Colin P Derdeyn

Washington University in St. Louis, San Luis, Missouri, United States

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Publications (251)1187.3 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A variant of perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (PSAH) has been described characterized by blood centered in the quadrigeminal cistern and limited to the superior vermian and perimesencephalic cisterns. Herein, three cases of quadrigeminal PSAH are presented. Medical records of all patients who underwent digital subtraction angiography for evaluation of non-traumatic SAH between July 2002 and April 2012 were reviewed. Patients with anterior circulation aneurysms were excluded. Two blinded reviewers identified admission noncontrast CT scans with pretruncal and quadrigeminal patterns of PSAH. The total cohort included 106 patients: 53% (56/106) with one or more negative digital subtraction angiograms and 47% (50/106) with posterior circulation or posterior communicating artery aneurysms. Three patients with quadrigeminal PSAH were identified, two with nonaneurysmal SAH and one with a posterior circulation aneurysm. Seventeen patients (16%; 17/106) with pretruncal PSAH were identified, none of whom were found to have an aneurysm. The quadrigeminal pattern comprised 11% (2/19) of cases of pretruncal or quadrigeminal nonaneurysmal PSAH. A small subset of patients with nonaneurysmal PSAH present with blood centered in the quadrigeminal cistern, and the etiology of this pattern may be similar to that of the classic pretruncal variant. However, patients with quadrigeminal PSAH must still undergo thorough vascular imaging, including at least two digital subtraction angiograms, to exclude a ruptured aneurysm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Clinical neurology and neurosurgery 10/2015; 137:67-71. DOI:10.1016/j.clineuro.2015.06.018 · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Arindam R Chatterjee, Colin P Derdeyn
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    ABSTRACT: Angioplasty and stenting for intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) are a last resort for patients with high-grade intracranial stenosis with multiple ischemic events unresponsive to medical therapy. Medical management, consisting of aggressive risk factor control and dual antiplatelet therapy, is superior to angioplasty and stenting for the prevention of future stroke. Future studies of angioplasty and stenting in this population are important, as the stroke risk on medical therapy is 12 % at 1 year and post-procedure stroke rates are similar to rates with medical treatment. There are many issues that will need to be resolved for stenting to offer any benefit, however. Procedural risks of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke are unacceptably high. High-risk subgroups, potentially based on hemodynamic factors, will need to be identified for future interventional trials. Nevertheless, it is still reasonable to consider angioplasty and stenting for selected patients with multiple recurrent events despite aggressive medical management, but benefits are unclear at this time.
    Current Atherosclerosis Reports 08/2015; 17(8):527. DOI:10.1007/s11883-015-0527-4 · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this guideline is to provide a focused update of the current recommendations for the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Where there is overlap, the recommendations made here supersede those of previous guidelines. This focused update analyzes results from 8 randomized clinical trials of endovascular treatment and other relevant data published since 2013. It is not intended to be a complete literature review from the date of the previous guideline publication but rather to include pivotal new evidence that justifies changes in current recommendations. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Manuscript Oversight Committee (MOC). Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Recommendations follow the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association methods of classifying the level of certainty of the treatment effect and the class of evidence. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 6 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the selection of patients with acute ischemic stroke for endovascular treatment, the endovascular procedure and for systems of care to facilitate endovascular treatment. Certain endovascular procedures have been demonstrated to provide clinical benefit in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. Systems of care should be organized to facilitate the delivery of this care. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Stroke 06/2015; DOI:10.1161/STR.0000000000000074 · 6.02 Impact Factor
