Anastasia Pharris

Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden

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Publications (7)12.12 Total impact

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    Dataset: Paper III
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Stigma has been identified as a major barrier to HIV response. While much is known about stigma directed towards people living with HIV (PLHIV), less is known about stigma experienced by health workers who treat PLHIV. This study aims to explore the perceptions and experiences of health workers regarding how stigma influences their work with HIV-positive patients. The study employed a qualitative design involving individual semi-structured in-depth interviews with 14 health workers, purposively selected from hospitals and detention centres for people who use drugs and sex workers in Hanoi, Vietnam. Findings showed that the stigma experienced by health workers may be organised around several themes: (1) lack of social prestige associated with HIV work; (2) fear of infection expressed by family members; (3) feelings of being devalued within the healthcare field; and (4) work-related stress and burnout, especially for staff working in detention centres for drug users and female sex workers. Efforts are needed to improve the public image of HIV work, scale up stigma reduction, enhance stress management and create a safe and supportive working environment for health workers.
    Global Public Health 06/2013; DOI:10.1080/17441692.2013.799217 · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Among people living with HIV (PLHIV) on antiretroviral therapy (ART), it is important to determine how quality of life (QOL) may be improved and HIV-related stigma can be lessened over time. This study assessed the effect of peer support on QOL and internal stigma during the first year after initiating ART among a cohort of PLHIV in north-eastern Vietnam. METHODS: A sub-sample study of a randomised controlled trial was implemented between October 2008 and November 2010 in Quang Ninh, Vietnam. In the intervention group, participants (n=119) received adherence support from trained peer supporters who visited participants' houses biweekly during the first two months, thereafter weekly. In the control group, participants (n=109) were treated according to standard guidelines, including adherence counselling, monthly health check and drug refills. Basic demographics were measured at baseline. QOL and internal stigma were measured using a Vietnamese version of the WHOQOL-HIVBREF and Internal AIDS-related Stigma Scale instruments at baseline and 12 months. T-tests were used to detect the differences between mean values, multilevel linear regressions to determine factors influencing QOL. RESULTS: Overall, QOL improved significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group. Among participants initiating ART at clinical stages 3 and 4, education at high school level or above and having experiences of a family member dying from HIV were also associated with higher reported QOL. Among participants at clinical stage 1 and 2, there was no significant effect of peer support, whereas having children was associated with an increased QOL. Viral hepatitis was associated with a decreased QOL in both groups. Lower perceived stigma correlated significantly but weakly with improved QOL, however, there was no significant relation to peer support. CONCLUSION: The peer support intervention improved QOL after 12 months among ART patients presenting at clinical stages 3 and 4 at baseline, but it had no impact on QOL among ART patients enrolled at clinical stages 1 and 2. The intervention did not have an effect on Internal AIDS-related stigma. To improve QOL for PLHIV on ART, measures to support adherence should be contextualized in accordance with individual clinical and social needs. KEYWORDS: Quality of life, Peer support, HIV, ART, Quang Ninh, Vietnam, randomised controlled trial.
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 05/2012; 10(1):53. DOI:10.1186/1477-7525-10-53 · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The negative effects of stigma on persons living with HIV (PLHIV) have been documented in many settings and it is thought that stigma against PLHIV leads to more difficulties for those who need to access HIV testing, treatment and care, as well as to limited community uptake of HIV prevention and testing messages. In order to understand and prevent stigma towards PLHIV, it is important to be able to measure stigma within communities and to understand which factors are associated with higher stigma. To analyze patterns of community stigma and determinants to stigma toward PLHIV, we performed an exploratory population-based survey with 1874 randomly sampled adults within a demographic surveillance site (DSS) in rural Vietnam. Participants were interviewed regarding knowledge of HIV and attitudes towards persons living with HIV. Data were linked to socioeconomic and migration data from the DSS and latent class analysis and multinomial logistic regression were conducted to examine stigma group sub-types and factors associated with stigma group membership. We found unexpectedly high and complex patterns of stigma against PLHIV in this rural setting. Women had the greatest odds of belong to the highest stigma group (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.42-2.37), while those with more education had lower odds of highest stigma group membership (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.32-0.62 for secondary education; OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.10-0.35 for tertiary education). Long-term migration out of the district (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.4-0.91), feeling at-risk for HIV (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.27-0.66), having heard of HIV from more sources (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.3-0.66), and knowing someone with HIV (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.58-0.99) were all associated with lower odds of highest stigma group membership. Nearly 20% of the population was highly unsure of their attitudes towards PLHIV and persons in this group had significantly lower odds of feeling at-risk for HIV (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.33-0.90) or of knowing someone with HIV (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.22-0.46). Stigma towards PLHIV is high generally, and very high in some sub-groups, in this community setting. Future stigma prevention efforts could be enhanced by analyzing community stigma sub-groups and tailoring intervention messages to community patterns of stigma.
