U Herzberg

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States

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Publications (23)85.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition of the somatosensory system caused by pathology of the nervous system. Current drugs treat symptoms but largely fail to target the underlying mechanisms responsible for the pathological changes seen in the central or peripheral nervous system. We investigated the therapeutic effects of PDA-001, a culture expanded placenta-derived adherent cell, in the rat neuritis model. Pain is induced in the model by applying carrageenan to the sciatic nerve trunk, causing perineural inflammation of the sciatic nerve. PDA-001, at doses ranging from 0.4x10(6) to 4x10(6) cells/animal, or vehicle control was intravenously administrated to assess the biological activity of the cells. A dose-dependent effect of PDA-001 on pain relief was demonstrated. PDA-001 at doses of 1x10(6) and 4x10(6), but not 0.4x10(6), reduced mechanical hyperalgesia within 24 hours following treatment and through day 8 after induction of neuritis. The mechanism underlying PDA-001-mediated reduction of neuroinflammatory pain was also explored. Ex vivo tissue analyses demonstrated that PDA-001 suppressed homing, maturation and differentiation of dendritic cells, thus inhibiting T-cell priming and activation in draining lymph nodes. PDA-001 also reduced interferon gamma and IL-17 in draining lymph nodes and in the ispilateral sciatic nerve, and increased the levels of IL-10 in draining lymph nodes and plasma, pointing to T-cell modulation as a possible mechanism mediating the observed anti-hyperalgesic effects. Furthermore, in the ipsilateral sciatic nerve, significantly less leukocyte infiltration was observed in PDA-001-treated animals. The results suggest that PDA-001may provide a novel therapeutic approach in the management of inflammatory neuropathic pain and similar conditions.
    Brain Behavior and Immunity 10/2012; · 5.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammation along a nerve trunk (perineural inflammation), without detectable axonal damage, has been shown to induce transient pain in the organ supplied by the nerve. The aims of the present study were to study the role IL-6 and IL-1beta, in pain induced by perineural inflammation. IL-6 and IL-1beta secretion from rat's sciatic nerves, L-5 Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG), and the hind paw skin, 3 and 8 days following exposure of the nerve to Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA), were measured using ELISA method. Hind paw tactile-allodynia, mechano-hyperalgesia, heat-allodynia and electrical detection thresholds were tested up to 8 days following the application of CFA, IL-6 or IL-1beta adjacent to the sciatic nerve trunk. Employing electrophysiological recording, saphenous nerve spontaneous activity, nerve trunk mechano-sensitivity and paw tactile detection threshold (determined by recording action potential induced by the lowest mechanical stimulus) were assessed 3 and 8 days following exposure of the nerve trunk to CFA, IL-6, or IL-1beta. IL-6 and IL-1beta secretion from the nerve was significantly elevated on the 3rd day post-operation (DPO). On the 8th DPO, IL-6 levels returned to baseline while IL-1beta levels remained significantly elevated. The DRG cytokine's level was increased on the 3rd and 8th DPOs, contralateral cytokine's level was increased on the 3rd DPO. The skin IL-6 level was increased bilaterally on the 3rd DPO and returned to baseline on the 8th DPO. IL-1beta levels increased in the affected side on the 3rd and bilaterally on the 8th DPO. Direct application of IL-6 or CFA on the sciatic nerve induced significant hind paw tactile-allodynia from the 1st to 5th DPOs, reduced electrical detection threshold from the 1st to 3rd DPOs, mechano-hyperalgesia from 3rd to 5th DPOs and heat-allodynia on the 3rd DPO. Direct application of IL-1beta induced paw tactile and heat-allodynia on the 7-8th DPOs and mechano-hyperalgesia on the 5-8th DPOs. Perineural inflammation significantly increased spontaneous activity myelinated fibres 3 and 8 days following the application. Direct application of IL-6 induced elevation of spontaneous activity on the 3rd while IL-1beta on the 8th DPO. Nerve mechano-sensitivity was significantly increased on the 3rd day following exposure to CFA and IL-6 and on the 8th following CFA application. The rat's paw lowest mechanical force necessary for induction of action potential, was significantly reduced 3 days following CFA application. IL-6 and IL-1beta play an important role in pain induced by perineural inflammation. IL-6 activity is more prominent immediately following application (2-5th DPOs), while IL-1beta, activity is more significant in a later stage (5-8th DPOs).