  • Stroke 06/2015; DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.009479 · 6.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Atherosclerotic vertebrobasilar disease is an important cause of posterior circulation stroke. To examine the role of hemodynamic compromise, a prospective multicenter study, Vertebrobasilar Flow Evaluation and Risk of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke (VERiTAS), was conducted. Here, we report clinical features and vessel flow measurements from the study cohort. Patients with recent vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attack or stroke and ≥50% atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion in vertebral or basilar arteries (BA) were enrolled. Large-vessel flow in the vertebrobasilar territory was assessed using quantitative MRA. The cohort (n=72; 44% women) had a mean age of 65.6 years; 72% presented with ischemic stroke. Hypertension (93%) and hyperlipidemia (81%) were the most prevalent vascular risk factors. BA flows correlated negatively with percentage stenosis in the affected vessel and positively to the minimal diameter at the stenosis site (P<0.01). A relative threshold effect was evident, with flows dropping most significantly with ≥80% stenosis/occlusion (P<0.05). Tandem disease involving the BA and either/both vertebral arteries had the greatest negative impact on immediate downstream flow in the BA (43 mL/min versus 71 mL/min; P=0.01). Distal flow status assessment, based on an algorithm incorporating collateral flow by examining distal vessels (BA and posterior cerebral arteries), correlated neither with multifocality of disease nor with severity of the maximal stenosis. Flow in stenotic posterior circulation vessels correlates with residual diameter and drops significantly with tandem disease. However, distal flow status, incorporating collateral capacity, is not well predicted by the severity or location of the disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Stroke 05/2015; DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.009215 · 6.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: North American and Asian forms of moyamoya have distinct clinical characteristics. Asian adults with moyamoya are known to respond better to direct versus indirect revascularization. It is unclear whether North American adults with moyamoya have a similar long-term angiographic response to direct versus indirect bypass. A retrospective review of surgical revascularization for adult moyamoya phenomenon was performed. Preoperative and postoperative cerebral angiograms underwent consensus review, with degree of revascularization quantified as extent of new middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory filling. Late angiographic follow-up was available in 15 symptomatic patients who underwent 20 surgical revascularization procedures. In 10 hemispheres treated solely with indirect arterial bypass, 3 had 2/3 revascularization, 4 had 1/3 revascularization, and 3 had no revascularization of the MCA territory. In the 10 hemispheres treated with direct arterial bypass (8 as a stand-alone procedure and 2 in combination with an indirect procedure), 2 had complete revascularization, 7 had 2/3 revascularization, and 1 had 1/3 revascularization. Direct bypass provided a higher rate of "good" angiographic outcome (complete or 2/3 revascularization) when compared with indirect techniques (P = .0198). Direct bypass provides a statistically significant, more consistent, and complete cerebral revascularization than indirect techniques in this patient population. This is similar to that reported in the Asian literature, which suggests that the manner of presentation (ischemia in North American adults versus hemorrhage in Asian adults) is likely not a contributor to the extent of revascularization achieved after surgical intervention. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases: the official journal of National Stroke Association 05/2015; 24(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2015.03.053 · 1.99 Impact Factor
  • Laurent Pierot, Colin Derdeyn