    BMC Public Health 09/2011; 11:705. DOI:10.1186/1471-2458-11-705 · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) started to become more widely available in Vietnam in 2005. However, up to now, very little is known about factors influencing ART adherence among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Vietnam. This qualitative study aimed to describe factors influencing ART adherence among PLHIV in a northern province in Vietnam, and to explore possibilities of home delivery of ART. Forty-eight participants (36 men and 12 women), including patients on ART and their relatives, were divided in seven focus group discussions. The topics discussed included: adherence obstacles encountered during ART, methods patients used to enhance adherence, treatment support structures, and attitudes toward home delivery of ART. All interviews were audio-recorded, then transcribed in Vietnamese. Manual manifest and latent content analysis was applied for data analysis in order to elucidate the presence of, meaning of, and relationships between concepts in the text. Stigma was identified as a strong barrier to ART adherence, as patients feared that taking medications in the presence of other persons would lead to suspicion or inadvertent disclosure of their HIV status. In addition to desires for non-disclosure influencing PLHIV's adherence, it also shaped their attitudes toward opting for more confidential ways of receiving ART support and care. Home delivery of ART medications was seen as undesirable by participants, who feared that it might increase social stigmatization. Participants wished for more community-based support, preferably from PLHIV who had received sufficient training. Based on the results of this study, an intervention strategy using PLHIV as community-based adherence supporters is currently being evaluated in a randomized controlled trial intervention, including 640 patients in Quang Ninh, Vietnam.
    AIDS Care 02/2011; 23(2):139-45. DOI:10.1080/09540121.2010.507741 · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To improve HIV prevention and care programs, it is important to understand the uptake of HIV testing and to identify population segments in need of increased HIV testing. This is particularly crucial in countries with concentrated HIV epidemics, where HIV prevalence continues to rise in the general population. This study analyzes determinants of HIV testing in a rural Vietnamese population in order to identify potential access barriers and areas for promoting HIV testing services. A population-based cross-sectional survey of 1874 randomly sampled adults was linked to pregnancy, migration and economic cohort data from a demographic surveillance site (DSS). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine which factors were associated with having tested for HIV. The age-adjusted prevalence of ever-testing for HIV was 7.6%; however 79% of those who reported feeling at-risk of contracting HIV had never tested. In multivariate analysis, younger age (aOR 1.85, 95% CI 1.14-3.01), higher economic status (aOR 3.4, 95% CI 2.21-5.22), and semi-urban residence (aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.53-3.66) were associated with having been tested for HIV. HIV testing rates did not differ between women of reproductive age who had recently been pregnant and those who had not. We found low testing uptake (6%) among pregnant women despite an existing prevention of mother-to-child HIV testing policy, and lower-than-expected testing among persons who felt that they were at-risk of HIV. Poverty and residence in a more geographically remote location were associated with less HIV testing. In addition to current HIV testing strategies focusing on high-risk groups, we recommend targeting HIV testing in concentrated HIV epidemic settings to focus on a scaled-up provision of antenatal testing. Additional recommendations include removing financial and geographic access barriers to client-initiated testing, and encouraging provider-initiated testing of those who believe that they are at-risk of HIV.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(1):e16017. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0016017 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Policymaking in Vietnam has traditionally been the preserve of the political elite, not open to the scrutiny of those outside the Communist Party. This paper aims to analyse Vietnam's HIV policy development in order to describe and understand the policy content, policy-making processes, actors and obstacles to policy implementation. Nine policy documents on HIV were analysed and 17 key informant interviews were conducted in Hanoi and Quang Ninh Province, based on a predesigned interview guide. Framework analysis, a type of qualitative content analysis, was applied for data analysis. Our main finding was that during the last two decades, developments in HIV policy in Vietnam were driven in a top-down way by the state organs, with support and resources coming from international agencies. Four major themes were identified: HIV policy content, the policy-making processes, the actors involved and human resources for policy implementation. Vietnam's HIV policy has evolved from one focused on punitive control measures to a more rights-based approach, encompassing harm reduction and payment of health insurance for medical costs of patients with HIV-related illness. Low salaries and staff reluctance to work with patients, many of whom are drug users and female sex workers, were described as the main barriers to low health staff motivation. Health policy analysis approaches can be applied in a traditional one party state and can demonstrate how similar policy changes take place, as those found in pluralistic societies, but through more top-down and somewhat hidden processes. Enhanced participation of other actors, like civil society in the policy process, is likely to contribute to policy formulation and implementation that meets the diverse needs and concerns of its population.
    Global Health Action 08/2010; 3. DOI:10.3402/gha.v3i0.4625 · 1.65 Impact Factor