    Brain Behavior and Immunity 02/2009; 23(4):474-84. · 5.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present simple method to assess dental pain in the awake rat. Using a sensitive strain gauge we examined changes in bite strength and bite pattern in rats following dental injury. Rats with dental injury displayed a significant reduction in mean peak bite strength and an altered bite cluster pattern. Both changes in the dental injury rats were reversed by an analgesic dose of morphine, and this could be reversed with naloxone. These changes were not observed in naive control animals. This simple method significantly improves our ability to evaluate dental pain syndromes.
    Neuroscience Letters 11/2008; 447(2-3):175-8. · 2.03 Impact Factor
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    Uri Herzberg, Aldric Hama, Jacqueline Sagen
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have demonstrated that adrenal medullary chromaffin cells transplanted into the spinal subarachnoid space significantly reduced pain-related behavior following hind paw plantar formalin injection in rats. The data suggests a centrally mediated antinociceptive mechanism. The spinal transplants may have effects on sciatic nerve function as well. To address this, the current study examined the effects of spinal adrenal transplants on hind paw edema and the anterograde transport of substance P (SP) that occur following formalin injection. Robust formalin-evoked edema, as well as hind paw flinching, was observed in striated muscle control-transplanted rats, which were not observed in adrenal-transplanted rats. To visualize transport of SP, the sciatic nerve was ligated ipsilateral to formalin injection and the nerve was processed 48 h later for immunocytochemistry. A significant formalin-induced accumulation of SP immunoreactivity (IR) was observed proximal to the ligation in control-transplanted rats. In contrast, there was significantly less SP IR observed from nerve of adrenal-transplanted rats, suggesting a diminution of anterograde axoplasmic transport by adrenal transplants. The change in SP IR may have been due to an alteration of transport due to formalin injection, thus, transport was visualized by the accumulation of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) at the ligation site. Formalin injection did not significantly increase proximal accumulation of GAP43 IR, indicating that formalin does not increase anterograde transport. Surprisingly, however, adrenal transplants significantly diminished GAP43 IR accumulation compared to control-transplanted rats. These data demonstrate that spinal adrenal transplants can attenuate the formalin-evoked response by modulating primary afferent responses.
    Brain Research 04/2008; 1198:85-92. · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • European journal of pain (London, England) 01/2006; 10. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have indicated that adrenal medullary chromaffin cells transplanted into the spinal subarachnoid space can alleviate pain behaviors in several animal models. The goal of this study was to assess whether decreased activation of spinal dorsal horn neurons responsive to nociceptive stimuli may contribute to these antinociceptive effects. In order to address this, expression of neural activity marker c-fos in response to intraplantar formalin was evaluated in animals with intrathecal adrenal medullary or control striated muscle transplants. Adrenal medullary transplants significantly attenuated formalin-induced flinching behaviors in both acute and tonic phases of the formalin response, in comparison with control transplanted animals. Fos-like-immunoreactive (Fos-LI) cell numbers were markedly reduced in the dorsal horns of animals with adrenal medullary transplants in comparison to robust Fos-LI expression in control transplanted animals. This reduction was observed in both superficial and deep laminae of the dorsal horn, but the magnitude of the decrease was greatest in lamina V. Similar to reports using other antinociceptive treatments, some residual c-fos expression was observed, particularly in laminae I-II, in animals with adrenal medullary transplants. The results of these studies suggest that adrenal medullary transplants produce antinociception in part by inhibiting spinal dorsal horn neuronal activation in response to noxious stimuli.
