Celia Briar

Massey University, Palmerston North City, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand

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Publications (6)4.5 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to focus on care workers employed in clients' own homes recognising the skills and responsibilities of home-based care workers. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Interviews and focus groups with domiciliary care workers in New Zealand centred on what these employees actually do during their working day. Findings ‐ Home-based care workers require the same skills as residential care workers, but they also have greater responsibilities and receive less supervision and support, as they work largely in isolation. In addition, they must spend a large part of their working day travelling between clients: this time is unpaid, and brings their average hourly pay below the minimum wage. Practical implications ‐ Although the home-based care workers who took part in this project love and are committed to making a positive difference to their clients, they also want the government, employers and the public to recognise their skills, efforts and their challenging working conditions. Originality/value ‐ In earlier days of deinstitutionalisation, Graham described caring work as a "labour of love". More than three decades years later, a New Zealand government minister described paid care workers as working partly "for love". Care work is also currently perceived as unskilled. Both these perceptions depress the pay and working conditions of care staff, and in future may undermine the quality of care delivered to vulnerable clients.
    European Journal of Marketing 09/2014; 15(3). DOI:10.1108/QAOA-04-2014-0006 · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To document fatigue in New Zealand junior doctors in hospital-based clinical training positions and identify work patterns associated with work/life balance difficulties. This workforce has had a duty limitation of 72 hours/week since 1985. The authors chose a gender-based analytical approach because of the increasing proportion of female medical graduates. The authors mailed a confidential questionnaire to all 2,154 eligible junior doctors in 2003. The 1,412 respondents were working > or = 40 hours/week (complete questionnaires from 1,366: response rate: 63%; 49% women). For each participant, the authors calculated a multidimensional fatigue risk score based on sleep and work patterns. Women were more likely to report never/rarely getting enough sleep (P < .05), never/rarely waking refreshed (P < .001), and excessive sleepiness (P < .05) and were less likely to live with children up to 12 years old (P < .001). Fatigue risk scores differed by specialty but not by gender.Fatigue risk scores in the highest tertile were an independent risk factor for reporting problems in social life (odds ratio: 3.83; 95% CI: 2.79-5.28), home life (3.37; 2.43-4.67), personal relationships (2.12; 1.57-2.86), and other commitments (3.06; 2.23-4.19).Qualitative analyses indicated a common desire among men and women for better work/life balance and for part-time work, particularly in relation to parenthood. Limitation of duty hours alone is insufficient to manage fatigue risk and difficulties in maintaining work/life balance. These findings have implications for schedule design, professional training, and workforce planning.
    Academic medicine: journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 09/2010; 85(9):1526-36. DOI:10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181eabd06 · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Celia Briar
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    ABSTRACT: Mothers' increased entry to paid work has not been equally matched by fathers' extra unpaid work. Managing multiple and conflicting roles is a source of stress for mothers, which can impact negatively on their health and family relationships. Direct assistance provided by some governments (such as subsidised childcare and long paid parental leave) has been found effective in reducing gender inequalities in domestic labour and so also easing mothers' overwork and stress.
    Journal of Feminist Family Therapy 09/2008; 17(3):47-65. DOI:10.1300/J086v17n03_03
  • Martin Tolich, Celia Briar
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a research project in which some of the dynamics of informal gendered task segregation between male and female workers in American supermarkets with the same job description are explored. It also provides a discussion of the implications of this form of gender inequality for equal opportunities policies.
    Gender Work and Organization 12/2002; 6(3):129 - 133. DOI:10.1111/1468-0432.00076 · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    Ee Kheng Ang, Celia Briar, Massey
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    Celia Briar
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    ABSTRACT: The National Advisory Committee on Employment of Women (NACEW) hosted the New Zealand Conference on Pay and Employment Equity for Women, 28–29 June 2004, in Wellington. The purpose of the conference was to lift the debate on pay and employment equity for women in New Zealand and provide an opportunity to think about ways forward. The first day of the conference was focused on scene setting, and the second day on solutions. Pay and employment equity is once again on the political agenda, and the profile of the invited speakers reflected this. Presenters included experts from the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States and Australia, as well as New Zealand's Associate Minister of Labour, Minister of Commerce, Chief Executive of the Department of Labour and Human Rights Commissioner. Around 200 people attended, from the public service, universities, the voluntary sector, independent research agencies and trade unions. The road to employment equity has been long and tortuous, and still the end is not in sight. As Suzanne Snively, the chair of NACEW, pointed out in her opening address, New Zealand women have been campaigning for equal pay since women teachers demanded equal pay in 1893. Women public servants were at last granted equal pay for the same work as men in 1960, and this was extended to women working in the private sector by the Equal Pay Act 1972. However, when clerical workers lodged a claim for equal pay for work of equal value (pay equity) in 1985, the court did not consider it on the ground that the Act's implementation period was over. New Zealand had just ratified the International Labour Organization Conventions No. 100 on Equal Remuneration and No. 111 on Equal Employment Opportunity, and the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discriminations Against Women (CEDAW). So, instead of appealing that decision, the Labour government developed new legislation with improved pay equity provisions. The Employment Equity Act was passed in 1990, and promptly repealed by the incoming National Government later the same year.