Clare L. Weber

Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

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Publications (7)23.57 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study examined cycling economy before and after 8 wk of maximal leg-strength training. Seven previously untrained males (25 +/- 2 yr) performed leg-strength training 3 d.wk(-1) for 8 wk using four sets of five repetitions at 85% of one repetition maximum (1RM). Body mass, lean-leg muscle mass (LLM), percentage of body fat, and leg strength (1RM) were measured at 0, 4, and 8 wk of training. Cycling economy was calculated as the deltaVO2/deltaWR (change in the O2 cost of exercise divided by the change in the power between two different power outputs). There were significant increases in LLM and 1RM from 0 to 4 wk of training (LLM: 25.8 +/- 0.7 to 27.2 +/- 0.8 kg; 1RM: 138 +/- 9 to 215 +/- 9 kg). From 4 to 8 wk of training, 1RM continued to increase significantly (215 +/- 9 to 266 +/- 8 kg) with no further change observed in LLM. Peak power during incremental cycling increased significantly (305 +/- 14 to 315 +/- 16 W), whereas the power output achieved at the gas-exchange threshold (GET) remained unchanged. Peak O2 uptake and the O2 uptake achieved at the GET also remained unchanged following training. Cycling economy improved significantly when the power output was increased from below the GET to above the GET but not for power outputs below the GET. Maximal leg-strength training improves cycling economy in previously untrained subjects. Increases in leg strength during the final 4 wk of training with unchanged LLM suggest that neural adaptations were present.
    Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 08/2005; 37(7):1231-6. · 4.46 Impact Factor
  • Clare L Weber, Donald A Schneider
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    ABSTRACT: Gender differences in maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) were examined before and after 4 and 8 wk of high-intensity interval training. Untrained men (n = 7) and women (n = 7) cycled at 120% of pretraining peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) to exhaustion (MAOD test) pre-, mid-, and posttraining. A posttraining timed test was also completed at the MAOD test power output, but this test was stopped at the time to exhaustion achieved during the pretraining MAOD test. The 14.3 +/- 5.2% increase in MAOD observed in men after 4 wk of training was not different from the 14.0 +/- 3.0% increase seen in women (P > 0.05). MAOD increased by a further 6.6 +/- 1.9% in men, and this change was not different from the additional 5.1 +/- 2.3% increase observed in women after the final 4 wk of training. VO2 peak measured during incremental cycling increased significantly (P < 0.01) in male but not in female subjects after 8 wk of training. Moreover, the accumulated oxygen (AO2) uptake was higher in men during the posttraining timed test compared with the pretraining MAOD test (P < 0.01). In contrast, the AO2 uptake was unchanged from pre- to posttraining in female subjects. The increase in MAOD with training was not different between men and women, suggesting an enhanced ability to produce ATP anaerobically in both groups. However, the increase in VO2 peak and AO2 uptake obtained in male subjects after training indicates improved oxidative metabolism in men but not in women. We conclude that there are basic gender differences that may predispose men and women to specific metabolic adaptations after a period of intense interval training.
    Journal of Applied Physiology 05/2002; 92(5):1795-801. DOI:10.1152/japplphysiol.00546.2001 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    Clare L. Weber, Donald A. Schneider
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability of maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) measured at 110% and 120% of peak oxygen uptake (VO2) for cycling in seven untrained male and seven untrained female subjects. After one familiarization trial, all subjects performed two MAOD tests at a power output corresponding to 110% and two tests at 120% of VO2peak in random order. MAOD was calculated for each subject as the difference between O2 demand during exercise and the measured VO2. The mean (+/-SEM) time to exhaustion for the group was not significantly different between trial 1 (226 +/- 13 s) and trial 2 (223 +/- 14 s) of the 110% test. Likewise, the difference in the time to exhaustion between trial 1 (158 +/- 11 s) and trial 2 (159 +/- 10 s) was not significant for the 120% test. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the time to exhaustion were 0.95 for the 110% test and 0.98 for the 120% test. The mean MAOD value obtained in trial 1 (2.62 +/- 0.17 L) was not significantly different from the mean value obtained in trial 2 (2.54 +/- 0.19 L) for the 110% test. Additionally, the mean values for the two trials did not differ significantly for MAOD (2.64 +/- 0.21 L for trial 1 and 2.63 +/- 0.19 L for trial 2) in the 120% test. The intraclass correlation coefficients for MAOD were 0.95 for the 110% test and 0.97 for the 120% test. All intraclass correlation coefficients were significant at P < 0.001. When conducted under standardized conditions, the determination of MAOD for cycling was highly repeatable at both 110% and 120% of VO2peak in untrained male and female subjects.
    Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 06/2001; 33(6):1056-9. DOI:10.1097/00005768-200106000-00028 · 4.46 Impact Factor
  • Clare L. Weber, Donald A. Schneider
    Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 01/2001; 33(10):1795. DOI:10.1097/00005768-200110000-00029 · 4.46 Impact Factor
  • Clare L. Weber, Donald A. Schneider
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present study was to determine if gender differences exist in the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) or in the blood lactate (Lac-) and catecholamine responses to the MAOD test (120% peak oxygen uptake to exhaustion). The MAOD for cycling was measured in ten untrained male and ten untrained female subjects using the method described by Medbø et al. (Anaerobic capacity determined by maximal accumulated oxygen deficit. J Appl Physiol 64: 50-60, 1988). Blood Lac- and catecholamine concentrations were measured at rest, exhaustion and for 30 min following the MAOD test. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure lean body mass (LBM) and to estimate the active muscle mass (AMM) for cycling. Males achieved a significantly higher MAOD than females following correction for AMM [126.3 (5.6) versus 108.3 (6.1) ml x kg AMM(-1), P = 0.04]. The peak blood lactate concentration ([Lac-]) in males [13.6 (0.9) mmol x l(-1)] was significantly higher than in females [10.0 (1.0) mmol x l(-1)]. Males obtained a 68% higher peak epinephrine concentration ([Epi]) than females, but the difference was not significant [1268 (188) pg x ml(-1) versus 755 (179) pg x ml(-1), P = 0.066]. However, plasma [Epi] was significantly higher for males than females at 1 min [824 (116) versus 489 (116) pg x ml(-1), P = 0.036] and 3 min [330 (52) versus 179 (42) pg x ml(-1), P = 0.039] into the recovery period. No gender-dependent differences in the norepinephrine concentration were observed at any time. Peak [Lac-] was significantly correlated with MAOD (ml x kg AMM(-1)) in females (r = 0.75), but not in males (r = 0.09). The peak plasma [Epi] was not significantly correlated with MAOD (ml x kg AMM(-1)) or peak [Lac-] in either group. These findings suggest that there are gender-dependent differences in MAOD even when expressed relative to the AMM for cycling. The higher blood [Lac-] in males compared to females obtained after supramaximal exercise was not caused by enhanced secretion of Epi. The greater MAOD in untrained males was not caused by a greater ability to produce Lac- or by enhanced secretion of Epi.
    Arbeitsphysiologie 08/2000; 82(4):255-61. DOI:10.1007/s004210000214 · 2.30 Impact Factor
  • D. A. Schneider, C. L. Weber
    Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 01/1999; 31. DOI:10.1097/00005768-199905001-01297 · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    Clare L. Weber, Donald A. Schneider