    Brain Research 08/2002; 944(1-2):174-83. · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • U Herzberg, J Sagen
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    ABSTRACT: Painful sensory neuropathy is a common and debilitating consequence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The underlying causes of neuropathic pain are most likely not due to direct infection of the nervous system by active virus. The goal of this study was to determine whether epineural exposure to the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 could lead to chronic painful peripheral neuropathy. Two doses of gp120 or BSA control were transiently delivered epineurally via oxidized cellulose wrapped around the rat sciatic nerve. Animals were assessed for neuropathic pain behaviors at several intervals from 1-30 days following nerve surgery. Allodynia and hyperalgesia were observed within 1-3 days following gp120 and sustained throughout the testing period. The gp120-exposed sciatic nerve exhibited early but transient pathology, notably axonal swelling and increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) within the nerve trunk. In contrast, intense astrocytic and microglial activation was observed in the spinal cord, and this gliosis persisted for at least 30 days following epineural gp120, in parallel with neuropathic pain behaviors. These findings demonstrate that limited peripheral nerve exposure to HIV protein can induce persistent painful sensory neuropathy that may be sustained and magnified by long-term spinal neuropathology.
    Journal of Neuroimmunology 06/2001; 116(1):29-39. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    G Yadid, A Zangen, U Herzberg, R Nakash, J Sagen
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    ABSTRACT: While transplants of adrenal medullary cells into the spinal subarachnoid space may produce antinociception via inhibition of spinal pain transmission pathways, alterations at higher central nervous system (CNS) centers have not been addressed. Recent findings suggest that prolonged noxious stimulation results in release of endogenous beta-endorphin in the brain, possibly as a compensatory mechanism to reduce nociception. The goal of this study was to determine whether adrenal medullary transplants in the spinal subarachnoid space alter endogenous beta-endorphin secretion in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, its principal CNS source. Pain behaviors and arcuate beta-endorphin secretion by microdialysis were monitored during the formalin pain test in animals with spinal adrenal medullary or control transplants. Basal levels of extracellular beta-endorphin were 3-fold higher in adrenal medullary-implanted than in controls. In control animals, formalin induced robust pain behaviors and a marked transient increase in beta-endorphin release 30-60 min following injection. In contrast, pain behaviors were attenuated and the formalin-induced increase in beta-endorphin was completely blocked in adrenal medullary implanted animals. Findings from these studies indicate that adrenal medullary transplants in the spinal subarachnoid space can alter beta-endorphin release in the arcuate nucleus both basally and in response to noxious stimuli. Thus, spinally placed adrenal medullary transplants not only alter local spinal cord pharmacology, but can alter endogenous neurochemistry at higher pain processing centers as well.
    Neuropsychopharmacology 01/2001; 23(6):709-16. · 8.68 Impact Factor
  • E Eliav, U Herzberg, M A Ruda, G J Bennett
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    ABSTRACT: Painful peripheral neuropathies involve both axonal damage and an inflammation of the nerve. The role of the latter by itself was investigated by producing an experimental neuritis in the rat. The sciatic nerves were exposed at mid-thigh level and wrapped loosely in hemostatic oxidized cellulose (Oxycel) that on one side was saturated with an inflammatory stimulus, carrageenan (CARRA) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and on the other side saturated with saline. In other rats, a myositis was created by implanting Oxycel saturated with CFA into a pocket made in the biceps femoris at a position adjacent to where the nerve was treated. Pain-evoked responses from the plantar hind paws were tested before treatment and daily thereafter. Statistically significant heat- and mechano-hyperalgesia, and mechano- and cold-allodynia were present on the side of the inflamed nerve (CARRA or CFA) for 1-5 days after which responses returned to normal. There were no abnormal pain responses on the side of the saline-treated nerve, and none in the rats with the experimental myositis. The abnormal pain responses were inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockade with MK-801, but were relatively resistant to the dose of morphine tested (10 mg/kg). Light microscopic examination of CARRA-treated nerves, harvested at the time of peak symptom severity, revealed that the treated region was mildly edematous and that there was an obvious endoneurial infiltration of immune cells (granulocytes and lymphocytes). There was either a complete absence of degeneration, or the degeneration of no more than a few tens of axons. Immunocytochemical staining for CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocyte markers revealed that both cell types were present in the epineurial and endoneurial compartments. The endoneurial T-cells appeared to derive from the endoneurial vasculature, rather than from migration across the nerve sheath. We conclude that a focal inflammation of the sciatic nerve produces neuropathic pain sensations in a distant region (the ipsilateral hind paw) and that this is not due to axonal damage. The neuropathic pain is specific to inflammation of the nerve because it was absent in animals with the experimental myositis and in those receiving sham-treatment. These results suggest that an acute episode of neuritis-evoked neuropathic pain may contribute to the genesis of chronically painful peripheral neuropathies, and that a chronic (or chronically recurrent) focal neuritis might produce neuropathic pain in the absence of significant (or clinically detectable) structural damage to the nerve. The model that we describe is likely to be useful in the study of the neuroimmune factors that contribute to painful peripheral neuropathies.
