S.R. Gupta

Apollo College of Veterinary Medicine, Raipur, Rajasthan, India

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Publications (23)49.7 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The occurrence of Eimeria leukarti infection in equine is being sporadically documented despite its cosmopolitan prevalence. A Marwari mare, aged 3 years and 6 months and owned by a socio-economically weaker class of labourer of royal families, was suffering from non specific enteric disorders. Detailed systemic clinical examination of mare confirmed subclinical enteric infection with E. leukarti and piroplasms of Babesia (Theileria) equi in the circulating erythrocytes. She was therapeutically managed with synchronous administration of specific and supportive therapy with success. Non specific clinical manifestations of the disease in equines, its debatable pathogenic significance, predisposing immunosuppressive impact of concurrent B. (T.) equi in circulating erythrocytes and probable reasons for under reporting of the disease in equines, etc. have been discussed.
    Journal of parasitic diseases 10/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Six domesticated Newzealand white rabbits were presented in the Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex of Apollo College of Veterinary Medicine, Jaipur with clinical history of alopecia and dermatological lesions, confines to head, over face and on nose, eyelids and ears. All the affected rabbits were lethargic emaciated and had disturbed feed intake. History also revealed the death of eight other rabbits of the same flock. Microscopic examination of skin scrappings revealed concurrent infestation of Sarcoptes scabiei var. cuniculi, a mange mite and Microsporum gypseum, a dermatophyte. The infestation were therapeutically managed by inoculating each rabbit with Ivermectin subcutaneously @ 200 µg/kg body weight, besides topical application of antifungal lotion i.e. “Wokazole” (Miconazole 2%, Gentamicin 0.1%, Clobetasol 0.025%), daily after thorough washing of lesions with 1 % hydrogen peroxide until complete healing of leisons. The rabbits responded the therapy and fully recovered with healthy fur coat by day-21 post start of treatment. This pioneering documentation of concurrent acarine and mycotic infestations in rabbits and its successful treatment and control through improved hygienic sanitation and disinfection of surrounding have been discussed.
    Journal of Veterinary Parasitology 06/2013; 27(1):22-24.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Ingestion of highly fermentable carbohydrate feed in excessive quantities or decrease amount of well structure roughages and gradually increase in concentrate in ration for a prolonged period in ruminants leads to decrease time of rumination, reduction in amount of saliva, decline in ruminal pH to such degree that change in microbial flora in rumen and favour the multiplication of amylolytic bacteria which degrade starch and sugar causing rapid fermentation and production of large quantity of lactic acid and long chained volatile fatty acids (VFA). This turned normal buffering capacity of rumen resulting ruminal acidosis, ruminal hypotonocity and/or rumen stasis, circulatory impairment, decrease renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate, dehydration, hypovolumic shock and death. (Anderson, 1992; Wendy, 1992).The case fatality rate may be up to 90 per cent in untreated cases where as in therapeutically managed cases it may exceed to 30 – 40 per cent (Radostits et al., 2007). Although this disease has been extensively studied for its clinico-biochemical aspects in bovine (Mishra et al., 1972; Mishra and Singh, 1974; Randhawa et al., 1989; Dwivedi, 2000), sheep (Hoflund et al., 1948) and experimental goats (Rai and Pandey, 1980; Tanwar and Mathur, 1983; Lai et al., 1989; Basak et al., 1993; Hajikolaei et al., 2006), but reports in clinical cases of ruminal acidosis in goats is meagre. Keeping in view the above facts, the present investigation was undertaken to study the changes in ruminal activity (ruminal motility, consistency and pH of ruminal fluid, motility and activity of rumen micro-flora) of goats suffering from different degrees of ruminal acidosis (mild, moderate and severe), which might be of immense help in quick and proper diagnosis and treatment of this disease. ABSTRACT The present study is carried out on 10 goats of Sirohi breed which were diagnosed as dietary induced metabolic acidosis. In present study, ruminal pH, ruminal motility, odour, colour, consistency of rumen liquor, ruminal microflora and protozoal motility differed significantly from apparently healthy groups of goats. In haematological parameters, a significant increase observed in haemoglobin, packed cell volume and total leukocyte counts and biochemistry showed significant increase in blood lactate level, total protein, AST, ALT and serum sodium level while serum potassium level were significantly decreased.