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    ABSTRACT: Three recently published trials have conclusively proven the benefit of mechanical endovascular thrombectomy over best medical therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion. These trials shared some features and differed in others. These similarities and differences in trial design and execution affect the conclusions and recommendations that can be made from the data. We will examine the implications of these studies for neurointerventionists, both for current practice and for future studies. In particular, we will focus on procedural details such as patient selection, devices, adjunctive therapies, treatment time windows, and performance metrics. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Stroke 05/2015; 46(6). DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.008416 · 6.02 Impact Factor
  • Stroke 04/2015; 46(6). DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.008739 · 6.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (PSAH) is not consistently defined in the existing literature. The purpose of this study was to test the inter-observer variability and specificity for non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of an anatomic definition of PSAH. Medical records of all patients who underwent catheter angiography for evaluation of non-traumatic SAH between July 2002 and April 2012 were reviewed. Patients with anterior circulation aneurysms were excluded. Three blinded reviewers assessed whether each admission CT scan met the following anatomic criteria for PSAH: (1) center of bleeding located immediately anterior and in contact with the brainstem in the prepontine, interpeduncular, or posterior suprasellar cistern; (2) blood limited to the prepontine, interpeduncular, suprasellar, crural, ambient, and/or quadrigeminal cisterns and/or cisterna magna; (3) no extension of blood into the Sylvian or interhemispheric fissures; (4) intraventricular blood limited to incomplete filling of the fourth ventricle and occipital horns of the lateral ventricles (ie, consistent with reflux); (5) no intraparenchymal blood. 56 patients with non-aneurysmal SAH and 50 patients with posterior circulation or posterior communicating artery aneurysms were identified. Seventeen (16%) of the 106 admission CT scans met the anatomic criteria for PSAH. No aneurysm was identified in this subgroup. Inter-observer agreement was excellent with κ scores of 0.89-0.96 and disagreement in 2.8% (3/106) of cases. Our anatomic definition of PSAH correlated with a low risk of brain aneurysm and was applied with excellent inter-observer agreement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery 03/2015; DOI:10.1136/neurintsurg-2015-011680 · 2.77 Impact Factor
  • Marc I Chimowitz, Colin P Derdeyn
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 03/2015; 313(12):1219-20. DOI:10.1001/jama.2015.1276 · 30.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Penumbral biomarkers promise to individualize treatment windows in acute ischemic stroke. We used a novel magnetic resonance imaging approach that measures oxygen metabolic index (OMI), a parameter closely related to positron emission tomography-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO2), to derive a pair of ischemic thresholds: (1) an irreversible-injury threshold that differentiates ischemic core from penumbra and (2) a reversible-injury threshold that differentiates penumbra from tissue not-at-risk for infarction. METHODS: Forty patients with acute ischemic stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging at 3 time points after stroke onset: <4.5 hours (for OMI threshold derivation), 6 hours (to determine reperfusion status), and 1 month (for infarct probability determination). A dynamic susceptibility contrast method measured cerebral blood flow, and an asymmetrical spin echo sequence measured oxygen extraction fraction, to derive OMI (OMI=cerebral blood flow×oxygen extraction fraction). Putative ischemic threshold pairs were iteratively tested using a computation-intensive method to derive infarct probabilities in 3 tissue groups defined by the thresholds (core, penumbra, and not-at-risk tissue). An optimal threshold pair was chosen based on its ability to predict infarction in the core, reperfusion-dependent survival in the penumbra, and survival in not-at-risk tissue. The predictive abilities of the thresholds were then tested within the same cohort using a 10-fold cross-validation method. RESULTS: The optimal OMI ischemic thresholds were found to be 0.28 and 0.42 of normal values in the contralateral hemisphere. Using the 10-fold cross-validation method, median infarct probabilities were 90.6% for core, 89.7% for nonreperfused penumbra, 9.95% for reperfused penumbra, and 6.28% for not-at-risk tissue. CONCLUSIONS: OMI thresholds, derived using voxel-based, reperfusion-dependent infarct probabilities, delineated the ischemic penumbra with high predictive ability. These thresholds will require confirmation in an independent patient sample.