    Pain 12/1999; 83(2):169-82. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • E Eliav, U Herzberg, R M Caudle
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    ABSTRACT: Previous work demonstrated that, in rats, intrathecal GR89696, a putative kappa-2 opioid receptor agonist, inhibited hyperalgesia to noxious heat in an inflamed hind paw (anti-hyperalgesic effect). Non-inflamed paws were not influenced by kappa-2 receptor activation. The question addressed in this study was whether GR89696 was as effective in blocking hyperalgesia and allodynia in nerve injury models as it was in the inflammation model. GR89696 (6 nmoles, i.t.) completely reversed the hyperalgesia and allodynia observed in both the neuropathy and neuritis models in all sensory tests. However, it did not alter sensory function in non-injured limbs nor in sham operated animals. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the anti-hyperalgesic and anti-allodynic effects of GR89696. The mu agonist DAMGO (6 nmoles, i.t.) and the kappa-1 agonist U69593 (100 nmoles, i.t.) only partially reversed hyperalgesia and allodynia. These findings suggest that kappa-2 opioid receptors may be a useful target for the pharmacological control of hyperalgesia and allodynia.
    Pain 03/1999; 79(2-3):255-64. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • A T Hama, J B Siegan, U Herzberg, J Sagen
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    ABSTRACT: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation is thought to initiate a cellular cascade of events in the spinal cord that leads to neuronal hyperactivation and exaggerated persistent pain behaviors. Previous studies have demonstrated that implantation of adrenal medullary tissue into the spinal subarachnoid space reduces abnormal pain behaviors such as hyperalgesia and allodynia, possibly by intervening in the NMDA hyperexcitability cascade. Histogranin is a 15-amino acid peptide possessing NMDA receptor antagonist activity that has been isolated from adrenal medullary tissue. The present study examined the ability of stable analog [Ser1]histogranin to reduce abnormal pain-related behaviors induced in rats by direct activation of spinal NMDA receptors. The intrathecal injection of NMDA (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 nmol) produced significant thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia in a dose-related fashion. [Ser1]histogranin injected intrathecally prior to NMDA injections dose dependently attenuated or completely blocked hyperalgesia and allodynia. In addition, [Ser1]histogranin administration following NMDA-induction of abnormal pain behaviors reversed these effects. These results demonstrate that a naturally derived adrenal medullary neuropeptide can prevent and reverse NMDA-mediated spinal hyperexcitability. The distinct profile and robust activity of [Ser1]histogranin suggest novel alternative approaches in the management of pain and other CNS disorders involving abnormal excitatory neurotransmission.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 02/1999; 62(1):67-74. · 2.61 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation is thought to initiate a cellular cascade of events in the spinal cord that leads to neuronal hyperactivation and exaggerated persistent pain behaviors. Previous studies have demonstrated that implantation of adrenal medullary tissue into the spinal subarachnoid space reduces abnormal pain behaviors such as hyperalgesia and allodynia, possibly by intervening in the NMDA hyperexcitability cascade. Histogranin is a 15-amino acid peptide possessing NMDA receptor antagonist activity that has been isolated from adrenal medullary tissue. The present study examined the ability of stable analog [Ser1]histogranin to reduce abnormal pain-related behaviors induced in rats by direct activation of spinal NMDA receptors. The intrathecal injection of NMDA (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 nmol) produced significant thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia in a dose-related fashion. [Ser1]histogranin injected intrathecally prior to NMDA injections dose dependently attenuated or completely blocked hyperalgesia and allodynia. In addition, [Ser1]histogranin administration following NMDA-induction of abnormal pain behaviors reversed these effects. These results demonstrate that a naturally derived adrenal medullary neuropeptide can prevent and reverse NMDA-mediated spinal hyperexcitability. The distinct profile and robust activity of [Ser1]histogranin suggest novel alternative approaches in the management of pain and other CNS disorders involving abnormal excitatory neurotransmission.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior - PHARMACOL BIOCHEM BEHAV. 01/1999; 62(1):67-74.
