Angela L Zachman

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Michigan, United States

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Publications (11)57.62 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A reactive oxygen species (ROS)-degradable scaffold is fabricated by crosslinking biocompatible, hydrolytically-degradable poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) with a ROS-degradable oligoproline peptide, KP7K. The ROS-mediated degradability triggers favorable host responses of the scaffold including improved cell infiltration and angiogenesis in vivo, indicating its unique advantages for tissue engineering applications.
    J. Mater. Chem. B. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by vessel occlusion and ischemia in the limbs. Treatment for PAD with surgical interventions has been showing limited success. Moreover, recent clinical trials with treatment of angiogenic growth factors proved ineffective as increased angiogenesis triggered severe inflammation in a proportionally coupled fashion. Hence, the overarching goal of this research was to address this issue by developing a biomaterial system that enables controlled, dual delivery of pro-angiogenic C16 and anti-inflammatory Ac-SDKP peptides in a minimally-invasive way. To achieve the goal, a peptide-loaded injectable microgel system was developed and tested in a mouse model of PAD. When delivered through multiple, low volume injections, the combination of C16 and Ac-SDKP peptides promoted angiogenesis, muscle regeneration, and perfusion recovery, while minimizing detrimental inflammation. Additionally, this peptide combination regulated inflammatory TNF-α pathways independently of MMP-9 mediated pathways of angiogenesis in vitro, suggesting a potential mechanism by which angiogenic and inflammatory responses can be uncoupled in the context of PAD. This study demonstrates a translatable potential of the dual peptide-loaded injectable microgel system for PAD treatment.
    Biomaterials 08/2014; · 8.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biodegradable polymers have been applied as bulk or coating materials for coronary artery stents. The degradation of polymers, however, could induce endothelial dysfunction and aggravate neointimal formation. Here we use polymeric microparticles to simulate and demonstrate the effects of degraded stent materials on phagocytic activity, cell death and dysfunction of macrophages and endothelial cells. Microparticles made of low molecular weight polyesters were incubated with human macrophages and coronary artery endothelial cells (ECs). Microparticle-induced phagocytosis, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cytokine release and surface marker expression were determined by immunostaining or ELISA. Elastase expression was analyzed by ELISA and the elastase-mediated polymer degradation was assessed by mass spectrometry. We demonstrated that poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) microparticles induced cytotoxicity in macrophages and ECs, partially through cell apoptosis. The particle treatment alleviated EC phagocytosis, as opposed to macrophages, but enhanced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 along with decreased nitric oxide production, indicating that ECs were activated and lost their capacity to maintain homeostasis. The activation of both cell types induced the release of elastase or elastase-like protease, which further accelerated polymer degradation. This study revealed that low molecule weight PLLA and PCL microparticles increased cytotoxicity and dysregulated endothelial cell function, which in turn enhanced elastase release and polymer degradation. These indicate that polymer or polymer-coated stents impose a risk of endothelial dysfunction after deployment which can potentially lead to delayed endothelialization, neointimal hyperplasia and late thrombosis.
    International journal of cardiology 04/2014; · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Remarkable achievements have been made in the clinical application of mechanical circulatory support and cardiac transplantation for patients with end-stage heart failure. Despite the successes, complications associated with these therapies continue to drive cardiac regenerative research utilizing stem cell based therapies. Multiple stem cell lineages hold clinical promise for cardiac regeneration—mostly through cellular differentiation, cellular fusion, and paracrine signaling mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells are among the most intriguing and controversial cell types currently being investigated. Formidable barriers exist, however, in finding the ideal cardiac regenerative stem cell, such as identifying specific lineage markers, optimizing in vitro cellular expansion and improving methods of stem cell delivery. Hybrid approaches of cardiac regeneration using stem cell therapies in conjunction with immunomodulation after cardiac transplantation or with mechanical circulatory support produce cutting edge stem cell technologies. This review summarizes the current knowledge and therapeutic applications of stem cells in patients with end-stage heart failure, including stem cell therapy after implantation of mechanical circulatory support and cardiac transplantation. J. Cell. Biochem. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 02/2014; · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The major goal of this study was to create easy-to-use, reusable substrates capable of storing any peptides or bioactive molecules for a desired period of time until cells uptake them without the need for bioactive molecule or peptide-specific techniques. Nanopore arrays of uniform size and distribution were machined into fused silica substrates using femtosecond laser ablation and loaded with peptides by simple adsorption. The nanopore substrates were validated by examining the effect of N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) loaded nanopores on macrophage phagocytosis and intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with and without the pro-inflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrated that nanopores were generated in a uniform array fashion. Ac-SDKP peptides were stably stored in nanopores and internalized by macrophages. Significant reductions in ROS production and phagocytosis in macrophages were observed over control substrates, even in combination with LPS stimulation, indicating that loading Ac-SDKP peptides in pores significantly improved the anti-inflammatory effects.