    Stroke 02/2015; · 6.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Penumbral biomarkers promise to individualize treatment windows in acute ischemic stroke. We used a novel magnetic resonance imaging approach that measures oxygen metabolic index (OMI), a parameter closely related to positron emission tomography-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO2), to derive a pair of ischemic thresholds: (1) an irreversible-injury threshold that differentiates ischemic core from penumbra and (2) a reversible-injury threshold that differentiates penumbra from tissue not-at-risk for infarction. Forty patients with acute ischemic stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging at 3 time points after stroke onset: <4.5 hours (for OMI threshold derivation), 6 hours (to determine reperfusion status), and 1 month (for infarct probability determination). A dynamic susceptibility contrast method measured cerebral blood flow, and an asymmetrical spin echo sequence measured oxygen extraction fraction, to derive OMI (OMI=cerebral blood flow×oxygen extraction fraction). Putative ischemic threshold pairs were iteratively tested using a computation-intensive method to derive infarct probabilities in 3 tissue groups defined by the thresholds (core, penumbra, and not-at-risk tissue). An optimal threshold pair was chosen based on its ability to predict infarction in the core, reperfusion-dependent survival in the penumbra, and survival in not-at-risk tissue. The predictive abilities of the thresholds were then tested within the same cohort using a 10-fold cross-validation method. The optimal OMI ischemic thresholds were found to be 0.28 and 0.42 of normal values in the contralateral hemisphere. Using the 10-fold cross-validation method, median infarct probabilities were 90.6% for core, 89.7% for nonreperfused penumbra, 9.95% for reperfused penumbra, and 6.28% for not-at-risk tissue. OMI thresholds, derived using voxel-based, reperfusion-dependent infarct probabilities, delineated the ischemic penumbra with high predictive ability. These thresholds will require confirmation in an independent patient sample. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Stroke 02/2015; 46(4). DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.008154 · 6.02 Impact Factor
  • 02/2015; 76(S 01). DOI:10.1055/s-0035-1546618
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    ABSTRACT: Stenting has been used as a rescue therapy in patients with intracranial arterial stenosis and a transient ischemic attack or stroke when on antithrombotic therapy (AT). We determined whether the stenting versus aggressive medical therapy for intracranial arterial stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial supported this approach by comparing the treatments within subgroups of patients whose qualifying event (QE) occurred on versus off of AT. The primary outcome, 30-day stroke and death and later strokes in the territory of the qualifying artery, was compared between (1) percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting plus aggressive medical therapy (PTAS) versus aggressive medical management therapy alone (AMM) for patients whose QE occurred on versus off AT and between (2) patients whose QE occurred on versus off AT separately for the treatment groups. Among the 284/451 (63%) patients who had their QE on AT, the 2-year primary end point rates were 15.6% for those randomized to AMM (n=140) and 21.6% for PTAS (n=144; P=0.043, log-rank test). In the 167 patients not on AT, the 2-year primary end point rates were 11.6% for AMM (n=87) and 18.8% for PTAS (n=80; P=0.31, log-rank test). Within both treatment groups, there was no difference in the time to the primary end point between patients who were on or off AT (AMM, P=0.96; PTAS, P=0.52; log-rank test). SAMMPRIS results indicate that the benefit of AMM over PTAS is similar in patients on versus off AT at the QE and that failure of AT is not a predictor of increased risk of a primary end point. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00576693. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Stroke 01/2015; 46(3). DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.007752 · 6.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) and thoracic ascending aortic aneurysms (TAAs) in a retrospective cohort of patients treated for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Patients treated for IA at our institution between 2002 and 2011 were identified and their clinical records reviewed. Those without an echocardiogram of sufficient quality to assess the aortic valve were excluded. The prevalence of BAVs and TAAs in this remaining cohort was determined based on echocardiography reports, medical records, and cross-sectional chest imaging. Of 1,047 patients, 317 had adequate echocardiography for assessment of BAV. Of these, 82 also had cross-sectional chest imaging. Of the 317 patients, 2 had BAV and 15 had TAA. The prevalence of BAVs (0.6%, 95% confidence interval 0.2%-2.2%) was similar to population prevalence estimates for this condition; however, the prevalence of TAAs (4.7%, 95% confidence interval 2.9%-7.6%) was larger than expected in a normal age- and sex-matched population. Our data demonstrate an association between IA and TAA, but not independently for BAV. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.
