A Truchaud

Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Compiègne, Picardie, France

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Publications (22)33 Total impact

  • L. Piazza, T. Le Neel, D. Morin, A. Truchaud
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    ABSTRACT: Practice of Point of Care Testing in medical care centre is very unequal in France despite official guidelines of governmental agencies and laboratory professionals. Last years, a lot of advances in devices technology have been performed particularly in term of connectivity, quality control and traceability with apparition of new global solutions. These possibilities open new perspectives in point of care testing organization in France. We suggest an overall view with the introduction of a coordinator of all point of care testing to coordinate the different actors at every step of the project, from decision to installation of the chosen solutions.
    ITBM-RBM 05/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: Robotic laboratory equipment malfunctions may affect the performance of integrated laboratory instruments. Thus, the qualification of robotics is necessary to ensure adequate performance of complete integrated systems. In this JALA Tutorial, we adapt the methods used in production processes to laboratory robotics and propose guidelines for performing the various steps required for qualification (i.e., installation, operational, and performance qualification), while emphasizing specific aspects of laboratory robotics. We think that the application of such guidelines will help in standardizing the acceptance of robotic equipment, facilitate their operation and performance evaluation, and improve traceability with quality assurance documentation.
    Journal of the Association for Laboratory Automation 02/2005; 10(1):48-53. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new multicapillary zone electrophoresis instrument, the Capillarys, was recently launched by Sebia Company. We integrated the Capillarys in an automated workcell that is able to pick tubes from a sample transportation system and arrange them in the right position for bar code reading on the racks of the Capillarys. The racks are transported and loaded on the Capillarys by the robot. After analysis, racks are automatically collected and transferred to a stacker, to wait for storage, waste management, or transportation to another instrument. We built a prototype, and to validate the workcell, we performed a Qualification Plan. The various tests did not reveal important errors in the design of the prototype, but some slight defects in safety, materials, and software were identified. The final decision was to validate the Qualification. The method of Qualification was found to be very efficient for evaluation of the prototype and early detection of necessary improvements. As a result, the risk of modifications required in customer laboratories was limited.
    Journal of the Association for Laboratory Automation 02/2005; 10(1):54-58. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the benefits of automation on the technical performance of a new automated cell culture incubator, the Autocell 200®, developed by Jouan SA. In addition, we assessed the potential interference of the embedded mechanical parts on cell culture growth. We measured a throughput of 150 plates loaded per hour, and 120 plates unloaded per hour, which is compatible with an external robotic handler. The mean time of robotic gate opening was 7 s. The gate pathway minimized climate disturbances inside the incubator. For CO2, we used a delay between opening events of 1 min. Biological assay results did not demonstrate a significant difference between the automated incubator and a traditional manual incubator, but we concluded that automation using the Autocell 200® could provide meaningful benefits for cell culture.
    Journal of the Association for Laboratory Automation 12/2003; 8(6):87-95. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Automated cell culture incubators generally are considered primary components of fully automated cell culture systems, which are able to monitor cell growth without human interaction. This tutorial is focused on automated cell culture incubators. It emphasizes the impact of automation on throughput and environmental controls (temperature, humidity, and CO2) and proposes some basic protocols to check these functions. In addition, it details practical aspects for switching from manual to automated cell culture incubators.
    Journal of the Association for Laboratory Automation 12/2003; 8(6):82-86. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The introduction of immunochemical techniques into the routine pathology laboratory has significantly expanded the capabilities of the pathologist in diagnostic procedures. Immunostaining represents a powerful diagnostic tool in the identification and localization of cellular antigens, in paraffin sections, frozen tissues and cell preparations. The labeled-streptavidin-biotin method provides excellent sensitivity and performance. This multistep procedure includes: incubation of the slide with primary antibody, reaction with the biotinylated secondary antibody, binding with an enzyme conjugated streptavidin and revelation with chromogen substrate. Evaluation of the finished product is directly dependent on the quality of the technique. The main critical steps of this manual method are reagents application, incubation times and rinsing. These steps could be accessible to automation. Automation in immunohistochemistry could guarantee a continuous quality of labelling in improving standardisation, optimization and traceability of operations. The required qualifications are analytical flexibility, low cost, walkaway operation, user-friendly interface and biosafety.
