inside a community toilet locked from inside. The individual is alleged to have committed suicide by cutting his throat with a safety razor blade, which was found at the scene by the investigating police authority. The deceased, as per his relatives, was suffering from depression for the last few days.
    Forensic Science International 06/2004; 142(1):33-5. · 2.31 Impact Factor
  • D N Bhardwaj, R Rautji, R K Sharma, T D Dogra
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    ABSTRACT: Autoerotic asphyxial activity may at times result in unexpected death. Although the majority of deaths that occur during autoerotic asphyxial episodes are accidental, the possibility of suicide must always be entertained. In the case presented here, a 22-year-old married male was found hanging by his neck in his bedroom, which was locked from the inside. He was suspended by a 'lungi' (male wrap-around cloth) from the ceiling fan hook in his room, with his feet touching the ground. He was dressed in a brassiere, panties, and silver anklets. There was no evidence of previous perverse behaviour, and investigation disclosed no evidence of previous autoerotic sexual activity, homosexual behaviour, drug abuse or suicidal ideation.
    Medicine, science, and the law 05/2004; 44(2):173-5. · 0.48 Impact Factor
  • Indian Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology. 01/2004; 2.
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    ABSTRACT: In cases of sudden death, in the presence of preexisting disease, determination of the actual cause of death has profound Medico-legal significance. In order to arrive at an accurate conclusion, a complete workup of the case is required to be carried out. The present case report illustrates how a suicide using multiple means was detected through a thorough examination in a case that was reported to be that of sudden natural deulh in the Police inquest report.
    International Journal of Medical Toxicology and Legal Medicine. 01/2004; 7.
  • D N BHARDWAJ, R RAUTJI, R K SHARMA, T D DOGRA
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Autoerotic asphyxial activity may at times result in unexpected death. Although the majority of deaths that occur during autoerotic asphyxial episodes are accidental, the possibility of suicide must always be entertained. In the case presented here, a 22-year-old married male was found hanging by his neck in his bedroom, which was locked from the inside. He was suspended by a ‘lungi’ (male wrap-around cloth) from the ceiling fan hook in his room, with his feet touching the ground. He was dressed in a brassière, panties, and silver anklets. There was no evidence of previous perverse behaviour, and investigation disclosed no evidence of previous autoerotic sexual activity, homosexual behaviour, drug abuse or suicidal ideation.
    Medicine, science, and the law 01/2004; 44(2):173-175. · 0.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 20-year-old girl along with four of her friends, all in their early 20s, met with a fatal accident in the early hours of the day. Their car was hit by a speeding truck at a crossing. All the occupants of the car sustained multiple injuries and died on the spot. The girl was decapitated in the accident. Her head was recovered outside the mangled remains of the vehicle and the rest of the body was extracted from the co-driver's seat of the damaged vehicle.
    Forensic Science International 09/2003; 135(3):237-8. · 2.31 Impact Factor
  • Indian Medical Gazette. 01/2001; CXXXV 134:88-91.
  • Internet journal For. Med. 01/2001; 2:6.
  • S Gupta, D N Bhardwaj, T D Dogra
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    ABSTRACT: Since the legal consequences taking in consideration of Indian evidence Act 1857 of an unwarranted release of confidential information are uncertain and even the consequences may be serious, it is necessary that a physician be most cautious when divulging any information about a patient. Although there are exceptions to the proposition that all confidential information acquired from a patient should be kept secret, the basic rule to remember is that confidential information should not be revealed without obtaining the patient's consent unless law of the land like provision in criminal procedure code of India requires the physician to report the information, to any person or insurance company. Whenever a physician believes it is necessary to reveal a professional secret to protect the welfare of a patient, a third person, or the community, he should exercise caution in the method of disclosure. The following suggestions have been made to guide physicians under these circumstances: 1. Assure yourself that the person informed is sometime entitled to the information, such as the patient's parent or guardian. 2. Do not give information by telephone if you do not recognize the voice of the person making the request. 3. Avoid the use of telegrams or letters to communicate medical information of patient. 4. If you are in doubt about your right to release the information consult your legal council. 5. A person in police custody as an undertrial prisoner has the right not to permit the doctor who has examined him, to disclose the nature of his illness to any person. If a person is convicted, he has no right and the doctor can disclose the result to the authorities. 6. Never release the treatment history without written consent from patient or its legal heirs to any insurance company.
    Indian Journal of Medical Sciences 11/1999; 53(10):429-33. · 1.67 Impact Factor
  • Bhardwaj DN, Dogra TD
    01/1998: pages 185-188;
  • Sinha Alpana, Singh D, Bhardwaj DN, Dogra T.D
    J. of Hosp. Adm. 01/1998; 10:73-74.
  • Sinha A, Dogra T.D, Bhardwaj DN
    Indian Medical Journal. 01/1995; 89:7-11.
  • Sinha A, Sharma RK, Dogra T.D, Bhardwaj DN
    Indian journal of clinical practice. 01/1994; 5:45-46.
  • Dogra TD, Sinha A, Bhardwaj DN
    Proceeding of update on emergency care. 01/1994;

Publication Stats

21 Citations
8.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1992–2007
    • All India Institute of Medical Sciences
      • Department of Forensic Medicine
      New Delhi, NCT, India
  • 2006
    • Armed Forces Medical College
      • Department of Forensic Medicine
      Poona, Mahārāshtra, India