    Neurology 11/2014; 84(1). DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000001104 · 8.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While the use of intraoperative angiography (IA) has been shown to be a useful adjunct in aneurysm surgery, its routine use remains controversial. We wished to determine if IA is required in all patients undergoing aneurysm surgery (ie, routine IA) or if intraoperative assessment can reliably predict the need for IA (ie, select IA). We prospectively evaluated all patients undergoing craniotomy for aneurysm clipping. In these patients, the treating surgeons were asked to record whether they felt IA was required at two time points: (1) prior to surgery and (2) immediately after clip application but before IA. All patients underwent IA as per the institutional protocol. IA results and the need for post-IA clip adjustments were recorded. Of the 200 patients enrolled, 197 were included for analysis. IA was deemed necessary on preoperative assessment in 144 cases (73%) and on post-clip assessment in 116 cases (59%). Post-clip IA demonstrated 47 (24%) positive findings and post-IA clip adjustments were made in 19 of 198 cases (10%). On preoperative assessment, there were four cases where IA was deemed unnecessary, yet post-IA clip adjustment was required, resulting in a sensitivity of 79% and false negative rate of 8%. Regarding post-clip assessment, there were five cases where IA was thought to be unnecessary and clip adjustment was required, resulting in a sensitivity of 73% and false negative rate of 6%. The accuracy of a strategy of select IA was not improved by assessing the need for IA immediately after aneurysm clipping versus prior to surgery onset. This suggests that intraoperative assessment regarding the adequacy of aneurysm clip application should be viewed with caution. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery 11/2014; DOI:10.1136/neurintsurg-2014-011515 · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this study was to measure the flux of amyloid-β (Aβ) across the human cerebral capillary bed in order to determine if transport into the blood is a significant mechanism of clearance for Aβ produced in the central nervous system (CNS).Methods: Time-matched blood samples were simultaneously collected from a cerebral vein (including the sigmoid sinus, inferior petrosal sinus, and the internal jugular vein), femoral vein, and radial artery of patients undergoing Inferior Petrosal Sinus Sampling (IPSS). For each plasma sample, Aβ concentration was assessed by three assays and the venous to arterial Aβ concentration ratios were determined.Results: Aβ concentration was increased by ~7.5% in venous blood leaving the CNS capillary bed compared to arterial blood, indicating efflux from the CNS into the peripheral blood (p < 0.0001). There was no difference in peripheral venous Aβ concentration compared to arterial blood concentration.Interpretation: Our results are consistent with clearance of CNS-derived Aβ into the venous blood supply with no increase from a peripheral capillary bed. Modeling these results suggests that direct transport of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier accounts for ~25% of Aβ clearance, and reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ accounts for ~25% of the total CNS Aβ clearance in humans. ANN NEUROL 2014. © 2014 American Neurological Association
    Annals of Neurology 09/2014; DOI:10.1002/ana.24270 · 11.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Object Most patients with asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms treated with endovascular methods are closely observed overnight in an intensive care unit setting for complications, including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, cardiac dysfunction, and groin access complications. The purpose of this study was to analyze the timing, nature, and rate of in-house postoperative events. Methods Patients who underwent endovascular treatment or retreatment of unruptured cerebral aneurysms from March 2002 to June 2012 were identified from a prospective case log and their medical records were reviewed. The presentation, patient characteristics, aneurysm size and location, and method of endovascular treatment of each cerebral aneurysm were recorded. Patients with adverse intraprocedural events including perforation and thromboembolism were excluded from this analysis. Overnight postprocedural monitoring was performed in a neurological intensive care unit or postanesthesia care unit for all patients, with discharge planned for postoperative Day 1. Postprocedural events occurring during hospitalization were categorized as intracranial hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, groin hematoma resulting in additional treatment or prolonged hospital stay, retroperitoneal hematoma, and cardiac events. The time from the completion of the procedure to event discovery was recorded. Results A total of 687 endovascular treatments of unruptured cerebral aneurysms were performed. Nine treatments were excluded from our analysis due to intraprocedural events. Endovascular procedures included coiling