    Clinica Chimica Acta 01/1999; 278(2):177-84. · 2.76 Impact Factor
  • T Le Neel, A Moreau, C Laboisse, A Truchaud
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    ABSTRACT: From October 1995 to March 1997, we evaluated five instruments for immunohistochemistry automation: The Techmate 500 (Dako), the Ventana 320/ES (Ventana), the Optimax Plus (Biogenex, Menarini), the Cadenza (Shandon), and the Immunostainer (Coulter-Immunotech). The aim of the evaluation was to compare the different instruments to the manual method in our laboratory which performs about 17 500 immunohistochemistries per year. PRINCIPLE: Three instruments use flat immunohistolabelling, the others use capillarity immunohistolabelling. ANALYTICAL FLEXIBILITY: we compared the number of protocols per run, the multitask capability, and the ability to adapt manual protocols to the different instruments. To compare the management of the workcell, we used the level of selfchecking, reagent and slides preparation time, and waste management. We measured the duration of the different steps of the process, the throughput in slides/h, and the operator working time per slide. Compared to the manual method, the total cost for reagents and consumables was found to be multiplied by 3 for the Ventana which is a closed system, by 2 for the Techmate, by 1.5 for the Optimax and Cadenza, and identical for the Immunostainer. CONCLUSION: Automation of immunohistochemistry is now possible; the Optimax is still in development, small laboratories will appreciate the Cadenza, laboratories requiring a high flexibility with many protocols will use the Immunostainer open system, laboratories with few technicians will prefer the Ventana closed instrument, now available as the Nexes modular system.
    Clinica Chimica Acta 01/1999; 278(2):185-92. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To face the rapid evolution of the clinical laboratory activity from sample analysis towards an in-vitro diagnostic network, a Total Quality Management system must be implemented by laboratory professionals. Technological advances make it possible to introduce new tools and techniques for many issues surrounding the analytical process, as has happened for analysis automation and laboratory management. Preanalytical steps should benefit from extended traceability, using new identification devices such as electronic labels. This may promote the improvement of sample handling in this phase, such as during transportation or centrifugation. Another field is the expansion of metrology. Many factors can now easily be controlled in the clinical laboratory. New reliable automated systems are available to evaluate the performance of pipetting devices. Autonomous miniaturized recorders and probes connected to monitoring softwares allow traceable temperature monitoring. In this paper, some examples are presented to illustrate how technical solutions can support the implementation of Quality Assurance in the clinical laboratory.
    Clinica Chimica Acta 01/1999; 278(2):103-10. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical laboratory is changing from a place of activity based on sample analysis to an in vitro diagnostic network. To convince our team, partners, and administrators, we need new comprehensive tools to define a strategy with limited risk of failure or conflicts. Specific quality goals should be established before choosing automated tools for sample handling, analytical systems, laboratory information systems, communication systems, or advanced technologies. A system approach maps and simplifies the process, based more on a functional study than on classical disciplines. A customer-supplier approach establishes the requirements between partners either inside or outside the laboratory. The quality system must be a management tool, linking samples, tasks, information, and documents. Quantitative simulation modeling explores different automation alternatives and their impact on laboratory workflow. Finally, integration of results in interactive semirealistic simulation tools for laboratory design or reengineering can be used as communications tools to involve laboratory professionals in the change of their practice.
    Clinical Chemistry 10/1997; 43(9):1709-15. · 7.77 Impact Factor
  • Clinical Biochemistry 05/1996; 29(2):171-3. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI), both as expert systems and as neural networks.This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation, and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system.In the second part of the paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories.It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual propery, and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used in clinical laboratories.
    The Journal of automatic chemistry 02/1995; 17(1):1-15.
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    ABSTRACT: The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) both as expert systems and as neural networks. This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel-processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system. In the second part of this paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories. It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual property and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used widely in clinical laboratories.
    Clinica Chimica Acta 01/1995; 231(2):S5-34. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To consider the role of software in system operation, control and automation, and attempts to define intelligence. Methods and Results: Artificial intelligence (AI) is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system. In the second part of this paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories. Conclusion: AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual property, and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used widely in clinical laboratories.