  • Eli Eliav, Uri Herzberg, Robert M Caudle
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    ABSTRACT: Previous work demonstrated that, in rats, intrathecal GR89 696, a putative kappa-2 opioid receptor agonist, inhibited hyperalgesia to noxious heat in an inflamed hind paw (anti-hyperalgesic effect). Non-inflamed paws were not influenced by kappa-2 receptor activation. The question addressed in this study was whether GR89 696 was as effective in blocking hyperalgesia and allodynia in nerve injury models as it was in the inflammation model. GR89 696 (6 nmoles, i.t.) completely reversed the hyperalgesia and allodynia observed in both the neuropathy and neuritis models in all sensory tests. However, it did not alter sensory function in non-injured limbs nor in sham operated animals. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the anti-hyperalgesic and anti-allodynic effects of GR89 696. The mu agonist DAMGO (6 nmoles, i.t.) and the kappa-1 agonist U69 593 (100 nmoles, i.t.) only partially reversed hyperalgesia and allodynia. These findings suggest that kappa-2 opioid receptors may be a useful target for the pharmacological control of hyperalgesia and allodynia.
    Pain 01/1999; 79(2):255-264. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • Pain 01/1999; 83(2). · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • A Zangen, U Herzberg, Z Vogel, G Yadid
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    ABSTRACT: The hypothesis that the naturally occurring analgesic peptide, beta-endorphin, is released in the brain in response to pain had never been directly validated. In this study, we applied a brain microdialysis method for monitoring beta-endorphin release in vivo, to test this hypothesis in the brains of conscious, freely moving rats. Herein we first show that endogenous beta-endorphin can be measured in vivo in the brain under physiological conditions. Upon induction of a nociceptive stimulus by injection of formalin into the hind-paws of rats, the extracellular levels of beta-endorphin in their arcuate nucleus increased by 88%, corresponding to their nociceptive response. This direct evidence for the release of endogenous beta-endorphin in the brain in response to nociceptive stimulus indicates a possible mechanism for organisms to cope with pain.
    Neuroscience 09/1998; 85(3):659-62. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The potential of a novel therapeutic approach for treating Parkinson's disease, which involves the transplantation of a transfected human astrocyte cell line SVG-TH, that stably expresses the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine production, tyrosine hydroxylase, was examined. SVG-TH and untransfected parent cells were grafted into the diseased striatum of rats in which Parkinson's disease had been induced by the administration of 6-hydroxydopamine. The in situ production and spillover of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (the precursor of dopamine), dopamine and their metabolites in the striatal extracellular fluid of the grafted rats was determined in conscious animals using the microdialysis technique and a high pressure liquid chromatography apparatus. Alleviation of symptoms of Parkinson's disease (abnormal movements) was evaluated by rotation tests. Upon transplantation of the SVG-TH cells into the striatum of the parkinsonian rats, the levels of dopamine in extracellular fluid of the striatum reached those of the normal rats, and correlated well with the improvement (74%) in their rotating behaviour (behavioural deficit). The levels of the two main dopamine metabolites, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, were low in the lesioned rats, even after SVG-TH transplantation. An alternative route of metabolism of dopamine may occur in the transplanted striatum, since the dopamine metabolite, 3-O-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylethylamine, appeared, which indicates activity of catechol-O-methyl transferase. Upon blockade of L-aromatic-amino acid decarboxylase, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine accumulated in extracellular fluid of the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned and SVG-TH-grafted rats, which indicated that these cells produced active tyrosine hydroxylase in vivo. These findings indicate the potential of treating Parkinson's disease by the intrabrain grafting of human astrocyte cells transfected with the rate limiting enzyme for dopamine production.
