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Publications (5)0 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission ended in June 2013 after ten years in orbit. Its FUV and NUV microchannel plate detectors were used to conduct a variety of direct imaging and spectroscopic astronomical surveys with various depths and sky coverage, recording individual photon events with a time resolution of five thousandths of a second. Although the mission has ended, MAST is continuing to provide new data products as the mission transitions to a legacy archive. One product is the GCAT (Seibert et al., in prep), a catalog of GALEX sources across the entire GR6 data release that removes duplicate objects found in the GALEX MCAT. The GCAT defines "primary" NUV and FUV fluxes within the AIS and MIS surveys 40 million and 22 million sources, respectively), accounting for tile overlaps, and with visual inspection of every tile to flag artifacts and conduct other quality control checks. Another catalog of unique sources is that of Bianchi et al. (2013). Similar to the GCAT, their catalog produces a list of distinct GALEX sources in both the FUV and NUV from the AIS and MIS surveys, and includes data from GR7 (through the end of 2012). They have also cross-matched their sources with SDSS DR9, GSC-II, PanSTARRS, and 2MASS. We review access options for these catalogs, including updated matches between the GCAT and SDSS / Kepler available at MAST. In addition to these unique GALEX source catalogs, MAST will provide a database and software package that archives each of the ~1.5 trillion photon events detected over the lifetime of the mission. For the first time, users will be able to create calibrated lightcurves, intensity maps, and animated movies from any set of photons selected across any tile, and with specified aperture sizes, coordinates, and time steps. Users can access the data using either a python-based command-line software package, through a web interface at MAST, or (eventually) through CasJobs using direct SQL queries. We present some example GALEX lightcurves and images using this new data product to highlight just some of the possibilities available for users to mine the GALEX photon database, particularly with variable sources.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the use of MIR PAH bands, continuum and emission lines as probes of star-formation and AGN activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z~0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey (SSGSS) which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the UV to the FIR and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT (Smith et al. 2007), a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths up to ~30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low metallicity galaxies or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum and emission line properties and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties such as age, metallicity and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH equivalent widths and [Ne II]12.8micrometers/[O IV]25.9micrometers line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical star-formation/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines, are found to be tightly correlated to the total IR luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the total IR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in Halpha lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust corrected, Halpha derived star-formation rates. Comment: Accepted for publication in ApJ
    06/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We describe HST imaging of recent star formation complexes located in the extended UV disk (XUV-disk) component of NGC 5236 (M 83), NGC 5055 (M 63), and NGC 2090. Photometry in four FUV--visible bands permits us to constrain the type of resolved stars and effective age of clusters, in addition to extinction. The preliminary results given herein focus on CMD analysis and clustering properties in this unique star-forming environment.
    01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Far-infrared (FIR), ultraviolet (UV), and soft X-ray observations are easily degraded by dust and gas between the source and the telescope. They must be made from space, where they are still affected by the interstellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy. Fortunately the ISM is quite patchy, with several ``cosmic windows'' covering ˜ 100 deg2 of sky having exceptionally low interstellar extinction and cirrus emission. Since the universe is nearly isotropic, these windows contain representative samples of cosmologically distant sources and will be the targets of deep multiwavelength studies including SWIRE, GALEX/DIS, and XMM-LSS. Overlapping optical and radio surveys provide essential source identifications, redshifts, morphologies, and continuum spectra. The prototype VLA survey (see http://www.cv.nrao.edu/sirtf) covers the 5 deg2 SIRTF First-Look Survey (FLS) and is being used to identify the expected FIR sources in advance. Most will be star-forming galaxies obeying the very tight far-infrared/radio correlation and thus continuum radio sources stronger than S ≈ 100 μJy at 1.4 GHz. Proposed VLA surveys covering the remaining ``cosmic windows'' will be useful for studying the evolution of obscured AGNs, clusters, and other uncommon objects.
    Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the spectrographic evidence for wind-driven mass loss from erupting dwarf novae, almost no visible shells surrounding these systems have ever been detected. Theory predicts that the white dwarfs in all dwarf novae must eventually accrete enough mass to undergo classical nova eruptions, but not a single dwarf nova has ever been shown to have undergone a classical nova eruption. Here we report observations that show a huge gas shell around a nearby prototypical dwarf nova. The shell is an order of magnitude more extended than any ever detected around any classical nova. The derived shell mass matches that of classical novae, and is inconsistent with the mass expected from a steady dwarf nova wind.
    12/2004;