    The Journal of automatic chemistry 12/1994;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper introduces a systematic approach to organizing the discipline of clinical chemistry. The approach is called a top-down, systems approach because it starts at the top with the most general concepts and works down through less general concepts to the most specific details and techniques. The hypothesis is that the discipline can be organized into hierarchical levels of functional processes and operational approaches to those processes. The functional processes represent what clinical scientists do; the operational approaches represent how they do it. Because functional processes change little, if at all, with time, they are use to develop a stable infrastructure or framework for the discipline. That infrastructure is then used to organize and understand operational approaches that tend to change rapidly with time in response to technological advances. This paper begins with the most general functional processes and then uses selected examples of the more general functions to illustrate lower hierarchical levels of functional processes and operational approaches.
    Annales de biologie clinique 02/1994; 52(4):311-20. · 0.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biosafety is an important part of the know-how of all clinical laboratory professionals. Biosafely must have high priority in the design and use of analytical systems. Attention should be focused on reducing the handling of biological specimens, reducing biohazards to laboratory personnel, and on improving the labelling and containment of biohazardous materials. In this paper, biosafety issues are discussed in relation to the design of analytical systems, their use and maintenance.
    The Journal of automatic chemistry 02/1994; 16(2):67-70.
  • Annales de biologie clinique 02/1994; 52(5):393-6. · 0.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper introduces a systematic approach to organizing the discipline of clinical chemistry. The approach is called a top-down, systems approach because it starts at the top with the most general concepts and works down through less general concepts to the most specific details and techniques. The hypothesis is that the discipline can be organized into hierarchical levels of functional processes and operational approaches to those processes. The functional processes represent what clinical scientists do; the operatinal approaches represent how they do it. Because functional processes change little, if at all, with time, they are used to develop a stable infrastructure or framework for the discipline. That infrastructure is then used to organize and understand operational approaches that tend to change rapidly with time in response to technological advances. The paper begins with the most general functional processes and then uses selected examples of the more general functions to illustrate lower hierarchical levels or functional processes and operational approaches.
    The Journal of automatic chemistry 02/1993; 15(6):217-26.
  • A Truchaud, T Le Neel, J.C Bisconte
    Biology of the Cell 01/1993; 79(3):270. · 3.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper provides an in-depth description of the current applications of robotics in clinical laboratories. The trends and impact of the use of robotics in clinical chemistry in the forseeable future are also discussed.
    Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry / IFCC 10/1992; 4(4):174-81.
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing numbers of robots are going to be employed industrial chemical laboratories. Most of these will be used to reduce the monotonous tasks of sample preparation, to minimize human exposure to dangerous environments or to carry out huge numbers of repetitive experimental procedures. For example, looking for the most effective condition or combination in chemical synthesis or the best microorganism in a large number of cultures. In the clinical laboratory the situation is slightly different and robotics is not so widely applied in clinical laboratories, but there is a definite trend to employ robots or robotic systems both to reduce labor volume and exposure of employees to possible biohazards and to help get more precise and correct results. These needs will be hard to fulfill via the usual automated devices and especially when adequate devices are not available. Specially designed machines will have to be produced to satisfy these demands and robotics will play a part. Finally we need to evaluate the effectivity of introduction of robotics in terms of economy, strategy, biosafety and other aspects. Typical examples of implementation of robotics in the clinical laboratory are transportation of specimens, front-end automation of sample preparation, separation and aliquotting as well as selected processes in a large scale automation systems. As described previously, robots that are commercially available now, are not intelligent enough to be easily handled by personnel who are not trained for robotics. There is a need for personnel dedicated to robotics who join the project from the very beginning of the plan and who can maintain the system properly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    Annales de biologie clinique 02/1991; 49(10):528-35. · 0.42 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

59 Citations
33.00 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006
    • Université de Technologie de Compiègne
      Compiègne, Picardie, France
  • 1997
    • University of Nantes
      Naoned, Pays de la Loire, France
  • 1995
    • Dako Denmark A/S
      Glostrup, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 1994
    • Purdue University
      • Department of Chemistry
      West Lafayette, IN, United States
  • 1993
    • Collège de France
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France