Angela B Shiue

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States

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Publications (2)7.15 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Troponin levels have been correlated with adverse outcomes in multiple disease processes, including congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, sepsis, and, in a few small series, infective endocarditis. We hypothesized that a novel measurement of troponin using a highly sensitive assay would correlate with adverse outcomes when prospectively studied in patients with infective endocarditis. At a single center in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis, 42 patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent testing for cardiac troponin T (cTnT) using both a standard and a highly sensitive precommercial assay. The cTnT levels were associated with the prespecified primary composite outcome of death, central nervous system event, and cardiac abscess. Secondary outcomes included the individual components of the composite outcome and the need for cardiac surgery. A receiver operating characteristic curve was derived and used to identify the optimal cutpoint for cTnT using the highly sensitive assay. cTnT was detectable with the highly sensitive assay in 39 (93%) of 42 patients with infective endocarditis and with the standard assay in 25 (56%) of 42 (p <0.05). Of the 42 patients, 15 experienced the composite outcome, 4 died, 9 had a central nervous system event, and 5 had a cardiac abscess. With the hs-cTnT assay, the median cTnT was greater in the patients who experienced the primary outcome (0.12 vs 0.02 ng/ml, p <0.05). According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (area under the curve of 0.74), cTnT levels of ≥0.08 ng/ml produced optimal specificity (78%) for the primary outcome. The patients with a cTnT level of ≥0.08 ng/ml were more likely to experience the primary outcome (odds ratio 7.0, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 28.6, p <0.01) and a central nervous system event (odds ratio 9.3, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 24.1, p = 0.02). In conclusion, cTnT is detectable in 93% of patients with infective endocarditis using a novel highly sensitive assay, with higher levels correlating with poor clinical outcomes.
    The American journal of cardiology 05/2011; 108(3):416-20. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a marker of poor outcomes in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, and sepsis. Elevated cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is associated with adverse outcomes in infective endocarditis. It was hypothesized that elevated BNP would be associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality in patients with infective endocarditis, particularly when combined with elevated cTnI. Consecutively enrolled patients in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Prospective Cohort Study (ICE-PCS) were evaluated at a single center. The association between elevated BNP and a composite outcome of death, intracardiac abscess, and central nervous system event and the individual components of the composite was determined. Similar analyses were performed in patients who had BNP and cTnI measured. Of 103 patients, 45 had BNP measured for clinical indications. The median BNP level was higher in patients with the composite outcome (1,498 vs 433 pg/ml, p = 0.03) and in those who died (2,150 vs 628 pg/ml, p = 0.04). Elevated BNP was significantly associated with the composite outcome (p <0.01) and intracardiac abscess (p = 0.02). Patients with elevation of BNP and cTnI had a significantly higher probability of the composite outcome (69%) than patients with either BNP or cTnI elevated (29%) or neither BNP nor troponin elevated (0%) (p for trend <0.01). In conclusion, these data demonstrate a significant association between elevated BNP alone and in combination with cTnI for serious outcomes in infective endocarditis and warrant prospective evaluation.
    The American journal of cardiology 10/2010; 106(7):1011-5. · 3.58 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

9 Citations
7.15 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010
    • University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
      • Medical School
      Dallas, TX, United States