    Veterinary practitioner 12/2012; 13(2):3112. · 0.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ever since the dawn of human civilization, rabies has been recognized as one of the most dangerous and feared zoonotic disease of the world, as it affects different species of warm blooded animal and is fatal in clinical cases exhibiting characteristics neurological signs. There exists no satisfactory post exposure therapy. Control of the disease mainly relayed on the prevention of the viral infection in companion animals (Dog and cats) by vaccination in the enzootic areas. Author herein place on record the bird's eye view on the latest development in identification of virus and its fragments, demonstrating anti-rabies specific antibodies, molecular techniques and further projection for quick and reliable diagnosis of the disease.
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    ABSTRACT: Ever since the dawn of human civilization, rabies has been recognized as one of the most dangerous and feared zoonotic disease of the world, as it affects different species of warm blooded animal and is fatal in clinical cases exhibiting characteristics neurological signs. There exists no satisfactory post exposure therapy. Control of the disease mainly relayed on the prevention of the viral infection in companion animals (Dog and cats) by vaccination in the enzootic areas. Author herein place on record the bird's eye view on the latest development in identification of virus and its fragments, demonstrating anti-rabies specific antibodies, molecular techniques and further projection for quick and reliable diagnosis of the disease.
    international journal of Agro Veterinary and Medical Sciences. 10/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Eperythrozoon spp.-a rickettsial (Mycoplasma) pathogen of the mammalian erythrocytic cell membrane, has been recognised to cause non specific, sporadic, febrile and haemolytic clinical disease in a variety of livestock, especially food animals. However, clinical eperythrozoonosis in companion animals seems not documented so far. An adult male German shepherd dog, aged 10.5 years and weighing 45 kg with clinical history of persistent mild fever in morning hours, depression and anorexia for the past 5 days and nasal bleeding for the past few months, was presented to clinicians for therapeutic management. Microscopic examination of Giemsa stained blood smear evidenced characteristic light pinkish to blue stained cocci and/or short rod shaped pathogens identified as Eperythrozoon canis, nesting in the depressions on the periphery of erythrocyte cell membrane as well as extra cellular free bodies in the plasma. Rhinoscopic detailed investigation failed to demonstrate any lesion in the nasal passage that could be attributed to the frequent nasal bleeding for the past few months. The dog was subsequently therapeutically managed with success using specific therapy and followed by supportive therapy. Finally, the predisposing factors of the disease, reasons for frequent nasal bleeding, clinical course of the disease in canines and its public health significance vis-à-vis future projections have been discussed.
    Journal of parasitic diseases 10/2012; 36(2):181-183.
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    Haryana Veterinarian. 06/2012; 51(2):63.
  • Planta Medica 07/1986; 52(3):246. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • S K Garg, N D Sharma, S R Gupta
    Planta Medica 11/1981; 43(11):306-8. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A chemical investigation of Didymocarpus pedicellata has resulted in the isolation of 8-hydroxy-5, 6, 7-trimethoxy-flavanone, 2'-hydroxy-4', 5', 6'-trimethoxychalcone, 5, 6, 7, 8-tetramethoxy flavanone, pedicellin, methyl pedicin and beta-sitosterol. 8-Hydroxy-5, 6, 7-trimethoxy flavanone and 2'-hydroxy-4', 5', 6'-trimethoxy chalcone are hitherto new natural products while 5, 6, 7, 8-tetramethoxy flavanone has been isolated from D. pedicellata for the first time.
    Planta Medica 09/1981; 43(1):86-8. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • S.K. Garg, S.R. Gupta, N.D. Sharma
    Phytochemistry 09/1979; 18(10):1764–1765. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • Planta Medica 06/1979; 36(1):95-6. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • S. Bhanumati, S.C. Chhabra, S.R. Gupta
    Phytochemistry 01/1979; 18(7):1254. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • S.C. Chhabra, S.R. Gupta, N.D. Sharma
    Phytochemistry 16(3):399. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • S.K. Garg, N.D. Sharma, S.R. Gupta
    Phytochemistry 19(10):2215–2216. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • J.S. Rathore, S.K. Garg, S.R. Gupta
    Phytochemistry 20(7):1755–1756. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • Phytochemistry 18(2):365–366. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • S.K. Garg, S.R. Gupta, N.D. Sharma
    Phytochemistry 17(12):2135–2136. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • S.K. Garg, S.R. Gupta, N.D. Sharma
    Phytochemistry 18(2):352. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • Phytochemistry 16(7):1109. · 3.35 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

19 Citations
49.70 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Apollo College of Veterinary Medicine
      Raipur, Rajasthan, India
  • 1979–1981
    • University of Delhi
      • Department of Chemistry (Faculty of Science)
      Delhi, NCT, India