Antje Rademacher

Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, München, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (12)20.11 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To explore the association of the postthrombotic syndrome with venous hemodynamics and morphological abnormalities after upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. Thirty-seven patients with a history of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis treated with anticoagulation alone underwent a single study visit (mean time after diagnosis: 44.4 ± 28.1 months). Presence and severity postthrombotic syndrome were classified according to the modified Villalta score. Venous volume and venous emptying were determined by strain-gauge plethysmography. The arm veins were assessed for postthrombotic abnormalities by ultrasonography. The relationship between postthrombotic syndrome and hemodynamic and morphological sequelae was evaluated using univariate significance tests and Spearman's correlation analysis. Fifteen of 37 patients (40.5%) developed postthrombotic syndrome. Venous volume and venous emptying of the arm affected by upper extremity deep venous thrombosis did not correlate with the Villalta score (rho = 0.17 and 0.19; p = 0.31 and 0.25, respectively). Residual morphological abnormalities, as assessed by ultrasonography, did not differ significantly between patients with and without postthrombotic syndrome (77.3% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.68). Postthrombotic syndrome after upper extremity deep venous thrombosis is not associated with venous hemodynamics or residual morphological abnormalities.
    Phlebology 12/2013; · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the impact of the postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) on quality of life after primary upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). Twenty-five patients with a history of primary UEDVT, treated with anticoagulation alone, and twenty healthy controls were retrospectively identified and prospectively assessed for health-related quality of life (SF-36 and VEINES-QOL-questionnaire) and upper extremity functional impairment (DASH-score). Presence of PTS was classified according to the modified Villalta-score. Comparisons between patients and controls and between patients with and without PTS were performed using Fisher`s exact test (categorical variables) and Mann-Whitney-U-test (continuous variables). According to the modified Villalta-score, 32 % of the patients suffered from mild to moderate PTS. None of the patients developed severe PTS. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients with a history of primary UEDVT reported on considerably worse health-related quality of life and significantly stronger upper extremity functional impairment. Within the cohort of patients with UEDVT, subjects with PTS had a significantly reduced quality of life and a more severe functional limitation. Quality of life and functional performance are impaired in patients with a history of conservatively treated primary UEDVT. Impairment is most pronounced in patients with mild to moderate PTS occurring in every third patient.
    VASA.: Zeitschrift für Gefässkrankheiten. Journal for vascular diseases 05/2012; 41(3):200-4. · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to describe the sonographic pattern and clinical manifestations of extracranial (i.e. carotid and proximal arm arteries) and cranial arterial involvement in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). One hundred and ten consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of GCA between January 2002 and June 2010 were identified retrospectively from a database. All patients underwent colour duplex sonography (CDS) of the superficial temporal, carotid, and proximal arm arteries at the time of diagnosis. Circumferential, homogeneous, hypoechogenic wall thickening was regarded as a typical sign for GCA. Sonographic and clinical characteristics of patients with and without extracranial vessel involvement were compared. Extracranial GCA was observed in 59 of 110 subjects (53.6%). The axillary artery (48.2%) was most frequently affected and bilateral vessel involvement was present in almost all patients (94.8%). Compared to patients with cranial GCA, patients with extracranial GCA were significantly younger, frequently did not meet the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for classification of cranial GCA, exhibited a lower rate of permanent visual impairment, and were diagnosed later after onset of clinical symptoms (all p < 0.01). With increasing age, a continuous shift from GCA with extracranial arterial involvement to cranial GCA was observed. Using CDS, extracranial GCA is a common finding, most frequently observed in the axillary arteries. The clinical pattern of GCA with extracranial arterial involvement differs from that of cranial GCA.
    Scandinavian journal of rheumatology 03/2012; 41(3):231-6. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the extent and clinical significance of giant cell arteritis (GCA) of the femoropopliteal arteries. This was a retrospective clinical color duplex sonography (CDS) study; 60 of 112 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of GCA underwent complete clinical examination of the lower extremities including the vasculature, systolic ankle pressure measurement, and CDS scans of the femoropopliteal arteries within 1 year after diagnosis of GCA. Circumferential, hypoechogenic, homogenous wall thickening was regarded as a hallmark of femoropopliteal GCA. GCA of femoropopliteal arteries was present in 32 (53.3%) of 60 patients. In general, femoropopliteal GCA developed bilaterally (100%) and 14 patients (23.3%) had significant lower extremity artery obstructions secondary to vasculitis, all leading to symptomatic lower extremity ischemia, with development of critical leg ischemia in 4 patients. Compared with subjects without lower extremity vasculitis, patients with femoropopliteal involvement had a significant time delay until diagnosis (mean 23.9 vs 11.1 weeks; p = 0.03) and a higher frequency of concomitant vasculitis of the arm arteries (74.2% vs 42.9%; p = 0.02). Femoropopliteal artery involvement appears to be a clinically relevant manifestation of GCA, frequently leading to symptomatic lower extremity ischemia. CDS of the femoropopliteal arteries is a noninvasive diagnostic tool for detection of lower extremity vasculitis in GCA.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 02/2012; 39(2):314-21. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bacterial infection of endovascular stent grafts is a serious condition, regularly leading to graft replacement by open bypass surgery. We describe the case of a staphylococcal infection of a 150-mm covered stent graft (Gore Viabahn), placed in the superficial femoral artery. Stent graft infection was successfully treated by oral administration of penicillinase-resistant flucloxacillin and the lipopeptide daptomycin with complete graft preservation, not requiring surgical treatment. During 1-year follow-up, the graft infection did not reappear. However, the patient developed restenosis at the proximal margin of the stent with recurrence of mild claudication, so far treated conservatively. With the increased use of covered stent grafts in the peripheral vasculature, the frequency of graft infection will increase. We demonstrate that with newly developed antibiotics, it is possible to treat this severe complication conservatively, with complete graft preservation and without the need for bypass surgery in selected cases.
