Bunichiro Ogawa

Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (5)15.09 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We have recently shown that maternal exposure to acrylamide (AA) impaired neurogenesis in rat offspring measured by the increase in interneurons producing reelin, a molecule regulating migration and correct positioning of developing neurons, in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. To clarify the cellular target of AA on hippocampal neurogenesis and its reversibility after maternal exposure, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given drinking water containing AA at 0, 4, 20, 100 ppm on day 10 of pregnancy through day 21 after delivery on weaning. Male offspring were examined immunohistochemically on postnatal day (PND) 21 and PND 77. For comparison, male pups of direct AA-injection control during lactation (50 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week) were also examined. On PND 21, maternal AA-exposure decreased progenitor cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) from 20 ppm accompanied with increased density of reelin-producing interneurons and NeuN-expressing mature neurons within the hilus at 100 ppm, similar to the direct AA-injection control. In the SGZ examined at 100 ppm, cellular populations immunoexpressing doublecortin or dihydropyrimidinase-like 3, suggesting postmitotic immature granule cells, were decreased. On PND 77, the SGZ cell proliferation and reelin-producing interneuron density recovered, while the hilar mature neurons sustained to increase from 20 ppm, similar to the direct AA-injection control. Thus, developmental exposure to AA reversibly affects hippocampal neurogenesis targeting the proliferation of type-3 progenitor cells resulting in a decrease in immature granule cells in rats. A sustained increase in hilar mature neurons could be the signature of the developmental effect of AA.
    Archives of Toxicology 01/2012; 86(5):779-90. · 5.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A perianal subcutaneous tumor involving the anal sac developed in an 8-year-old male mixed Labrador Retriever dog. Histologically, this tumor showed typical features of the solid-type carcinoma of the apocrine glands of the anal sac. However, neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for cytokeratin 8, chromogranin A, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuron-specific enolase, and synaptophysin, and negative for S-100 protein, α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, glucagon, insulin, somatostatin, carcinoembryonic antigen, serotonin, and parathyroid hormone-related protein. Considering the distribution of chromogranin A-positive cells within the anal sac apocrine glands, this tumor was diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma originating from the apocrine glands of the anal sac.
    Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation: official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc 07/2011; 23(4):852-6. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine whether developmental exposure to acrylamide (AA) impairs neuronal development, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with AA at 0, 25, 50 or 100 ppm in drinking water from gestational day 6 until weaning on postnatal day 21. Offspring were immunohistochemically examined at the end of exposure. We investigated the expression of Reelin (a molecule regulating neuronal migration and positioning) in the hilus of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. As a positive control for direct exposure, AA (50 mg/kg body weight) was administered to pups by intraperitoneal injection 3 times per week during the lactation period. As well as pups directly injected with AA, maternally exposed offspring decreased body weight at 100 ppm; increased dose-dependently the number of Reelin-immunoreactive cells (from 25 ppm AA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67-immunoreactive cells (from 50 ppm AA), confirming an increase in γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic interneurons. We also noted decreased apoptosis in the neuroblast-producing subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of maternally exposed pups at 100 ppm, as well as in directly AA-injected pups. These results suggest that a compensatory regulatory mechanism exists to correct impaired neurogenesis and mismigration caused by maternal exposure to AA during neuronal development. The lowest-observed-adverse-effect level of AA was determined to be 25 ppm (3.72 mg/kg body weight/day).
    Archives of Toxicology 12/2010; 85(8):987-94. · 5.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Reelin signaling plays a role in neuronal migration and positioning during brain development. To clarify the effect of systemic growth retardation on the distribution of Reelin-expressing interneurons in the hilus of the hippocampal dentate gyrus, pregnant rats were fed a synthetic diet with either a normal (20% casein) or low (10% casein) protein concentration from gestational day 10 to postnatal day (PND) 21 at weaning. Male offspring were immunohistochemically examined at PND 21 and on PND 77. Protein-restricted offspring displayed systemic growth retardation through PND 77 and had decreased absolute brain weights and an increased number of external granular cells in the cerebellar cortex, suggestive of retarded brain growth at weaning. However, maternal protein restriction did not change the cellular distribution of immunoreactivity for Reelin, Calbindin-D-28K, or glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 or of NeuN-positive postmitotic neurons in the dentate hilus either at PND 21 or PND 77, which suggests that the population of γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic interneurons involving synthesis of Reelin was not affected. Furthermore, as well as the distribution of hilar neurons expressing neurogenesis-related FoxG1, cell proliferation and apoptosis in the subgranular zone were unaffected through PND 77. These results suggest that systemic growth retardation caused by maternal protein restriction does not affect neuronal migration and postnatal neurogenesis of the dentate gyrus resulting in unaltered distribution of Reelin-synthesizing interneurons.
    Reproductive Toxicology 10/2010; 30(4):591-9. · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this report, we describe a case of neuroendocrine carcinoma of undetermined origin in a dog. Necropsy revealed scattered small neoplastic nodules in the bilateral lungs and a small nodule in the parapancreatic lymph node. Histopathologically, both pulmonary and lymph nodal nodules showed a similar histologic pattern, with neoplastic cells being arranged in diffusely proliferating sheet-like cellular nests separated by variable amounts of fibrous septa, sometimes forming rosettes and duct-like structures. Scattered small necrotic foci and invasion to fibrous septa were typically observed. Neoplastic cells showed round to oval-shaped nuclei with prominent nucleoli and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm that were positive for Grimelius' silver impregnation staining and immunostaining with cytokeratin, synaptophysin, vasoactive intestinal peptide and chromogranin A, indicative of the development of a neuroendocrine carcinoma. However, judging from the distribution of tumors lacking the portion suggestive of the primary site in any organ examined, as well as no further indication of differentiation potential of neoplastic cells, this tumor has so far been diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma of undetermined origin.
    Journal of Toxicologic Pathology 09/2010; 23(3):151-5. · 0.34 Impact Factor