alone, stent-assisted coiling, balloon-assisted coiling, balloon-assisted embolization with a liquid embolic agent, and placement of a flow diversion device with or without coiling. Twenty-seven treatments (4.0%) resulted in postprocedural complications: 3 intracranial hemorrhages, 6 ischemic strokes, 4 cardiac events, 5 retroperitoneal hematomas, and 9 groin hematomas. The majority (20 [74.0%]) of these 27 complications were detected within 4 hours from the procedure. These included 1 hemorrhage, 4 ischemic strokes, 4 cardiac events, 2 retroperitoneal hematomas, and 9 groin hematomas. All cardiac events and groin hematomas were detected within 4 hours. Four (14%) of the 27 complications were detected between 4 and 12 hours, 1 (3.7%) between 12 and 24 hours, and 2 (7.4%) more than 24 hours after the procedure. The complications detected more than 4 hours from the conclusion of the procedure included 2 minor intracranial hemorrhages causing headache and resulting in no permanent deficits, 2 mild ischemic strokes, and 3 asymptomatic retroperitoneal hematomas identified by falling hematocrit levels that required no further intervention or treatment. Conclusions The large majority of significant postprocedural events after uncomplicated endovascular aneurysm intervention occur within the first 4 hours; these events become less frequent with increasing time. Transfer to a floor bed after 4-12 hours for further observation is reasonable to consider in some patients.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 08/2014; 121(5):1-8. DOI:10.3171/2014.7.JNS132676 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Diagnosis of carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) relies on clinical findings, such as proptosis, chemosis, and pulsatile tinnitus, plus imaging features including enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). This study reviewed patients with CCF, with a focus on those who were clinically symptomatic but had a normal-appearing SOV on routine scans. Methods: Retrospective review was conducted on the clinical records of patients with CCF seen by ophthalmology or interventional neuroradiology, with attention to clinical and imaging features, angiography findings, management, and outcomes. Results: Forty patients presented with CCF. History of head trauma was present in 13 (average age 43.8 years; all direct or complex), while the remainder occurred spontaneously (average 66 years; 85% indirect). The most common presenting ophthalmologic signs or symptoms were proptosis (65%), binocular diplopia (60%), redness (57.5%), and chemosis (47.5%). After diagnosis, 36 underwent endovascular treatment, with successful occlusion achieved in 90% of cases for whom follow-up data was available (n = 21). Notably, 3 patients with CCF did not have SOV enlargement on any imaging modality including catheter angiography. Conclusions: In this series of patients with clinical signs of CCF, there was no radiologic evidence of enlarged SOV in 26% of patients on noninvasive imaging and in 8% on catheter angiography. To avoid inappropriate interventions or delays in diagnosis and care, it is important to recognize that CCF can exist without SOV enlargement. Patients with clinical features suspicious for CCF should undergo catheter angiography if treatment is being considered. Endovascular treatment can produce clinical improvement or resolution.
    Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 08/2014; 31(3). DOI:10.1097/IOP.0000000000000241 · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Low-profile Visualised Intraluminal Support (LVIS) Device is a novel, braided, intracranial microstent designed for stent-assisted coiling. We present the results of a single-arm, prospective, multicenter trial of the LVIS for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms
    Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery 07/2014; 6 Suppl 1:A2. DOI:10.1136/neurintsurg-2014-011343.4 · 2.77 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

5k Citations
1,187.30 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1993–2015
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Department of Neurosurgery
      • • Department of Medicine
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 2013
    • University of Missouri - St. Louis
      Saint Louis, Michigan, United States
  • 2010
    • Columbia University
      • College of Physicians and Surgeons
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2009
    • American Academy of Neurology
      American Fork, Utah, United States
  • 2007
    • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
      Manhattan, New York, United States
  • 2006–2007
    • Barnes Jewish Hospital
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
    • Washington & Lee University
      Lexington, Virginia, United States
  • 2004
    • Boston Scientific
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2002
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • Department of Radiology
      Chapel Hill, NC, United States
  • 1996–1997
    • University of Wisconsin–Madison
      • Department of Radiology
      Madison, Wisconsin, United States