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology 11/2010; 34(3):642-6. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteochondroma is the most common type of benign bone tumour, and is most often found in the knee region. The lesion is usually clinically silent although it may cause different complications such as fractures of the tumour, bone deformities, neurological disorders, malignant transformation and in rare cases vascular disorders. Vascular disorders include stenosis, occlusions, thrombosis, arteriovenous fistula and in rare cases pseudoaneurysm formation. A delay in diagnosis especially of pseudoaneurysm formation may result in life-threatening situations, extensive operations and lengthy hospital stays. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with an osteochondroma of the distal femur which caused pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery.
    VASA.: Zeitschrift für Gefässkrankheiten. Journal for vascular diseases 08/2010; 39(3):274-7. · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and imaging results (CDS, 18-FDG-PET) of patients with large vessel giant cell arteritis (LV-GCA) presenting as fever of unknown origin (FUO). From a series of 82 patients with GCA we identified 8 patients with FUO as initial disease manifestation. Clinical characteristics and results of CDS and 18-FDG-PET were analysed. Patients with FUO and those with other clinical manifestations of GCA were compared. 18-FDG-PET-scans were available for 6/8 patients, revealing enhanced tracer uptake of the thoracic aorta and the aortic branches in all patients. CDS was performed in 8/8 patients, with detection of hypoechogenic wall thickening related to LV-GCA in 7/8 patients. Subjects with FUO were significantly younger (60.9 vs. 69.3 years, p<0.01) and had a stronger humoral inflammatory response (CRP 12.6 vs. 7.1 mg/dl, p<0.01; ESR 110 vs. 71 mm/hour, p<0.01), when compared to the other GCA-patients. LV-GCA should be considered as important differential diagnosis in patients with FUO. In addition to 18-FDG-PET, which is known to be a valuable method in the diagnostic work-up of FUO, we recommend CDS of the supraaortal and femoropopliteal arteries for the initial diagnostic work-up.
    Clinical and experimental rheumatology 01/2010; 28(4):549-52. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 32-year-old woman with severe foot pain came to our emergency department after a busy night duty in hospital followed by an extended sleep period. Physical examination revealed a discrete swelling of the medial aspect of the right foot and a painful plantar arch during digital examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intravenous gadolinium showed filling defects in the lateral plantar vein. Doppler sonography displayed noncompressible structures in the plantar veins without flow signals, suggesting a plantar vein thrombosis. Therapy was initiated with low-molecular-weight heparin in combination with customized elastic bandages for the lower leg. Follow-up sonography 6 weeks later showed complete patency of the plantar veins. To our knowledge, we present the first case of isolated plantar vein thrombosis independent of trauma, surgery, or malignant disease, most probably caused by a busy night duty on the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by a prolonged sleeping period.
    Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis 12/2009; 17(2):232-4. · 1.02 Impact Factor
  • Antje Rademacher
    MMW Fortschritte der Medizin 11/2009; 151(47):65-7, 69; quiz 70.
  • Antje Rademacher
    MMW Fortschritte der Medizin 11/2008; 150(43):35.
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    ABSTRACT: We report about a young patient with a large aneurysm of the left external iliac vein associated with a traumatic arteriovenous fistula between the left superficial femoral artery and the femoral vein after a stab wound 20 years ago. The patient presented with swelling of the left leg, which developed during the past years and worsened after saphenectomy 12 months before hospital admission. The chronically hyperperfused common iliac artery proximal to the arteriovenous fistula was compressing the common iliac vein. The venous outflow obstruction and subsequent venous hypertension render a possible explanation for the formation of the iliac vein aneurysm. Surgical repair of the venous aneurysm by interposition grafting and closure of the arteriovenous fistula was successful. A postoperative computed tomography scan showed a 50% size reduction of the feeding artery, underlining the ability of the arterial system to normalize arterial diameter in response to flow reduction, even after a high flow situation had existed for probably >20 years.
    Journal of Vascular Surgery 01/2008; 47(1):205-8. · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • Vascular Medicine 06/2004; 9(2):141-3. · 1.62 Impact Factor