    Nanomedicine: nanotechnology, biology, and medicine 09/2013; · 6.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Circulating monocytes undergo spontaneous apoptosis when there is no activation stimulus, which is critical to population control for proper host response to implants. As activation and apoptosis of monocytes/macrophages are regulated by cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, in this study, their regulatory mechanism was investigated using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-containing polyurethane (PUR) films in which PEG-rich and polyester-rich domains were phase separated. Human blood monocyte derived macrophages (HBMs) preferentially adhered to PEG domains (cell-matrix interaction) due to the low molecular weight (600 g/mol), resulting in increased HBM density (cell-cell interaction). As both cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions were promoted, HBM apoptosis increased, while their activation as measured by phagocytosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 production decreased compared to PEG-free films. When cell seeding density and cell-adhesive gelatin coating on silicone films were controlled, a cooperative role of cell-matrix (adhesion) and cell-cell (density) interactions in inducing HBM apoptosis was observed. Expression of macrophage adhesion molecule CD11b caused apoptosis in this context, which was mediated by tissue necrosis factor (TNF)-α signaling but down-regulated by a ROS inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and anti-inflammatory peptide Ac-SDKP, suggesting a new concept to design biomaterials that allow for cell adhesion without excessive inflammatory activation.
    Acta biomaterialia 11/2012; · 5.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammation and angiogenesis are inevitable in vivo responses to biomaterial implants. Continuous progress has been made in biomaterial design to improve tissue interactions with an implant by either reducing inflammation or promoting angiogenesis. However, it has become increasingly clear that the physiological processes of inflammation and angiogenesis are interconnected through various molecular mechanisms. Hence, there is an unmet need for engineering functional tissues by simultaneous activation of pro-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants. In this work, the modulus and fibrinogen adsorption of porous scaffolds were tuned to meet the requirements (i.e., ∼100 kPa and ∼10 nm, respectively), for soft tissue regeneration by employing tyrosine-derived combinatorial polymers with polyethylene glycol crosslinkers. Two types of functional peptides (i.e., pro-angiogenic laminin-derived C16 and anti-inflammatory thymosin β4-derived Ac-SDKP) were loaded in porous scaffolds through collagen gel embedding so that peptides were released in a controlled fashion, mimicking degradation of the extracellular matrix. The results from (1) in vitro coculture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human blood-derived macrophages and (2) in vivo subcutaneous implantation revealed the directly proportional relationship between angiogenic activities (i.e., tubulogenesis and perfusion capacity) and inflammatory activities (i.e., phagocytosis and F4/80 expression) upon treatment with either type of peptide. Interestingly, cotreatment with both types of peptides upregulated the angiogenic responses, while downregulating the inflammatory responses. Also, anti-inflammatory Ac-SDKP peptides reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha) even when treated in combination with pro-angiogenic C16 peptides. In addition to independent regulation of angiogenesis and inflammation, this study suggests a promising approach to improve soft tissue regeneration (e.g., blood vessel and heart muscle) when inflammatory diseases (e.g., ischemic tissue fibrosis and atherosclerosis) limit the regeneration process.
    Tissue Engineering Part A 09/2012; · 4.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Determining how a biomaterial interacts with cells ("structure-function relationship") reflects its eventual clinical applicability. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how individual material properties modulate cell-biomaterial interactions is pivotal to improving the efficacy and safety of clinically translatable biomaterial systems. However, due to the coupled nature of material properties, their individual effects on cellular responses are difficult to understand. Structure-function relationships can be more clearly understood by the effective decoupling of each individual parameter. In this article, we discuss three basic decoupling strategies: (1) surface modification, (2) cross-linking, and (3) combinatorial approaches (i.e., copolymerization and polymer blending). Relevant examples of coupled material properties are briefly reviewed in each section to highlight the need for improved decoupling methods. This follows with examples of more effective decoupling techniques, mainly from the perspective of three primary classes of synthetic materials: polyesters, polyethylene glycol, and polyacrylamide. Recent strides in decoupling methodologies, especially surface-patterning and combinatorial techniques, offer much promise in further understanding the structure-function relationships that largely govern the success of future advancements in biomaterials, tissue engineering, and drug delivery.