    Neuroscience 08/1998; 85(2):405-13. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the rat sciatic nerve, which within 3 days induces thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, is used as a model for pain resulting from nerve injury. Involvement of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the development of this hyperalgesia is suggested by the increase in the level of mRNA encoding NGF in cells in the injured area and in dorsal root ganglia at the level of the lesion and the greatly increased NGF levels (determined by ELISA) in the ganglia ipsilateral to the CCI. Application of anti-serum to NGF at the site of CCI delayed the appearance of hyperalgesia, whereas pre-immune serum appeared to enhance it. These results are consistent with the view that NGF is an important factor in the appearance of hyperalgesia associated with unilateral mononeuropathy.
    Neuroreport 06/1997; 8(7):1613-8. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    U Herzberg, E Eliav, G J Bennett, I J Kopin
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of a high affinity cannabinoid receptor agonist were evaluated in rats subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve (CCI) or a sham operation. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the active, but not the inactive enantiomer, alleviated the pain behavior exhibited by CCI animals in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, at doses ranging from 0.43 to 4.3 mg/kg effects on sensitivity to a heat stimulus were observed neither in the paw contralateral to the sciatic ligation, nor in animals subjected to sham surgery. Animals subjected to CCI and treated with 4.3 mg/kg exhibited hypoalgesia in the paw ipsilateral to the ligated sciatic, i.e. heat hypoalgesia was completely reversed. The hypoalgesia is presumed to be the results of unmasking of a sensory deficit reflecting the known loss of C and A delta with CCI. Although side effects were present in some CCI animals subjected to the high dose (4.3 mg/kg), a moderate dose (2.14 mg/kg) completely alleviated the thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia, and mechanical allodynia without side effects. In addition to identifying a potential drug treatment for painful neuropathy, this study suggests that changes in cannabinoid receptors occurs in nerve injured animals.
    Neuroscience Letters 02/1997; 221(2-3):157-60. · 2.03 Impact Factor
  • A. Zangen, U. Herzberg, Z. Vogel, G. Yadid
    Neuroscience Letters - NEUROSCI LETT. 01/1997; 237.
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    ABSTRACT: An animal model or peripheral mononeuropathy was utilized in the present study to investigate the potential role of substance P (SP) in modifying immune responses associated with chronic pain conditions. Animals subjected to unilateral sciatic ligation and sham-operated animals were sensitized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and subsequently challenged in the ipsilateral or contralateral hind paw to produce a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. Subcutaneous microdialysis and radioimmunoassay were used to measure interstitial fluid SP levels in the challenged tissue prior to and following immune challenge in control and neuropathic animals. Following immune challenge, there was a significant increase in the concentration of SP in tissue dialysate samples from the challenged paw of both sham-operated and neuropathic animals. However, tissue SP levels in neuropathic animals were more than two-fold higher than those obtained from sham-operated controls following challenge. SP concentration remained elevated for 2.5 h following immune challenge in neuropathic animals compared to 90 min in sham-operated animals. Compared with controls, neuropathic animals also exhibited an increased DTH response that was reversed, in a dose-related fashion, by the non-peptide NK-1 receptor blocker L-703,606. The same antagonist had no effect in sham-operated animals. These data suggest that the increased DTH response in animals subjected to unilateral mononeuropathy involves SP and NK-1 receptors present in the challenged tissue.
    Journal of Neuroimmunology 05/1996; 65(2):119-24. · 3.03 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

662 Citations
85.94 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2008
    • University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
      • Lois Pope LIFE Center
      Miami, Florida, United States
    • Acorda Therapeutics
      Ardsley, New York, United States
  • 1998–2001
    • Bar Ilan University
      • Faculty of Life Sciences
      Ramat Gan, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • 1999
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (Chicago)
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 1997–1998
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Branch of Behavioral Neuroscience
      Maryland, United States
  • 1994–1996
    • University of Minnesota Duluth
      Duluth, Minnesota, United States