    Tissue Engineering Part B Reviews 04/2012; 18(5):396-404. · 4.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polymer properties can be tailored by copolymerizing subunits with specific physico-chemical characteristics. Vascular stent materials require biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and prevention of restenosis. Here we copolymerized poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and carboxyl-PCL (cPCL) at varying molar ratios and characterized the resulting material properties. We then performed a short-term evaluation of these polymers for their applicability as potential coronary stent coating materials with two primary human coronary artery cell types: smooth muscle cells (HCASMC) and endothelial cells (HCAEC). Changes in proliferation and phenotype were dependent upon intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and 4%PEG-96%PCL-0%cPCL was identified as the most appropriate coating material for this application. After 3days on this substrate HCASMC maintained a healthy contractile phenotype and HCAEC exhibited a physiologically relevant proliferation rate and a balanced redox state. Other test substrates promoted a pathological, synthetic phenotype of HCASMC and/or hyperproliferation of HCAEC. Phenotypic changes of HCASMC appeared to be modulated by the Young's modulus and surface charge of the test substrates, indicating a structure-function relationship that can be exploited for intricate control over vascular cell functions. These data indicate that tailored copolymer properties can direct vascular cell behavior and provide insights for further development of biologically instructive stent coating materials.
    Acta biomaterialia 02/2012; 8(2):559-69. · 5.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic inflammation-mediated oxidative stress is a common mechanism of implant rejection and failure. Therefore, polymer scaffolds that can degrade slowly in response to this environment may provide a viable platform for implant site-specific, sustained release of immunomodulatory agents over a long time period. In this work, proline oligomers of varying lengths (P(n)) were synthesized and exposed to oxidative environments, and their accelerated degradation under oxidative conditions was verified via high performance liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography. Next, diblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) were carboxylated to form 100 kDa terpolymers of 4%PEG-86%PCL-10%cPCL (cPCL = poly(carboxyl-ε-caprolactone); i% indicates molar ratio). The polymers were then cross-linked with biaminated PEG-P(n)-PEG chains, where P(n) indicates the length of the proline oligomer flanked by PEG chains. Salt-leaching of the polymeric matrices created scaffolds of macroporous and microporous architecture, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The degradation of scaffolds was accelerated under oxidative conditions, as evidenced by mass loss and differential scanning calorimetry measurements. Immortalized murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages were then seeded on the scaffolds and activated through the addition of γ-interferon and lipopolysaccharide throughout the 9-day study period. This treatment promoted the release of H(2)O(2) by the macrophages and the degradation of proline-containing scaffolds compared to the control scaffolds. The accelerated degradation was evidenced by increased scaffold porosity, as visualized through scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography imaging. The current study provides insight into the development of scaffolds that respond to oxidative environments through gradual degradation for the controlled release of therapeutics targeted to diseases that feature chronic inflammation and oxidative stress.
    Biomacromolecules 12/2011; 12(12):4357-66. · 5.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Characterization of the degradation mechanism of polymeric scaffolds and delivery systems for regenerative medicine is essential to assess their clinical applicability. Key performance criteria include induction of a minimal, transient inflammatory response and controlled degradation to soluble non-cytotoxic breakdown products that are cleared from the body by physiological processes. Scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable poly(ester urethane)s (PEURs) undergo controlled degradation to non-cytotoxic breakdown products and support the ingrowth of new tissue in preclinical models of tissue regeneration. While previous studies have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine-derived polyisocyanates degrade faster under in vivo compared to in vitro conditions, the degradation mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine triisocyanate (LTI) or a trimer of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDIt) undergo hydrolytic, esterolytic, and oxidative degradation. Hydrolysis of ester bonds to yield α-hydroxy acids is the dominant mechanism in buffer, and esterolytic media modestly increase the degradation rate. While HDIt scaffolds show a modest (<20%) increase in degradation rate in oxidative medium, LTI scaffolds degrade six times faster in oxidative medium. Furthermore, the in vitro rate of degradation of LTI scaffolds in oxidative medium approximates the in vivo rate in rat excisional wounds, and histological sections show macrophages expressing myeloperoxidase at the material surface. While recent preclinical studies have underscored the potential of injectable PEUR scaffolds and delivery systems for tissue regeneration, this promising class of biomaterials has a limited regulatory history. Elucidation of the macrophage-mediated oxidative mechanism by which LTI scaffolds degrade in vivo provides key insights into the ultimate fate of these materials when injected into the body.
    Biomaterials 01/2011; 32(2):419-29. · 8.31 Impact Factor